#1
I've been trying to learn Paganini's 5th Caprice, and I found out that the last notes are way beyond the 25 fret. I've watched Crossroads and a few YouTube covers when they play the last notes in around the 15 fret. Does anyone know a technique to do that?
#3
Miguel Ch thing is those transcriptions are as it sounds on the recording, which has any number of tricks up its sleeve; it could have been played with a slide, on a different guitar tuned up, it could have been pitch-shifted, as AcousticMirror points out it could be careful use of harmonics... there are so many things that could have been done to make the note sound that high.  Even excepting all of that, the recording in the movie has several layers of guitars in that part, either playing harmonies or the same note several different octaves.

Your best bet is to figure out something to play that sounds about right, be that down an octave, some harmony for it, whatever sounds good to you.  If you really want to have a stab at getting notes that high, I'd either look in to using a slide carefully, or using a Ron Thal style thimble on your picking hand.  I can't get video links right now but I think if you search "Ron Thal thimble" on youtube you should be able to find something useful.

No matter what you do, you're not going to bue able to get those super high pitches without some playing that you generally don't see in 'normal' electric guitar playing.
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#4
I thought this was going to be a thread about the caparison Horus but I think that guitar ONLY goes to 27.
#5
Quote by risingforce1
I thought this was going to be a thread about the caparison Horus but I think that guitar ONLY goes to 27.

Uli Roth Sky Guitar - that can easily do it.
#6
You know that if you play an open string and touch the 5th fret (a 4th interval above) you get a harmonic an octave above the open string pitch, right?

That same principle allows you to play an octave above ANY fretted note by touching five frets higher and sounding the harmonic.
This is a classical violin technique that works well because of the constant energy imparted to the string by the bow, and since the string length scale on the violin is short it is pretty easy.
On the guitar, you need to be pretty high of the neck for the distance (up a 4th, 5 frets) to be manageable fingering wise, and you will need some gain to get the harmonic to express itself... but it is not too hard with practice, especially if it is only required for a few very high notes.

On a 21 fret guitar, if you hold the highest fret of the high E string (Db) and play its octave up harmonic by touching a 4th higher (which is passed the finger board), that octave up harmonic is as if you where playing at the 33 fret.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#7
Quote by PlusPaul
You know that if you play an open string and touch the 5th fret (a 4th interval above) you get a harmonic an octave above the open string pitch, right?

Two octaves above the open string pitch. The harmonic at the 12th fret is an octave above the open string.
You can also use what are called 'harp harmonics', this will give you a pitch an octave above the note being fretted.
e.g. see here, at 2:20
#8
Yes, two octaves... so that is like 45 frets... !  
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#10
cdgraves
Which string for the natural harmonic at 17th, the high E? I make that an E, three octaves above the open string = 36th fret. Should be the same pitch as the hard to get natural harmonic just after the 2nd fret.
I can get a high B (31st fret) by pushing my high E string into the casing of my pickup and then picking the string.
#11
Quote by NSpen1
cdgraves
Which string for the natural harmonic at 17th, the high E?  I make that an E, three octaves above the open string = 36th fret.  Should be the same pitch as the hard to get natural harmonic just after the 2nd fret.
I can get a high B (31st fret) by pushing my high E string into the casing of my pickup and then picking the string.

That's correct, my mistake. Yes, the 5th harmonic fret is 2 octaves above the open string. 

To get the "29th fret" you'd hold the 5th or 17th fret and pluck the artificial harmonic a where the 29th fret would be, past the fretboard. That would be halfway between the 17th fret and the bridge. With the 5th fret you're more likely to get undertones.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 7, 2017,
#12
Quote by Miguel Ch
I've been trying to learn Paganini's 5th Caprice, and I found out that the last notes are way beyond the 25 fret. I've watched Crossroads and a few YouTube covers when they play the last notes in around the 15 fret. Does anyone know a technique to do that?

The YouTube covers that you see doing this are just using an octave pitch shifter. 
Go up as high as you can, engage shifter, come back an octave and keep going.