#1
Each student has different abilities and predispositions of course
Our talents are different but regardless of this
Under the supervision of a good teacher,we have a chance to become professionals.

The difference it consists only on this that someone with higher abilities
become a professional faster,and someone with less abilities become a professional slower.
But at the end of their path to professionalism,both people will reach the same level.
So,time will be the only difference,not obtained skills.


Interestingly,good technique and knowledge of harmony
does not mean being a good teacher and vice versa.

Even without hands you can be a great teacher.

What determines that someone know how teach others and someone else not?

How many people have wasted their predispositions because they not finding a good teacher?  

One of them is me...

Since childhood I heard that I should go to music school
but parents did not want this.

Once a professor from a music academy told me that I should start learning singing 
because I have the original color of the voice and good hearing.

With one leg I was already in academy
and then anxiety neurosis + social phobia thwarted my plans.

Happiness is more important than talent in my opinion.
Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Apr 6, 2017,
#2
Good post. I agree with your points.
I think happiness can be large part of talent, but a lot of musicians express their talent through sadness as well. Being inspired by other musicians is what makes most people want to start in the first place, it's all natural full circle really. Some people can teach very well, but I think music is more about passion than anything. You can't teach someone to be passionate, or talented for that matter. It's all really innate interest. I'm a self taught musician in terms of skill and production, and I think what fuels me to progress with my talent is that i'm just passionate about learning new things and i'm inspired to keep creating and improve on what I started. I agree that a lot of people could really benefit from having a coach to guide them, no doubt about that.
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#3
When I started playing guitar, I had a teacher who would show me how to play the songs I liked. A lot of people's first lessons probably involved practicing scales and learning nursery rhymes, so it was motivating to have a teacher that allowed me to learn what I wanted.
Then I had to go to a different school and the guitar teacher there was a asshole and made me want to stop playing music altogether.
#4
I think it depends partly on how flexible a teacher is in terms of their teaching style, and partly in how they can cater to what a student wants to learn. Patience is also a very important thing when it comes to teaching anything.

When I was about 7 years old, my parents signed me up for piano/keyboard lessons at school, but the teacher was a dick. I was a little bit slow to pick up reading, and I couldn't get the hang of getting my left and right hand to cooperate, so the teacher basically gave up on me. If it was a one on one lesson he may have been more patient, but he had about five or so other kids in his class, so he just seemed to find an average speed of learning and those who weren't picking certain things up fast enough got left behind. It put me off playing piano, as I kind of convinced myself that I had no musical ability. I occasionally play every now and again now, but still can't multitask with my hands outside of playing bass notes that follow the same or a similar rhythm to the chords/melody.

In terms of guitar, I had a tutor for maybe a month in school, and he was pretty good - he was a rock and metal kind of guy, so we spoke the same language in terms of a lot of things. 

After that I was self taught up until university, where I started taking lessons again. This guy was mainly a jazz player, but he had been playing for 30+ years and was open to pretty much any kind of style you could throw at him. He was incredibly patient, and took the mentality that he would rather I took twenty minutes trying to to perfect a certain technique/scale/whatever, rather than take two minutes to sloppily rush through it. He did give you a bit of a grilling if you haven't practiced enough between lessons, but he wasn't too much of an asshole about it.  

I think part of being a good teacher is understanding that you didn't just wake up with the skills or techniques that you have - you had to learn and practice, just as your students would have to, and so it will take them as long as it takes to learn new shit.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#5
Quote by sashki
When I started playing guitar, I had a teacher who would show me how to play the songs I liked. A lot of people's first lessons probably involved practicing scales and learning nursery rhymes, so it was motivating to have a teacher that allowed me to learn what I wanted.
Then I had to go to a different school and the guitar teacher there was a asshole and made me want to stop playing music altogether.


Most of my students don't listen to music and don't have anything they want to learn.

So I end up doing nursery rhyme stuff because at least they know it.

It's kind of a bummer
#6
 I think music is more about passion than anything. 


Passions = emotions.
Emotions obfuscate mind and reasonable thinking,emotions are the worst advisor and conductor

Under the influence of emotion most mistakes are made
Eg bad habits during technical exercises etc.


Art is a feelings which are left after the emotion has subside
which in contrast to emotions are more subtle, long-term
Not so sharp,sudden and temporary.

Under the influence of emotion I learned myself many unnecessary things
Losing  time and energy in this way.
Emotions are like drugs but this is probably the topic for a separate discussion

The basic mistake I made it was that I did not want to study other musicians' songs
I behaved like child which wanted to learn speak without the help of ready alphabet and grammar rules.

I thought that in this way I would create my own unique style and my compositions will be original in 10000%

What was my surprise when it turned out that majority of musicians
play the same chord progressions, and patents,

It was a shock and a feeling of disappointment

A good teacher is like an illuminated road to destination point
Self teaching is like...ramble of blind man in the dark,few come to destination point only by accident/happiness :p


Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Apr 7, 2017,