#1
Currently, I play my acoustic/electric through a Peavey KB100 Keyboard amp. It's old, but it works. It sounds OK, but doesn't sound great. It was specifically advertised as being suitable for use as a PA system. It works adequately as a coffee house rig, meaning it's the only thing you need for a singer/songwriter or troubadour gig. But, the is only EQ for the entire amp, not separate settings for each channel. Same with reverb. Lately, I've been checking out demos on YouTube of acoustic amps like the Fender Acoustasonic or the Fishman Loudbox amps. The problem is, almost none of the demos ever include plugging a mic into one channel for singing. And that's the whole point of a coffee house rig. If you can't sing while accompanying yourself on the guitar, what's the point? 

Does anyone have any experience with which acoustic guitar amps that include a mic channel actually sound good on both guitar and mic? I know, I'm the one who always says "good" sound is in the ear of the listener. But I'm curious about things like versatility, clarity of tone on both the vocals and the instrument, the ability to control the guitar and the mic separately for EQ, reverb, etc., and other such details. 
#2
Carvin powered speakers like the PM12A or the Electro-Voice ZLX-12p.  I have used both and prefer the EV but both will get it done for an acoustic gig.

https://carvinaudio.com/collections/pm-series-active-passive-lightweight-molded-speakers/products/pm12a-molded-2-way-12-inch-powered-loudspeaker-monitor
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/ZLX12p?adpos=1t1&creative=189190674680&device=c&matchtype=b&network=g&gclid=CKCT_-qhmNMCFUOXfgodt6kLPw

Most powered speakers in this class have multiple inputs but one common EQ section.  If you KNOW you need separate EQ on each channel consider adding a small mixer or a dedicated acoustic guitar DI like the Baggs for more precise control.  I have done acoustic gigs both ways and usually bring the Baggs unless we are performing as a duo where a mixer is needed.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
You're not the first person to recommend a powered PA speaker, or even a portable PA, as an alternative to a guitar amp. Most open mics I go to seem to use a  PA system for both guitars and mics. I've also noticed that many of those open mics with PA systems really make the quacky sound of piezos obvious. Whenever you hear anyone onstage whose guitar doesn't quack like a duck is usually playing an electric or an acoustic with a magnetic pickup in the sound hole, like I use. And when I talk to people whose acoustic/electric guitars don't quack, it almost always turns out that they have a premium model with a different sort of sound transducer. 

However, I have an adequate acoustic guitar pedal. It's a Zoom 504 II, with way too many useless features, but it does do a good job on "de-quacking" my piezo equipped Alvarez 12-string. With my six-string with the soundhole pickup, I only need the pedal for the tuner. 
#4
Well, Carvin makes several dedicated acoustic amps. They're all multi-channel with tone controls for each channel. (IIRC). I think they go up to about 200 watts, and have matching extension speakers available. With that said, most house PA systems should have mixing capabilities. With that said, You would most likely have to do some serious brown nosing to gain access to said EQ and mixing.

Always remember, once you have to mic an amp in situations such as were discussing, you're at the mercy of the quality of the microphone(s). 

Some quick thoughts on piezo "quack". Musicians seem to be the only people annoyed by it. It's most apparent when the treble has too much boost. Loud music diminishes a person's ability to hear high frequency sounds, as does being male and over about 20 years of age. This causes a person to inject too much treble into their sound, and wah-la, you have piezo quack. House PS systems need treble boosted because crowds, bottles clanking and such, all eat up treble.

The moral of the story is, more than likely, you're the only person truly bothered by the alleged quack anyway.
#5
gerdner 

To each his own. It's been a long time since I've played a coffeehouse but I have been gigging acoustic guitar thru a powered PA for 15 years and my sound is very much quack free.  I do take my onboard Baggs EQ settings seriously though.  Any experienced player with a good ear and a decent EQ can solve this and it sounds like you have worked it out already.  Quacky acoustic guitar tone is nearly always the result of an inexperienced player, not the amp or PA he is using.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Apr 13, 2017,
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
gerdner

Quacky acoustic guitar tone is nearly always the result of an inexperienced player, not the amp or PA he is using.

Where I notice piezo "quack" the most is at open mic nights, when everyone takes their turn plugging into the same PA system. When one has control over all aspects of one's sound, or has a skilled expert handling the sound, then good results are to be expected. But when one doesn't have control, one needs to "stack the deck" in one's favor to compensate for any deficiencies beyond one's control. 
#7
gerdner Then a Baggs Para EQ or other device to control the sound you send to the board separates you (and me) from all the other quacky sounding novice guitarists.  We plan ahead, send them a well tempered audio signal that will be difficult for the house sound to screw up later.  Job done.  

That is my most successful approach anyways when working with unknown house sound.  Try it and see if it works for you as well.  I have a scaled-down version of this onboard my guitar but the pedal works great as well.
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/ParaDI
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Apr 13, 2017,
#8
There is apparently no problem on earth that cannot be solved by throwing money at it.
#9
Lots of different ways to skin this cat.  Either get a quality powered wedge or a quality para DI, or both, so you as the artist have better control over your sound.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
Quote by Cajundaddy
Lots of different ways to skin this cat.  Either get a quality powered wedge or a quality para DI, or both, so you as the artist have better control over your sound.

Truth be told, I'm not an artist. I'm an entertainer. If the audience enjoys it, I've done my job. When I'm facing a situation where I can control things in advance, I do my best to maximize results. If I cannot control things, I still do my best to maximize results. For me, success is measured by applause. And to be honest, I'm just as happy if a joke I tell between songs gets a laugh as I am if they give me the clap after the song is over. Or because the song is over.