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#1
Hi, guys.
I'd like to know what do you prefer - V (Jackson RR, Gibson Flying V etc.) or maybe Superstrats (Ibanez RG seriers, Jacksons, etc.).
What do you like more and why? Looks, convenience, sound or maybe something else?
I want to read something about guitars like Ibanez RG321MH, RG450, RG550, RG421, Jackson PS-1, PS-2, RR3, RR24 Dean 79ML. You have that guitars? Send a pic and write sth about it!
Also, what neck is your favourite from guitars listed above and why?

Let's start a talk!
#2
I'll bite.

I love V's and Superstrats and I don't have a preference of one over the other.

Hence why I own both.

I use my Gibson V '68 for downtuning. There's something about the midrange that's prevalent in the 60's style Gibson V's (I think it's down to the way the guitars are so heavily front-routed) that lends themselves to maintaining clarity with downtuning. I love the neck on the particular one I own too. It has a medium-thin D shape that continues to flatten out as you go further down the neck. The 500T pickups are pretty kickass for metal too. Very reminiscent of Duncan SH-6's. The guitar's super light, balances on a strap beautifully and is almost semi-hollow-like in loudness acoustically.

My heavily modded Jackson DK2M MIJ is a great guitar if I want lots of versatile coil splitting options (The JB/Jazz pickups are particularly awesome when split) and if I'm in the mood for 80-90's prog and thrash with a Floyd (A Schaller Floyd in my case). The neck feels incomparably different to the Gibson's. It's a totally different profile of D-shape. thinner, wider, and more consistent in the radius of the shoulders from the nut to the bridge. The compound radius fretboard makes a minor difference in feel higher up the neck, but it's there. It's a great guitar for playing leads on the neck pickup because the Jazz is so articulate and it's positioning higher up the neck due to its 24 frets has a hand in that. The JB has a very snarly EVH sort of sound to it. But that's probably just me hearing the guitar with my eyes. The fact that it is a very 80's styled guitar and the fact I'm running a 5153 has got a lot more to do with that.

They're fundamentally different tools that cater to different applications.

Pics of both guitars are in my profile.
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#3
I do not care for Vs or Strats regular or super. I'm not into pointy or odd shaped guitars nor tremolos, I like SGs, Telecasters, and Jazz boxes. If I had to choose between a V or a Strat I would go for a fixed bridge Strat with a carved top, it's too hard to play a V without a strap.
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#4
I prefer Vs for the looks, the light weight, the comfort while playing standing. I have to Vs and two Xs. 

V's are fine for playing while sitting too, even without a strap, as long as you don't try to rest the body on your right leg or some such thing, just put the lower horn between your legs and you're good to go. 
#5
V's. They look awesome, and that's really it. I like the Strat shape, especially a super-Strat style like the Soloist, ESP M or Snapper, BC Rich Gunslinger, etc. etc., but V's and Explorers are my bag. I prefer playing classical style sitting down, which actually gives the V an advantage. 
#6
I've got one V, two sort of X-shape guitars and a raft of superstrats. I love the look of the former, but the superstrats are just so much more practical and comfortable to play. 
#7
I prefer the look of Vs over Strats...but I have never found a V that felt comfy in my hands. So that bodystyle is one that will never be a part of my collection.
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Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
I prefer Vs personally, unfortunately I do not own one now. I feel like they are more comfortable while sitting and while standing. Maybe that's just a me thing but I feel like the neck access is better on the V. I have never played a Jackson V so I cannot attest to that.
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#10
Quote by Nastrun
I heard that Vs are bad balanced. I mean, RR jacksons. Is it true?


They can be neck-heavy, and they can tilt forward. There's also the fact that, like an SG, the fretboard is pushed pretty far left as the guitar hangs in a strap, and some players have issues with their upper arms/shoulders because of it. 



On mine, for example, the strap buttons are on the back of the guitar in a spot corresponding to the 21st or 22nd fret, and at the very tip of the upper bout. In order to keep them from tipping forward, you usually need to re-orient a strap button into the V, about three inches in from the end of the bout, and pull the strap over the FRONT of the guitar. This is also an issue with explorers and SGs. 

By comparison, strats and most superstrats have the neck position strap button all the way up by the 12th fret, and that moves the whole guitar (and, of course, the fretboard) to the right. 



Worth noting that upper fret access on some V's is actually worse than on some superstrats because the upper frets are actually buried in the body, and your thumb has already encountered the strap button and the full thickness of the body getting there.  A neck-through superstrat (such as a Carvin) with a smooth neck heel and a strap button on the upper bout horn has none of those issues, and can have the 24th fret right at the bottom of the curve of the lower bout's cutaway. 


One final comment; a lot of  SG's, "X" and explorer type guitars have issues with strap button placement, but a few that have "reversed" bodies don't have that issue. The V220 Carvin is one. The upper bout strap button is at about the 16th fret, and the back strap button is actually well into the body. Both positions give you a lot better balance and better fretboard positioning, and are less likely to allow the strap to peel off the neck area strap button: 


Last edited by dspellman at Apr 10, 2017,
#11
V's are superior, that's no doubt.



they have way cooler headstocks.



but super strats are awesome too.

sorta super.



super duper, born from the bones of a super strat, the evolved super strat.



but they all do their thing, their way. you just can't love one more than the other.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#12
Quote by dspellman


One final comment; a lot of  SG's, "X" and explorer type guitars have issues with strap button placement, but a few that have "reversed" bodies don't have that issue. The V220 Carvin is one. The upper bout strap button is at about the 16th fret, and the back strap button is actually well into the body. Both positions give you a lot better balance and better fretboard positioning, and are less likely to allow the strap to peel off the neck area strap button

I also prefer the V, they feel better when standing. but I like a good superstrat with a nice thin neck sometimes, too.
The strap button thing is totally spot on. 
All of my explorers (except for my LTD) have had their strap button moved to the neck heel for better balance when standing. They tend to not neck dive with it there.
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#13
i don't seem to have neck dive issues with my V's. the buttons are placed where they should be, or my guitars are lighter than most? one is 6 lbs, the other 7 lbs.





dspellman i do see what you mean by the fretboard being further left or right though for sure.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#14
Strat-shapes for me. Ergonomics wins for me every time. 
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#15
I like both equally and have both I have more superstrats than anything mostly because I got great deals on them but also because they are so ergonomic and comfortable to play, I have a King V, RR3 and a cheapo Dean VX that was my sons that I took over and upgraded. I have a B.C. Rich Beast V which is a combination of a Speed V and a Beast and a Dean Split Tail which is a conbination of a V and an SG.

I also have an Ibanez Xiphos XPT700 which is an X shape.

I like the V's, X's and V hybrids because I am an old school metalhead starting back in the '80s and a fan extreme looking guitars, I also really like the superstrats which are also a throwback to the '80s/'90s metal scene. TBH I also like the traditional shapes Strats LP's etc.

I never really had neck dive problems with my V's.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
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Last edited by Evilnine at Apr 10, 2017,
#16
I once took a Gibson Les Paul Studio 2011 (or 2013) in my hands. Bleh, that was awful experience. Now I have a RG321MH superstrat and I must say - it's very nice guitar. Looks simple, so also beautiful, but I can't wait till I get RR3 (Snow White Pinstripe with Manowar Hammer sticker lol). I played some Jacksons superstrats and it was hands down the most comfortable guitars I have ever played. I wonder how good Ibanez RG550 is, but I can't afford it - it's too expensive for me (I could try to get RG450, but RR3 is probably better overall).
#17
Nastrun 
The V's always looked awkward to me, but I've never played one.
I have seen some creative solutions to the neck dive issue though.
Last edited by 33db at Apr 10, 2017,
#18
If I was into metal I would probably want one of these, very demonic looking.
SplitTail - Celtic    

#19
Quote by Nastrun
I heard that Vs are bad balanced. I mean, RR jacksons. Is it true?

I wouldn't put it in such general terms. I have no problems with my two Jackson Vs, they are beautifully balanced and stay in whatever position you put them. So I have no reason to believe a RR would be unbalanced. My impression is that it has more to do with strap button placement and general weight of the guitar and neck. Jacksons are light, with thin necks, so there's no reason for the neck to dive. I don't know about Vs from other brands though. 
#20
I'm with T00DEEPBLUE- they're both awesome, basically. If I had to pick, I'd probably pick superstrats, because they're a little more practical and a lot nicer for sitting down with, but Vs do look badass.
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#21
V vs Superstrat - The ultimate dillema of options IMO (For hard rock/metal at least)

The true solution? One of each, if possible!

Totally different beasts, with their own strengths and weaknesses/how they feel and play.

The one thing I will say, is that the traditional Gibson/Epiphone style flying V's are pretty different compared to their derivatives (Jackson RR, King V, etc), as they have a shorter scale length, and slightly thicker necks. They have more of a classic, chunky "Gibson" tone and feel to them IMO. Something like a Jackson RR will have a more similar neck profile (and same scale) to something like a Dinky/Soloist.
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Last edited by FlightofIcarus at Apr 11, 2017,
#22
Well what's the point of owning a V? 
Is there some technical difference between a V and a Strat I'm not aware of? 
Or is it just a style thing?
#23
Quote by 33db
If I was into metal I would probably want one of these, very demonic looking.
SplitTail - Celtic    



I have one of those mine is not the Celtic but a more expensive model with an OFR and binding on the neckand headstock, it is a great guitar it is an exceptional player with surprising awesome fretwork, the only real let down were the Dean USA Time Capsule pickups which were a bit dirty for my taste I replaced them with a JB/JM set and it's good to go. It was MSRP around $1200 but street price was $999 mine is a pawnshop special I got for $350 in near mint condition with the factory hard case it's white with a single black pinstripe around the bevel. I'll admit it doesn't look as good as the Celtic but Dean's in that price range $500 and less are pretty hit or miss.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#24
Quote by 33db
Well what's the point of owning a V? 
Is there some technical difference between a V and a Strat I'm not aware of? 
Or is it just a style thing?


Style. V's have always been popular in the metal scene.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#25
I've always wanted a V but never got around to buying one.  I own two super strats (a Jackson SL1 and a Jackson SL2).  Maybe one day.  I play in classical position when sitting so I have no issues playing a V sitting down.  I actually like the Explorer shape also but the body is too large to be comfortable sitting down for me and I'm 6'1. 

If I was to get a guitar to do the Les Paul tone (Mohogany body, 24 3/4 scale, no trem, etc.) I'd get one of those high end Dean V's with a nice top (except this one has a foyd) :


^I would much rather play that than a Gibson Les Paul and I suspect tonally it would be similar.

I also drool over Jackson or ESP King V's but would like it without a trem with the string through body like Mustaine's guitars. 
#27
Quote by 33db
Well what's the point of owning a V? 
Is there some technical difference between a V and a Strat I'm not aware of? 
Or is it just a style thing?

For me it's not just style, playing a V is a different feel. 
#28
33db 

It really does come down to style. Personally, I love Vs, but when playing certain shapes of guitars, I feel people expect you to play certain genres. For example, when I play my Jackson RRs, my buddies expect blistering metal riffs. I like to surprise them with classical or jazz pieces. When playing superstrats, I can get away with playing more genres. Just my experience. 

Having owned Vs and superstrats with identical specs, I couldn't distinguish any tonal differences between the two. I just gravitated towards the Vs though. I find them more comfortable to play in the classical position when sitting and I've never had neck dive issues with Vs (from any brand; strap placement is often overlooked with Vs). There are so many superstrats on the market that they all look the same to me. Vs stand out to me. It's a purely subjective argument, but most topics in the music world are! 
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Jackson RR3T Limited Edition with Seymour Duncan Blackouts (MIJ)
Jackson JS1-X Rhoads
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Dean Vendetta XM

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Peavey 6505 MH
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Boss TU-3 Tuner
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Last edited by BlackDeath92 at Apr 11, 2017,
#29
I like V's and Strats occasionally but I'm more after Offset Fender-style guitars mostly.

It's a mixture of comfort, aesthetics, and upper fret access.  The Jaguar and Jag-Stang body styles are my favorite.  If I needed a superstrat, I'd just roll my own "Super Jag" and be done with it....as if I really need anymore guitars.
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#30
Quote by 33db
Well what's the point of owning a V? 


Usually, there's the two on the lower end, and at least one on the headstock.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#31
Quote by 33db
1 Well what's the point of owning a V? 
2 Is there some technical difference between a V and a Strat I'm not aware of? 
3 Or is it just a style thing?

1 What's the point of owning any guitar?
2 Yes a few, construction methods, construction type, woods used, nut width, fret board radius, scale length, bridge type, tuners, fret board thickness, body to neck angle, head stock angle, strap pin locations, types of pick ups, controls, control functions... to name a few.
3 Yes, and see above.

Quote by 33db

The V's always looked awkward to me, but I've never played one.

you should try one, they're very comfortable. typically very lightweight.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at Apr 11, 2017,
#32
Quote by 33db
Well what's the point of owning a V? 
Is there some technical difference between a V and a Strat I'm not aware of? 
Or is it just a style thing?

They have a distinctive appearance. That's the point of owning any vee shaped guitar. 

There are some technical differences, but not that are intrinsic to the designs. Most V's are set-neck or even neck-through, most (but not all) super strats are bolt-on. That has a minimal difference in sound, but neither one is objectively superior. Most V's (but not all) use dual humbuckers, most (but not all) super strats use single coils. Again, that's purely a matter of personal taste. 

This is one of the many, many "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin" discussions that forums like this are plagued with. They generate gazillions of thoughtless responses, and are fun to participate in. These kinds of discussions are the internet forum equivalent of playing volleyball. It's fun, it passes the time, and means nothing. 

Personally, if I played metal, I'd want something really sharp and pointy looking and I'd want humbucking pickups. I have absolutely no practical or logical reason for preferring a pointy humbucker guitar over a curvy single coil guitar. Both are different, but either one is suitable for heavy metal. 

But then, if I were a Viking and had to go into battle, I'd prefer a really big battleaxe over a sword. Again, no logical reason for it. I just like the looks of a battleaxe compared to a sword. And that's pretty much what this whole thread boils down to. 
#33
Quote by gerdner
This is one of the many, many "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin" discussions that forums like this are plagued with. They generate gazillions of thoughtless responses, and are fun to participate in. These kinds of discussions are the internet forum equivalent of playing volleyball. It's fun, it passes the time, and means nothing.  


not really, it's a thread about preferences.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#34
Quote by gregs1020
not really, it's a thread about preferences.

Yes, it is about preferences, which is a type of unsubstantiated personal opinion. What subjective preferences and how many angels can dance on the head of a pin have in common is that neither topic is about subjective facts, and both are about personal, unsubstantiated opinion. I am not saying that such discussions are bad things. They are a waste of time, but if you have time and want to waste it, might as well have fun while doing it, right? I enjoy wasting time like this. It's just a wee bit tiresome when some folks take pointless-but-fun discussions like this way too seriously. 
#35
Quote by 33db
If I was into metal I would probably want one of these, very demonic looking.
SplitTail - Celtic    


You could put your eye out with that thing. 
#36
Quote by gerdner
Yes, it is about preferences, which is a type of unsubstantiated personal opinion.  

wouldn't a preference be a substantiated personal opinion? i mean, i know i like V's and i know why i like V's. that's not up for debate in my head, i have substantiated that with years of buying and selling les pauls.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#37
Quote by gregs1020
wouldn't a preference be a substantiated personal opinion? i mean, i know i like V's and i know why i like V's. that's not up for debate in my head, i have substantiated that with years of buying and selling les pauls.


Substantiated means supported by objective fact. When an opinion is supported by other opinions, it's still just an opinion. Being able to articulate depth and details of an opinion doesn't substantiate an opinion. Not that there's anything wrong with presenting detailed, in-depth opinions. That's part of the fun of threads like this.
#38
gerdner i'm just funnin' ya. about the preference thing.

we've clearly proven the V to be superior at this point.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#39
Quote by Evilnine
Style. V's have always been popular in the metal scene.

But not exclusive. See Albert King.
Also, the guitarist in Funkadelic Parliament uses BC Rich Warlocks...for funk. 

But, yeah, generally, V's and other extreme shapes aren't generally at home with pop, unlike Strat and LP shapes.

V's are generally lighter. My only experiences are with the JS32 Rhodes with no strap. OTOH, some BC Rich's are something around 10-12 pounds. I've entered into the game late (I started at 34), so weight is more on  my mind with gear than it is for you young whipper-snappers. :p My Squier Bullet is noticeably lighter than my other guitars, but as I've gone along, it's been less of a concern compared with other aspects.
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#40
I played a V live exclusively for bout 5 years. The most comfortable guitars for standing up and playing, especially if you are usually the longer top fin designed ones, like this:


The weight balance is perfect on these IMO, and are probably the most comfortable to play live.

The downside of Vs is that resale value usually is really bad, I had to wait for the next resurgence of metal in order to get rid of mine at a loss.
They are also very uncomfortable to play sitting down.

BTW - I forgot to mention this, but Vs in general have their own sound, more midrange with less bass, perfect for thrash metal, but not necessarily that good for some other genres.
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