#1
I just learned both solos to Johnny B Goode and I'm having trouble figuring out what scale to primarily use for improv. I want to keep Chuck Berry's primary sound and scale. I think it's either minor pentatonics with heavy chromatics, melodic minor, or some bebop scale. 

Any insight is appreciated.
#2
blues scale with a few accidentals.

http://12bar.de/cms/tutorial/scales/
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
It's basically just a blues riff in Bb so watch for the changes and try to keep up...

Bb minor is the primary scale you'd use, but depending on the notes you use and accidentals you'll end up wandering between B minor, B minor pentatonic and B blues.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#4
johndeluca2021 
Quote by johndeluca2021
I just learned both solos to Johnny B Goode and I'm having trouble figuring out what scale to primarily use for improv. I want to keep Chuck Berry's primary sound and scale. I think it's either minor pentatonics with heavy chromatics, melodic minor, or some bebop scale. 

Any insight is appreciated.

What's wrong with using the same scale used for the solos?  (You don't have to name the scale, just use all the same notes.  In different orders .)

The intro is basically a mix of major pent and minor pent, or mixolydian and dorian if you want modal terms.  A b7 and both 3rds.  I'd use the same thing for solos.  With reference to chord tones, of course (as Chuck did)...
Last edited by jonriley64 at Apr 10, 2017,