#1
Hey all -

Does anybody know an easy way that I can figure out what the frequency and Q is for my car stereo? Particularly for the midrange (although all of them would be nice, too).

I notice that whenever I cut my midrange with this knob on my tracks a few notches, it is like the perfect frequency range to tame, and it makes my tracks sound comparable to professional tracks when they have the midrange knob at 0.  I'd love to identify these frequencies for comparison purposes when mixing in my studio.

FWIW, my car is a 2016 jeep compass, totally stock.  I think all of the typical Jeep models use the same standard stereo, but I can't find the technical specs for the audio EQ.  Any help would be great!

EDIT: found out the stereo model.  Its an RES 130S
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Last edited by Watterboy at Apr 12, 2017,
#2
Although well-intentioned, I'm not sure even the most accurate of answers will be truly helpful.   For instance, what if we found out that the frequency center was 1khz with a bandwidth of one octave.  What would you do with that?

It might be tempting to just master all your tracks with an EQ dip at 1khz then, but that's not really a good approach.  Alternately, you could simply dip the EQ there temporarily to see what it might sound like in your car.  But then what?

Where your efforts are going to be best placed is in actually treating the disease and not the symptoms.  

What can you do to your room to prevent you from making mix decisions that over-excite those frequencies?  In the end, that will ensure greater compatibility (translation) from your mix environment to *all* listening situations.  

Let's maybe start with describing the room you are in.  (dimensions, materials, any existing treatment, etc.)

CT
 
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#3
Quote by axemanchris
Although well-intentioned, I'm not sure even the most accurate of answers will be truly helpful.   For instance, what if we found out that the frequency center was 1khz with a bandwidth of one octave.  What would you do with that?

It might be tempting to just master all your tracks with an EQ dip at 1khz then, but that's not really a good approach.  Alternately, you could simply dip the EQ there temporarily to see what it might sound like in your car.  But then what?

Where your efforts are going to be best placed is in actually treating the disease and not the symptoms.  

What can you do to your room to prevent you from making mix decisions that over-excite those frequencies?  In the end, that will ensure greater compatibility (translation) from your mix environment to *all* listening situations.  

Let's maybe start with describing the room you are in.  (dimensions, materials, any existing treatment, etc.)

CT
 

Its not so much that I just want to arbitrarily add a dip there - its more that, in that frequency range I always just seem to overdo it.  So, if I added that corrective EQ in advance, I would naturally mix it more pleasantly.  I've had this issue in MULTIPLE rooms, unfortunately.  I'm very comfortable with my car's EQ, I just wish I knew the specifics.

FWIW - I think it might be treating midrange from 1khz-10khz; I started doing gentle cuts there in my studio, and it makes a big pleasant difference for sure.  I think I have been making my cuts too narrow and not gentle enough.
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#4
The information is tough to find - I tried doing it with my Honda Civic to no avail. Same thing, reducing the bass one or two notches sometimes resulted in the perfect mix, but I had no clear way of knowing what that knob actually did. 

I would suggest emailing the company - maybe they can shoot the email to an engineer.