#1
I know this is a guitar forum, but I really want to get into playing the keyboard and I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what to look into?

My inspiration come from bands like Radiohead, Crystal Castles, NIN, and various bands like that. Even though they don't use various different midi effects, I really like the way they utilized them in Protomen (the band) I don't like posting free music but I shall anyway I guess...



Last edited by tear2slitwrists at Apr 16, 2017,
#2
I watched a lot of anime when I was younger, I really like random and off-kiler sci-fi sound effects, like when casshern splits one of the robots in half with his hand and it makes a "ka-ching" kind of sound, I love that! I want to find out of to put them on a keyboard. Isn't it some kind of classic sound effect? like a "tron" something?
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Last edited by tear2slitwrists at Apr 16, 2017,
#3
Are you looking for piano (88 keys) and traditional keyboard sounds or a synth to create unusual sounds? There is a huge difference between the two. I use midi a lot to create song files and backing tracks. For that I use a full size Yamaha keyboard with midi capabilities into a computer that has a software Roland TTS sound module. If you are looking for for synth sounds you should be looking into a smaller midi controller keyboard and virtual synth software unless you want to go old school and by a real synthesizer (for those sounds I own have a Roland Juno 106  that I bought in the mid 80's and an early 80's Korg Polysix but I haven't even turned them on in about 15 years or probably longer. I wonder if they even work anymore).

Collecting dust in my basement.  
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 16, 2017,
#4
Rickholly74 

Wow thanks for the reply.
 

I don' t know much about them to be honest, but I would like to do both if that's possible? I love the piano but I've never had one. I will have to see what they do in Crsyal Castles, Protomen, but also Muse. 
#5
If you have a Mac you can get a cheap like 4 octave keyboard and work with the MIDI sounds in GarageBand. That's what I use for all my non-guitar instruments in my RN link below. Maybe people think they sound good or bad, but they get the notes through speakers. You can actually get a pretty good variety of MIDI sounds from GarageBand, and some are pretty cool, it's mostly just the editing interface that really obnoxious (and the software guitar effects). If you're doing things to the click, it's pretty straightforward to track MIDI.

To get into using keyboards and MIDI, I'd recommend just approaching the keyboard in the traditional way, just as you would guitar. You need -some- technique on the keyboard, unless you want to do a take for every single note or phrase, and then go back and fix all your rhythmic errors. You also need to have some chords at the ready, because it's a huge pain in the ass to record big fancy chords that you can't hit accurately. Rhythmic ability on the keyboard is also pretty important - there are some times you want everything snapped to the 16th note grid, but you should be able to sound natural when you want to. 

Basically, if you want to play keyboards... play keyboards. Doing some basic jazz will probably help you get the appropriate chord vocabulary for most modern music. Practice some scales and chords and songs and then get recording.
#6
When you are looking to buy a keyboard there are a lot of variables. My advice would be buy used. A lot of people buy keyboards for goofing around or parents buy them for their kids hoping they will learn to play (and they don't) so there are lots of decent used keys out there. Just make sure it has midi in and out ports which most do. If it doesn't have midi ports it's a pretty good sign that it is not a serious keyboard so no matter how cheap it is, don't buy it. I know in my area I often see used Yamaha keys that sold new for $300-400 for well under $100 and outside of not having weighted keys will do the basic 127 instrument sounds fairly well. Good way to get started. 

Note: If you do buy used, make sure it comes with the correct power supply. Somehow that always seems to be lost or not available. 
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#8
Rickholly74 

I can pick things up pretty quickly and am very disciplined and committing to learning and already have stronger fingers from playing guitars, and as well some prior musical knowledge. This wouldn't make a difference at all?

I read this read, and when people say, "just buy some random keyboards used" are they saying that as a write off or kind of in a discouraging tone? because it feels like that to me, though maybe I am just being paranoid. 

I suppose I do not know very much on the technical aspect of piano's though. I suppose maybe a better suggestion or thread topic would be "advice on what to look into for those looking to start learning how to play the Keyboard/electronic piano's and synth's" *sigh*

Man, I totally forgot Matt Bellamy uses a regular piano now, I know when he first started Muse they only used Keyboard's. I think Crystal Castle's uses Keyboards and Synth's at the same time though. 
Last edited by tear2slitwrists at May 3, 2017,
#9
Quote by Rickholly74
Are you looking for piano (88 keys) and traditional keyboard sounds or a synth to create unusual sounds? There is a huge difference between the two. I use midi a lot to create song files and backing tracks. For that I use a full size Yamaha keyboard with midi capabilities into a computer that has a software Roland TTS sound module. If you are looking for for synth sounds you should be looking into a smaller midi controller keyboard and virtual synth software unless you want to go old school and by a real synthesizer (for those sounds I own have a Roland Juno 106  that I bought in the mid 80's and an early 80's Korg Polysix but I haven't even turned them on in about 15 years or probably longer. I wonder if they even work anymore).

Collecting dust in my basement.  

So...Why a smaller midi keyboard though? why does size or the amount of keys available matter?

Since they are digital, are you able to somehow adjust the scales and pitches electronically? I have gotten pretty good at the guitar and I don't really need to get that much better. When I play the guitar now, it's mostly just for jamming or coming up with things on my own. I realized that, I would like to move into learning other instruments because I am still curious and feel like learning :/ (thinking about learning to get better at the bass as well) 

Are the extra keys just considered optional or only for serious musicians? I noticed that keyboards come in different sizes, I have always fooled around with them at music stores, lol : O
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-zHchdlJEVB8/UXIfwc8cDHI/AAAAAAAADyo/VpppA8vG830/s1600/Korg+SP280-4.JPG

I want like, the full length and keys. 
Last edited by tear2slitwrists at May 3, 2017,
#10
This whole world is a little new to me. I am vaguely familiar with it all, but ti's a little overwhelming. All the terms and stuff, i wish there was some kind of a flowchart. 
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/52r8Exk8UX4/hqdefault.jpg\
https://aestheticmag.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/crystalcastles-7-copy.jpg

Like these themselves are "synth's" only? are they taken seriously in the music world or are they even that necessary? 
http://www.vintagesynth.com/korg/korg_er1_angle_lg.jpg
I have played around with them before, and they are really fun. 
Last edited by tear2slitwrists at May 3, 2017,
#11
Quote by cdgraves
If you have a Mac you can get a cheap like 4 octave keyboard and work with the MIDI sounds in GarageBand. That's what I use for all my non-guitar instruments in my RN link below. Maybe people think they sound good or bad, but they get the notes through speakers. You can actually get a pretty good variety of MIDI sounds from GarageBand, and some are pretty cool, it's mostly just the editing interface that really obnoxious (and the software guitar effects). If you're doing things to the click, it's pretty straightforward to track MIDI.

To get into using keyboards and MIDI, I'd recommend just approaching the keyboard in the traditional way, just as you would guitar. You need -some- technique on the keyboard, unless you want to do a take for every single note or phrase, and then go back and fix all your rhythmic errors. You also need to have some chords at the ready, because it's a huge pain in the ass to record big fancy chords that you can't hit accurately. Rhythmic ability on the keyboard is also pretty important - there are some times you want everything snapped to the 16th note grid, but you should be able to sound natural when you want to. 

Basically, if you want to play keyboards... play keyboards. Doing some basic jazz will probably help you get the appropriate chord vocabulary for most modern music. Practice some scales and chords and songs and then get recording.

whoa, those actually all sound pretty good. Yeah, I looked up "gear" for Crystal castles and to my surprise they mostly use a mac and some old casio apparently. Is it really that simple or easy to translate live with only a laptop?

I've been listening to musicians playing Korgs, and I so far like that brand quite a bit actually.

What does it mean "backing on a laptop" ?? does this mean pre-recorded "samples" or written pieces played in-sync with whatever the keyboardist or DJ is playing/doing?
Last edited by tear2slitwrists at May 3, 2017,