#1
Hey guys,

I was playing a song today and had the chord I was playing described as a 10 chord. G10 specifically. It's not a voicing I'm familiar with and looking for the theory behind it. The chord shape is very familiar is just a 1-3-3 chord. I've always just reffered to it is a major without the 5th. Is 10 the proper name for this chord?

Thanks,
Kevin
#2
theEmbark
No, there's no such thing as a 10 chord. Could it be it was supposed to be a G in 10th position?
With 1-3-3 do you mean the fingering, or the voicing - root, third, third? If it's the former then was the chord x 10 12 12 x x ?
That would be a G5 in 10th position, G5 being a G (could be either major or minor) without the 3rd.
#3
Well the 10th is the same note as the third, so it seems a little redundant, but I'd say it's to indicate the doubled third. I can't say I've ever seen such a chord indicated, though. If you told someone to "play a 10th chord", they'd probably wonder just what you meant to do differently. Many standard voicings place the 3rd a 10th above the root, so the label '10' would be a little confusing without context. I certainly wouldn't assume it to mean doubled third and no 5th.

Many times there's no proper name for a chord, because you can't account for every single voicing with generic names. At some point, it's understood that if the composer wants a specific voicing, they have to spell it out.  Plus if the voicing is spelled out anyway, there's no purpose in coming up with a special name for it. And not every moment of music needs to be analyzed as a chord.

In short, this is just G, and the composer has a specific voicing indicated.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 17, 2017,
#5
Quote by cdgraves
Well the 10th is the same note as the third, so it seems a little redundant, but I'd say it's to indicate the doubled third. I can't say I've ever seen such a chord indicated, though. If you told someone to "play a 10th chord", they'd probably wonder just what you meant to do differently. Many standard voicings place the 3rd a 10th above the root, so the label '10' would be a little confusing without context. I certainly wouldn't assume it to mean doubled third and no 5th.

Many times there's no proper name for a chord, because you can't account for every single voicing with generic names. At some point, it's understood that if the composer wants a specific voicing, they have to spell it out.  Plus if the voicing is spelled out anyway, there's no purpose in coming up with a special name for it. And not every moment of music needs to be analyzed as a chord.

In short, this is just G, and the composer has a specific voicing indicated.


You picked up on what I was trying to communicate :-). Yeah I wasn't providing tablature. Just scale degrees.

That makes sense I didn't think thru it that way but yeah, in 10 scale degrees you have 2 thirds.

I agree with you it's just a G if I was teaching it to someone I'd probably just call it a G without the 5th.

Just was curious,

Thanks for clarifying,
Kevin
#6
Quote by jerrykramskoy
theEmbark Can't say for sure unless you provide the string/frets.  ... I assume you don't mean the following chord (F5), but if you write down in this format, it's clearer.

e: x
b: x
g: x
d: 3
a: 3
e: 1


if this is the voicing..why/how would it be called a 10th without the third of the chord..
play well

wolf
#7
I'm pretty sure the x-10-12-12-x-x analysis NSpen1 suggested is the answer. It's most likely that the whole context within the actual song makes it major, since the guitar is only playing the root and fifth.
#9
Quote by NeoMvsEu
I'm pretty sure the x-10-12-12-x-x analysis NSpen1 suggested is the answer. It's most likely that the whole context within the actual song makes it major, since the guitar is only playing the root and fifth.

Yeah, that's what I thought, but theEmbark says it has two thirds and no fifth, in which case it would be something like
x-10-9-x-12-x or 32x4xx
#10
The actual chords are:
e: x -- x -- x -- x
b: x -- x -- x -- x
g: 4 -- 11 - 7 -- 6
d: x -- x -- x - x
a: 2 -- 9 -- 5 -- 4
e: 3 -- 10 -- 7 -- 5

G major - D major - B minor - A major

I believe CDgraves is correct here. These are being referred to as 10 chords because they contain 2 3rds.

The root note the third scale note and the 10th scale note (also another 3rd).

I've heard this enough now where I wouldn't say a 10 chord 'doesn't exist' I would say it's an uncommon way of verablizing the above chords with the 10 years of theory I have behind me.

Lots of different ways to name chords at the end of the day.

Thanks,
Kevin
#11
Quote by theEmbark
Hey guys,

I was playing a song today and had the chord I was playing described as a 10 chord. G10 specifically. It's not a voicing I'm familiar with and looking for the theory behind it. The chord shape is very familiar is just a 1-3-3 chord. I've always just reffered to it is a major without the 5th. Is 10 the proper name for this chord?

Thanks,
Kevin

As explained, the "10" figure  derives form the interval between the root and the upper 3rd, which is a 10th - octave plus 3rd, or compound 3rd.  Arguably, adding the lower 3rd too makes it a "chord", hence the chord symbol.  
As for it being a "proper" name, it does make sense, although it's unconventional.  I've never seen it in 50 years of playing guitar.  (Except in more complex chords like 7b10, which is the old name for the 7#9 chord, containing a major 3rd below and minor 3rd in the octave above.)

10ths are pretty common intervals in baroque music, and some fingerstyle guitar - "Blackbird" being the most famous example, but the 10ths in that don't include the lower 3rd as well (just a repeated G tonic as the 10ths move around).
#12
... Okay, I get why the extension was used, but the extra explanation that's required to make sense of dyads with "fancy" names, imo: