#1
I want to record electric guitar at the same time as vocals as it would save a lot of time on recording. I've tried recording both tracks at once before (voice>mic>interface>DAW track1, strat>pedal>interface>DAW track2) and it seemed pretty practical except I could hear the tinny little sound of the electric guitar strings bleeding into the vocal mic recording. I was using an AT2035 hypercardioid LD condenser mic which I understand should only be picking up sound within a small range of space, but it is also a fairly sensitive mic.

Is there any type of mic I could buy that would let me record vocals while I also play electric guitar without picking up the sound of the strings?
#2
Don't use a condenser - use an sm58 or something similar ( unidirectional dynamic mic)- it will pick up less of the guitar ( that's why they've been used since the 60's for concerts). I do this all the time and it works well. The sm58 is the best bang for your buck - it's still used on professional albums on occasion and it's still the defacto standard on every concert stage in the world because it rejects sound so well. 

There will always be some bleed, but you can really minimize it this way.  
#3
I disagree, personally.  I'd sooner have a tiny bit of pinkety-plink of electric guitar strings and capture my voice with the AT2035 than record my vocal with an SM58.  (depending on the voice and singer.... I've actually had it happen - once - where after trying a whole bunch of other mics, that the SM58 was a perfect fit for the singer).  Mixed in the song, you won't hear the electric guitar strings pinking away in the background.

However, looking at the polar plot of the microphone.... http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/wired_mics/cebb57a269d232ee/

You can probably minimize this a little.  Notice how the best rejection is at about the 5:00 and 7:00 positions (relative to the on-axis of the mic being the 12:00 position).  

Angle the mic such that the on-axis angle of the mic is pointing to the singer's mouth, while the 5:00 or 7:00 position of the mic is pointing at the guitar strings.  That is where you'll get the best rejection.

And as I say... a teeny bit of plinking of electric guitar strings in the background shouldn't be a deal-breaker for a lead vocal once you get it in the mix.

There are other solutions that involve getting other mics (like a figure-8 pattern mic, or a hypercardiod dynamic mic better suited for vocals.... like a Sennheiser MD441 or even a Shure SM7), but my suggestion should be a good start.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Agree mostly with Chris.  A little bleed is a non issue if you use a good mic and get great vocals.  Every platinum recording over the last 50 years has mic bleed somewhere.  To minimize it I would try pointing the mic "on axis" up and sing over the top.  This should give you the maximum rejection of guitar strings.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Apr 18, 2017,
#6
The post is about sound rejection, not getting the best vocal sound with bleed - he wants to minimize bleed and a dynamic mic like an sm58, or sm7 etc, is world's better than an AT2035. I'm not a fan of any cheap condenser, including the AT2035  -  it sounds shrill, as they all do. In nearly any case I prefer a dynamic over a cheap condenser, but context matters and the room as well.

A vocal track with guitar bleed is going to sound worse than one without it. The reason is that once you start compressing and really processing the vocal, the bleed will be amplified drastically. So what may start a slight bleed, ends up ruining your options on properly compressing your vocal.   Room noise is the same issue - even a slight amount will corrupt an entire track once you start applying fx. 
#7
Well...there are sound rejection filters as well, he could put one down facing the guitar. Personally, I'll track the vocal with dynamic, which will become my throw away track, and I'll go over the vocal separately.

If you want to do one take only, the best thing is probably to learn to live with bleed and do edits on the whole take as needed on the composite vocal and guitar track. In other words do say 5 full takes, then pick the best moments in each and make a composite from the whole mix.
#8
Quote by reverb66
The post is about sound rejection, not getting the best vocal sound with bleed 

On the surface, perhaps, but I think if we were to dig deeper, the intention is to get the best recording possible.  Although neither would be my first, second, third, or even fifth choice, I would take a cheap condenser over an SM58 for a vocal track pretty much any day.  (With the noted exception that I mentioned above.). Yes, it does depend on the room, the singer, context, etc.  

I would take a little bleed with plucky electric guitar strings way in the background in a cheap condenser before I would use an SM58 with no bleed at all.  However, angling the condenser so that the electric guitar strings are in the null of the mic will minimize that considerably.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.