#1
So recently I decided to start playing guitar. I bought a Jackson j-22 dinky. It has humbuckers. I would like to know how well reverb will do with the humbuckers. I was thinking of going to return it and get a squier strat, but is that necessary for reverb or will I do just fine with the humbuckers? 
#2
reverb is an effect that has nothing to do with pickups. humbuckers will work fine. 
#3
Humbuckers make the guitar not do an "hum" sound through the amp, noticeable mostly with heavier gain. It occurs as the pickups receive external magnetic waves such as from near electronics; humbuckers "cut" that signal.

On the other hand, as monwobobbo metioned, reverb is an effect that creates and echo similar to what you hear on a large room, so things are not related with each other.
'07 Jackson Pro Dinky DK2M (MIJ)
Squier Strat SE
Marshall Valvestate VS15R practice amp
#4
None of my business, but just wondering if you just started playing why is reverb so important.
Flying in a blue dream
Last edited by SanDune65 at Apr 18, 2017,
#5
First off, reverb sounds great with humbuckers or single coils. It's an effect.

Second, I think you're confusing "reverb" for " good clean tone" - you should  really  take a step back and figure out what kind of music you want to play - if you're primarily playing cleaner songs ( Blues, Funk, Rock, Pop, Country, Jazz etc.) , then a Strat is way better suited for those styles, but if you're primarily playing Metal with heavy distortion, then the Jackson will be better suited.  The Strat is much more flexible overall and I would recommend it generally over any Jackson unless you plan on playing metal almost exclusively.
#6
I love reverb and almost always have a little bit on to give a fuller sound.  All of my guitars except one have humbuckers.  It sounds great (to me).  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
Quote by SanDune65
None of my business, but just wondering if you just started playing why is reverb so important.


Don't worry, I've got this. Reverb is important mostly because it gives more "space" to your sound. It can make your guitar sound like it's in a large space, or used very subtly as a way of giving just slightly more depth to the sound. It also helps with sustain a bit.

A nice reverb can make a clean sound sound much more full. That's why Fenders are known for their clean sound; they have good cleans, and great reverb, which makes them sound exelent. This lets you get "fat" clean tones without having to use a bit ov overdrive, which is good for genres like Surf and Country (a lot more than that, but those were the first to come to mind).

You can also use it to get a really strange effect with distortion, such as the intro to Sweet Child o' Mine. I think it's Welcome Home (Sanatarium) that also had that effect in the intro.

I think I got the main ones down. In short, reverb is important (says the one that doesn't own anything with reverb and instead sets a delay to sound like a reverb).
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#8
On the subject of reverb, it's a primary effect as far as I'm concerned,  with one exception -  high gain rhythm tone. 

"A guitar tone is only as good as it's reverb" - you can take that quote to the bank! 
#9
Quote by reverb66
On the subject of reverb, it's a primary effect as far as I'm concerned,  with one exception -  high gain rhythm tone. 

"A guitar tone is only as good as it's reverb" - you can take that quote to the bank! 


Of course the person named reverb66 would say that reverb is important! I'm still not disagreeing, just pointing it out.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#11
Quote by reverb66
On the subject of reverb, it's a primary effect as far as I'm concerned,  with one exception -  high gain rhythm tone. 

"A guitar tone is only as good as it's reverb" - you can take that quote to the bank! 

Agreed,  high gain rhythm sounds like a muddy mess with a lot of reverb.   You want those riffs nice and tight.  A lot of reverb = not tight.  For everything else you can pretty much leave the reverb always on.