#1
Hi everybody. I've bought a brand new 2017 Taylor 114ce accoustic guitar. It's perfect in the store, but the problem appear when few days later i recognized there a sort of noise sound when plug it to any device and if i touch the jack or connector metal surface, the noise is totally stop.

Could any one explain what is the problem is?
If there anyone also got this problem with Taylor accoustic guitar?
What can i do to solve this?

Forgive my English. Thank you all.
Last edited by Chanvodibo at Apr 18, 2017,
#2
This type of noise is normal and unfortunately there isn't a lot that can be done about it.  Your body acts as an antenna for stray waves in the air.  The noise is created when the waves and electricity attracted by and stored in your body jumps to the guitar's and is fed to your amp.  If you touch something on a guitar that is grounded the noise is sent to ground and you don't hear it.  When you are not touching something that is grounded a larger portion of noise jumps to the hot signal.  This is why the noise is louder when you are not touching the metal parts of your guitar.

If you need to reduce the noise the best thing to do is to make sure you don't have any electronics running that create electrical noise in your environment.  I have found that my microwave is the number one cause of electrical noise in my home.  My TV, florescent lights (including energy saving light bulbs) and my refrigerator are also huge contributors to extra noise.  If I do any recording I have to unplug these devices for the duration of my recording.

You can also get noise introduced through the power lines in your home but that noise won't go away when you touch the strings.  That noise can be reduced by unplugging appliances and/or by using a power conditioner.  A power conditioner is basically an electrical transformer with a 1/1 ratio.  This will let AC electricity go to your amp but DC electricity is stopped.  Stripping away the DC electricity also strips away most of the noise introduced via your homes electrical lines.  Unfortunately power conditioners are expensive and unaffordable for most of us.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Apr 18, 2017,
#3
If the noise is a hum, you could have a bad cable. The input jack, if dirty, sometimes causes an electrical crackling noise, as will 'the wires starting to break in a cable end. (Bend the wire just behind the plug to check).
Generally speaking, acoustic electric guitars are fairly quiet with respect to ingesting noise from their surroundings. The preamp raises the signal above the noise threshold before it reaches the amp.

That notwithstanding, if the problem is  "worst" when you're not playing, you can place a "noise gate" pedal in the line between the guitar and amp.

Keep in mind the more you crank up the treble, the more noise manifests itself.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 18, 2017,
#4
I have used an earthing strip in that situation. - A strip of brass with holes in it that sits under the bridge pin holes so that the string balls touch it, eg a Stewmac Platemate. It is earthed to the socket. This earths the strings, and the noise stops when you touch them.
#5
Thank you all, guys. Finally, because of moiture. I live in Southeast Asia, where the average moiture alway over 70%. In those days, it was rainning. If i keep the guitar in a case every after dried the case with hair dryer, it would reduce the hum and also improve the guitar action significantly.

Quote by CorduroyEW
This type of noise is normal and unfortunately there isn't a lot that can be done about it.  Your body acts as an antenna for stray waves in the air.  The noise is created when the waves and electricity attracted by and stored in your body jumps to the guitar's and is fed to your amp.  If you touch something on a guitar that is grounded the noise is sent to ground and you don't hear it.  When you are not touching something that is grounded a larger portion of noise jumps to the hot signal.  This is why the noise is louder when you are not touching the metal parts of your guitar.

If you need to reduce the noise the best thing to do is to make sure you don't have any electronics running that create electrical noise in your environment.  I have found that my microwave is the number one cause of electrical noise in my home.  My TV, florescent lights (including energy saving light bulbs) and my refrigerator are also huge contributors to extra noise.  If I do any recording I have to unplug these devices for the duration of my recording.

You can also get noise introduced through the power lines in your home but that noise won't go away when you touch the strings.  That noise can be reduced by unplugging appliances and/or by using a power conditioner.  A power conditioner is basically an electrical transformer with a 1/1 ratio.  This will let AC electricity go to your amp but DC electricity is stopped.  Stripping away the DC electricity also strips away most of the noise introduced via your homes electrical lines.  Unfortunately power conditioners are expensive and unaffordable for most of us.


Yep. It still have a little noise when i run every device togeter, especially my air condition. I'll remind that thank you!

Quote by Captaincranky
If the noise is a hum, you could have a bad cable. The input jack, if dirty, sometimes causes an electrical crackling noise, as will 'the wires starting to break in a cable end. (Bend the wire just behind the plug to check).
Generally speaking, acoustic electric guitars are fairly quiet with respect to ingesting noise from their surroundings. The preamp raises the signal above the noise threshold before it reaches the amp.

That notwithstanding, if the problem is  "worst" when you're not playing, you can place a "noise gate" pedal in the line between the guitar and amp.

Keep in mind the more you crank up the treble, the more noise manifests itself.


My cable is too old and bad quality, i will buy a new Morganmy cable and jack to improve the sound also reduce the hum if it exist again.