#1
Ok question for the stereo pedal peeps:

I have a tc electronic HOF mini reverb. I want to move to a stereo setup (with a stereo delay before the verb).

Question is if I bought another hof mini and sent the left to one and the right to the other would that be the same as running the larger HOF in stereo?

I.e. Is there any signal crosstalk between channels when using stereo input reverbs? Or do they treat each channel separately?

Thanks!
#2
Quote by Tune my fork
Ok question for the stereo pedal peeps:

I have a tc electronic HOF mini reverb. I want to move to a stereo setup (with a stereo delay before the verb).

Question is if I bought another hof mini and sent the left to one and the right to the other would that be the same as running the larger HOF in stereo?

I.e. Is there any signal crosstalk between channels when using stereo input reverbs? Or do they treat each channel separately?

Thanks!
No. What you would end up with is really dual mono if you use the same settings on each HOF mini. Imagine you reduce a stereo mp3 to only one of the channels- either the left or right. But you played that one channel through both sides. You're getting two lefts, OR two rights. True stereo imaging involves something different being sent to the left than what is sent to the right. Now you could use a different setting on one of the HOF minis- like say a hall reverb left, and slapback right. Although I am not sure how great that would sound.

Crosstalk is a thing with pretty much any audio device, but I doubt it will be noticeable at all.
#3
Quote by Will Lane
No. What you would end up with is really dual mono if you use the same settings on each HOF mini. Imagine you reduce a stereo mp3 to only one of the channels- either the left or right. But you played that one channel through both sides. You're getting two lefts, OR two rights. True stereo imaging involves something different being sent to the left than what is sent to the right. Now you could use a different setting on one of the HOF minis- like say a hall reverb left, and slapback right. Although I am not sure how great that would sound.

Crosstalk is a thing with pretty much any audio device, but I doubt it will be noticeable at all.


I think we are talking across purposes, I do have different signals on left & right as the stereo delay generates a stereo signal from a mono input.
I have since confirmed that most good stereo input reverbs do purposefully bleed the LR channels into eachother as opposed to treating them individually. (Like a true acoustic space with two sound sources & two microphones)
#4
It depends on their design.  Some intentionally mix channels and some are discrete 2 channel stereo reverb.  Choose the design that best meets your needs.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Cajundaddy Yeah cheers. I find that information very hard to find. It's either buried in a manual or i have to find a forum where it's stated.
#6
For what you want to do, std foot pedals might be the wrong tools.  A Lexi rack unit like this might be a better choice with complete flexibility, tap delay, reverb, dynamic compression, and footswitch control:
https://www.amazon.com/Lexicon-MX200-Stereo-Effects-Processor/dp/B0009W0BDA

What would John Mayer do?
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY