#1
I was listening to a soundcheck of a Bon Jovi show on youtube and the guitars sound like they are being played through a cheap amp.



Why is that ? Is this recording pulled from the soundboard ?
#2
The guitar does sound lousy, but that is the modern sound; there will be a full stacked rack of processing for the guitar even before it gets to the engineer, then another rack of processing... compressed, filtered, noise gated, EQ'ed, the signal is probably converted from analog to digital and back to analog a dozen times... the life is gone, but super loud concert levels require control.

The noise is horrible... sounds like the interference of the environmentally profound low energy flourowhatsit lighting.

But to answer "The difference between a soundcheck and the gig ?", that's easy. Most amps have two inputs for a channel (Fender labels them #1 and #2) where the second one is quieter (Fender #2 inputs are -6dB which means they reduce input signal level to half voltage).
So during sound check you use #2 to fool the engineer, then during performance you switch to #1 so you can hear and cut through!
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#3
I don't think it sounds like a cheap amp.

It's probably not the sound from the soundboard because the overall sound lacks definition (if it was from the soundboard, you could hear each instrument a lot clearer). You can also hear them talk (if it was recorded straight from the soundboard, you couldn't hear them talk unless they talked to a microphone) and you can hear the natural reverb of the venue which to me suggests that it was recorded on an external recorder, most likely placed in front of the guitar amp because the guitar seems to sound way louder than anything else, and also, the noise coming from the guitar amp is pretty loud.

If that was the soundboard audio, then I couldn't imagine how bad it would sound like to the audience.
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#4
Yeah that's some sort of ambient recording, not through the soundboard. The soundcheck is where they get the whole sound system balanced and stuff, so the end of the soundcheck should sound exactly like the beginning of the show.
Quote by PlusPaul
But to answer "The difference between a soundcheck and the gig ?", that's easy. Most amps have two inputs for a channel (Fender labels them #1 and #2) where the second one is quieter (Fender #2 inputs are -6dB which means they reduce input signal level to half voltage).
So during sound check you use #2 to fool the engineer, then during performance you switch to #1 so you can hear and cut through!

Of course the joke's on you when they turn you 8 in the monitors and 1 in the mains!
#5
There is also some serious compression and gating going on. Note that the minute he starts playing the guitar a lot of the hiss disappears. It doesn't sound like cheap amps to me and I'm sure it isn't. Also this doesn't seem like a sound check at all but more like the guitar tech and drum tech setting up. 
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 21, 2017,
#6
Two things:

1) That's a terrible recording, clearly poorly recorded in of itself, so you can't the sound quality of what was actually heard on stage based on that.

2) "stage sound" and the sound the audience actually hears are two completely different things.  The larger the stage, the larger the difference.  I've played shows on festival stages where the sound was complete shit on stage,but sounded great out in the audience. It depends on the context and depends on whether you have a dedicated engineer to mix  for the stage sound ( Bon Jovi obviously would). In my experience, it's rare to have great stage sound because it's the last thing the sound engineer cares about - he's busy trying to ensure things are optimal out in the audience.