#1
Which do our experts think would be better to gig with at gigs of 50-200 people...Ashdown 4x10 with 600 Mag head or 2 seperate 1x15 cabs with the same 600 head....i realise the bigger speakers will move more air about and the amp head is certainly powerful enough for the volume side of it...currently have a 1x15 and a 4x10 but looking to scale down to 2 1x15s or a 1x15 and a 2x12 cab...just wondering if i'll still get the same sort of performance and volume level as the head and the 4x10 cab
#2
If you want punch, you need 10" speakers.  If you want deep low end, you need 15" speakers.  I'd go with the AAA-300-210-T Ashdown cabinet.  Drop that on top of a 1x15" and you'd be set for almost any gig.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
Quote by FatalGear41
If you want punch, you need 10" speakers.  If you want deep low end, you need 15" speakers.  I'd go with the AAA-300-210-T Ashdown cabinet.  Drop that on top of a 1x15" and you'd be set for almost any gig.


You can still very much get deep low end with 10s. Excursion, port size/geometry, cabinet volume are all just as important. We produce a speaker with 4x6.25" very light, very shallow bass drivers, which go to 40Hz (+/-3dB) and as far down as 32Hz(+/-6dB). And that bass is phenomenal. Ashdown do a slim version of a 15" speaker cab which loses 5Hz on the frequency response of the standard sized cab. There's a lot more than just speaker size involved, I think we need to be less simplistic.
#4
What company produces such a 10" speaker?  Is it your company?  Ever since SWR folded, I've been looking for some that do more than just provide punch.  I've had good luck (somewhat) with ElectroVoice speakers, but not with a lot of other ones.  Sounds like a good idea.

I didn't mean to be over-simplistic, but by and large, 10" speakers are for the punch/cut through the mix, and 15" speakers are for the earth-shaking low end.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
I'd love to get our drivers in a bass cab. Probably won't happen anytime soon.

Our top end subwoofer only uses two 9" drivers, in a 23l box, outputs 110dB and starts rolling off at 23Hz.

Yeah, bass is more woofer than subwoofer, but they can handle in excess of 500w each and are designed to deal with huge transients.
Last edited by Deliriumbassist at Apr 22, 2017,
#6
Quote by FatalGear41


I didn't mean to be over-simplistic, but by and large, 10" speakers are for the punch/cut through the mix, and 15" speakers are for the earth-shaking low end.

That's WAY over simplistic. And wildly inaccurate. 

A speaker cabinet using a 10" Eminence Kappalite 3010LF crossed over to a mids driver and an HF driver will produce exactly the same frequency distribution as a speaker cabinet using a 15" version of the same  LF driver. The differences will be in overall volume and power handling. There are designs using a single or a pair of 8" LF drivers that support double bass and go well below most manufacturers' 4x10 or 1x15 offerings. 

Another inaccuracy is the whole "move more air" thing. Speakers move a *volume* of air that has to do with TWO things - cone area and excursion. Based solely on cone area, a single 15 will NOT keep up with a 4x10 in terms of moving air. When you figure cone area, by the way, be sure that you factor in the elimination of the surround.  You'll see a lot of "tables" making that mistake. 

The 4x10 and 1x15 designs you're thinking about date from 30-40 years ago, and are built today by manufacturers largely because it's dirt cheap for them and expected as traditional kit by unsophisticated bass players who listen with their eyes. 
#7
Here's a review on a more modern cabinet (with a passing comparison to a 4x10) that features a single 12" LF driver (3012LF), a 5" Faital Pro mids and a 1" Faital HF driver. It weighs 32 pounds and is being driven with 1200W of power. I should note (in the interest of bias) that I have a pair of the larger F115s, both of which feature a 15" LF driver with similar mids/HF drivers.

 http://www.bassplayer.com/gear/1164/greenboy-audio-fearless-f112-cabinet-reviewed/48331

#8
Quote by tedred
Which do our experts think would be better to gig with at gigs of 50-200 people...Ashdown 4x10 with 600 Mag head or 2 seperate 1x15 cabs with the same 600 head....i realise the bigger speakers will move more air about and the amp head is certainly powerful enough for the volume side of it...currently have a 1x15 and a 4x10 but looking to scale down to 2 1x15s or a 1x15 and a 2x12 cab...just wondering if i'll still get the same sort of performance and volume level as the head and the 4x10 cab

A 4x10 cab will move more air than a single 15" cab.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#9
Quote by John Swift
A 4x10 cab will move more air than a single 15" cab.

Depends on the 10's, depends on the 15. 

In terms of cone area alone, a 4x10 is bigger. 
But a 15" with a large Vmax can overtake and pass a lot of 4x10s in terms of moving air. 
#10
To the OP:

Surface area.

Excursion.

Cubic Feet.

Port size.

Power Handling.


Many variables to deal with to be specific in response to the question.

I will dispense will all of these because you are using an Ashdown product. World class gear will not be over scrutinized by me, only rolled on to the stage.

In assigning simplistic values to drivers 8"=8 10'=10 etc, 4x10 v. 1x15 is 40 v. 15.

Assuming these numbers corresponding to my use of 4 12"ers and 1200 watts to an open field and fighting against the rest of the band who was in the 2200-2500 watt PA, my volume knob at about 11 o'clock...my number was 48 v. what you would have in a 410 and 115 as 56.

Just that number alone shows move to a second 15 is not going to address your desire.

It is a fact that the 12" cabinets that I was using were called the smallest 15" cabinets ever made, because they reached low and delivered the goods. 

If one of the cabinets with the 115 you are already using will pull more power from the amp, that is the cabinet that will give you what you need in the venue.

As for power, if I was using not even 600watts and 48 inches to drive an open field and shock the guitarist who went out with a wireless, you using 600 watts and 55 inches will be in values louder than I was, and definitely over the top for a 200 person venue. 

I suggest the only thing that you MIGHT and I mean MIGHT notice between the 4x10 and the 115 is a personal tone preference.

The reason I use 12's is that I never really loved 15's.  They just never sang to me, and when a Pall Bearer of Cliff Burton's told me I needed to play for people again I looked for an amp that had a Solid State Preamp and Power Section, cabinet of Balitic Birch, was over 250 watts, and did not have a 15" because I was going to have to be able to transport it in an Accord. So, the 12 was the obvious choice and I resigned myself to just dealing with any limitations it might pose to a 5 string.  There were none.

I suggests always erring on the side of Watts. Tone can always be shaped to cut out the mud and slice through the mix.  But you cannot create more watts in the middle of a gig.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
Last edited by Sliide90027 at Apr 23, 2017,
#11
dspellman Of course it does but we're assuming that we're refering to speakers both designed for a particilar application.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#12
There are too many variants to provide a complete answer, yesterdays answers refer to yesterdays technology. With manufacturers the speakers and amps are often designed to work together if you want optimum performance out of either.
Some years ago Peavey produced an extremely compact and lite for the time 15" 400 watt bass combo 'Databass' in reality the bass/bottom end was limited in the design of the preamp section otherwhise the speaker wouldn't have lasted 5 minutes.
Manufacturers of ampllifiers give the loudspeaker producers a spec for the speakers that they require.
In the 70s I started building my own cabs due to gaining access to a loudspeaker factory, it was then that I realised just how much the nameplate on the speaker grille costs, a perfect example being a certain compnys pair of 2x12"+horn cost less than £80 to produce yet the retail was £292 for the pair.
So inreality ther is no one answer.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#13
Quote by FatalGear41
What company produces such a 10" speaker?  Is it your company?  Ever since SWR folded, I've been looking for some that do more than just provide punch.  I've had good luck (somewhat) with ElectroVoice speakers, but not with a lot of other ones.  Sounds like a good idea.

I didn't mean to be over-simplistic, but by and large, 10" speakers are for the punch/cut through the mix, and 15" speakers are for the earth-shaking low end.

Well I've been quite shocked when hearing the depth and power turned out by ten and twelve inch loudspeakrs recently especially those from the Markbass amplification range, having owned and used many brands, designs etc over 55 years of gigging I finaly settled on a 1x15 Markbass Combo 15 months ago andI couldn't be happier (so is my back).
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn