#1
Hey

I feel that when I pick, there's too much contact between my pick and the string, which slows me down and effects the speed of my picking, and the next stroke

For example if you take the picking for Thunderstruck, there's no way I could pick that fast

How do you pick fluidly so that your pick glides across strings effortlessly without getting caught inbetween the strings?

Cheers
#2
You could try holding the pick closer to the point so less of it is sticking out past your fingers.  But your issue could also be a problem with your picking technique itself, not how you're holding the pick.  Some pictures and/or a video would be helpful.

And "the picking for Thunderstruck".  Which part?  If you're talking about the intro, that's all legato.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#3
Quote by Junior#1
And "the picking for Thunderstruck".  Which part?  If you're talking about the intro, that's all legato.

That's incorrect. The studio recording is entirely alternate picked.
#4
And live Angus has always played it picked, 4 0 7 0 4 0 7 0 etc, but thanks for the suggestion of holding the pick closer, will that effect having enough grip to then strum full chords?
#5
Well, shit.  I've been playing it wrong for the last 15 years lol.  My bad.

smithy15493 It shouldn't effect how you play chords, provided that you're not choking up on the pick too much.  
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#6
Try using a harder pick. They don't bend, so they force you to use just the tip. They work for me, I can pick a lot faster now. I don't like them for chords though, I use a medium for songs with lots of chords. 
#7
The pick has three translation dimensions (up/down, in/out, and left/right) and three rotational dimensions (about its longitudinal axis, its lateral axis, and its axis perpendicular to its plane)... that is six degrees of freedom, and all are complexly dynamically superimposed when playing. The only way to learn how to manage all this is through practice so that the fingers learn how to move the pick effortlessly and naturally.

Here is a video of exactly how to practice this. It starts off kind of slow but does make it through the Thunderstruck thing and many others. Don't just watch it; grab your guitar and pick along with it... he will talk you through everything.

The instructor, Pebber Brown is the man who taught Buckethead.

Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#8
Quote by PlusPaul
The instructor, Pebber Brown is the man who taught Buckethead.

Generally a good post, but I do take issue with this comment.  Pebber is one of the people who taught Buckethead.  He's at least also had lessons from Paul Gilbert (which you can hear in where he picks and where he uses legato in his playing and in some of the patterns he uses), and I'd bet a whole load of money that he had lessons from many other people over the years as well.

Like I say, your post is good and Pebber's material is generally all right (though I do take issue with some parts), but appealing to the authority of "this guy taught Buckethead" is kind of flawed
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#9
The important thing is the practicing; but I'm just basing the Pebber story on the Wikipedia Talk:Buckethead - Paul Gilbert and Shawn Lane Lessons section...

It's a pretty well known fact that Buckethead shared some lesson time with Paul Gilbert but to maintain that he learned all he knows or studied for any extended period of time is ludicrous. Long before he became Buckethead or met Gilbert, he was already playing in the style he does today. I find it doubtful he ever actually sat down and took lessons with Shawn Lane. For many years he studied under guitar teacher Pebber Brown who transcribed into tab a lot of Lane's material for BH. Buckethead can be heard to remind Maximum Bob in an early Young Buckethead Video to mention Pebber Brown. Maximum Bob relayed for Buckethead that "Pebber was the Master of Scales and Everything Chordal" You can find that as a source of fact on youtube. He took lessons at Styles Music in Pomona California and studied there under Johnny Fortune, Max Mcguire and Pebber Brown. You can put 2 and 2 together by watching the Young Buckethead videos and on Youtube watch the ClassX videos of him before he became BH. Pebber followed as a major player in ClassX which evolved into a group called The Radio Cowboys with Johnny Fortune.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.