#1
I was mucking around with chords and starting playing this chord progression:

Em-Am-D-G-C-F-?

After playing, I knew there was a chord missing at the end but I can't seem to find the chord...
#2
I can think of a couple of ways to end that tbh, but I really don't want to spoil things for you so I'll give you some things to think about first.

First of all, what key is this chord progression in? Hint, not all of the chords you're using are diatonic. Hint #2, you could also play two more chords after F.

Second thing you could try, is to play only the bass notes. Play E-A-D-G-C-F, and try to hear which bass note should come next. This will give you an idea about the root note for the next chord.

Third of all, if you're not familiar with the concept of keys and functional harmony, study up on that a little. It'll be a huge help with progressions like this. Also, figuring out chords in popular songs by ear helps a metric ton if you're willing to commit to it.
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#3
2 ideas.
2 more chords each.
More upbeat from F move to D and then G.
For more mellow from F move to FM and then back to C, which sounds better to me.

Is this what you had in mind?
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#4
Btw your progression (in the bass)(thx kevatuhri) is the circle of 4ths (the opposite direction or a regression of the circle of 5ths) .

The next 4th up would be a Bb major, and then a Eb, and then Ab If you keep going with this pattern it will never resolve and you need to switch it up.
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#5
Fun isn't it? Last night I was doing the same thing and running through some similar chords to yours. Rhythmic pacing of the chord changes will make a big difference in how one feels about the next chord direction... One of the most import things about constructing progressions is to take note of the good parts as soon as you hear them. When in the construction process you can have a lot of sounds bouncing around and hear something nice but then forget where or what it was before having a chance to capture and explore it.

Here is what I was playing with... I'm not finished with mine either.

Em - Csus2 - Em - Csus2
Asus2 - (F-> G -> Am) /F
Dm - Bb(7#11) - B7b13
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#7
Panasonic3, "FM" refers commonly to F major, not minor; it's clearer to use lowercase, i.e. "Fm"
opiekundps2015, "D#/C" would contain the notes C "D# F## A#", more commonly written as C Eb G Bb, i.e. Cm7

OP, do you feel a need to go back to Em after F or do you want to continue on your circle of fifths journey?
#8
NeoMvsEu 
What? Nothing you saw in mine that needs fixing or clarification? I must be learning, getting better.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#9
PlusPaul, you seem to be asking a question instead of making a statement

"(F - G - Am)/F" is a prolongation of F major, not necessarily moving to Am
F G/F Fmaj7 might be more representative of what's going on in that specific section

seems like you're ending on a V7, so up to you to either finish or deceive
#10
Well, it repeats from the beginning... still needs a bridge.. hey are you hinting deceptive cadence?
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#13
Quote by opiekundps2015
 Em-Am-D-G-C-F-?  = F# - B - Em

Why couldn't it be F-B-Em? 
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#14
Whole progression is Em-Am-D-G-C-F-F# - B - Em 
Without F# something is missing



Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Apr 23, 2017,
#16
opiekundps2015 

I don't think that anything would be missing. You could end that with simply F-Em and it would sound pretty cool. Or you could end it in any way you deem good, which is the whole point of people not giving a straight answer: because there is no straight answer. While ending the progression like that is definitely one way to do it, it's not the only way, and I'd at least like to encourage the OP to experiment with a lot of different options. There's less of an opportunity for the OP to learn something new if we just tell him "do it this way".
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#17
OscarBrown Try a barre B chord on the A string.

So Em - Am - D - G - C - F - B - - - 
as I assume each chord is played for 1 measure, play the B for 2 measures before going back to the Em.
#18
I'd probably take the easy way out with only G. Or maybe go in smaller intervals up back to the start chord: G, Am, C, Dm (which is fun since you had a D major earlier).
#25
I love chord sequences that take you in a completely different direction and shouldn't work, but do. Take for example the middle section of Radiohead's Paranoid Android. The chord sequence goes:
Cm G/B Bb A
Dm A Dm Dm/C
Bb F/A Gm F
E Esus4 A Asus4 rpt
#26
OscarBrown Reading this post question made me join UG. I have been coming to this site for years but had never joined before. A couple of replies are somewhat similar to mine but try after F doing B7 to E7. it is an old progression that Gary Moore used to experiment with.