#1
Hey all,

So, I sold my only acoustic I owned several months back (A cheapie Hohner dreadnought), with the idea of picking up something a little nicer to replace it with later on.

I've decided I want an acoustic-electric, with a cutaway, and I'm trying to narrow it down to either a concert, or a GA body type. I found the dreadnought I used to have to be a bit too big for my liking, and I didn't need such a big/deep tone (All mahogany laminate likely played a role), as nice as it sounded for an inexpensive guitar.

I'm mainly using this guitar for acoustic sections within metal songs (Both strummed and picked parts), but would also use it for random jam sessions/more folky sounding stuff too. Will the concert be too quiet/not a powerful and bright enough tone for multiple uses? (Which I'm told a GA excels at), or is it even an issue if going acoustic-electric.

I can get a good deal on a Yahma FSX model if I act fast, but I've also considered many other options in the $300-500 range (new or used). I could probably push it to $600 if I waited a bit longer. Taylor/Martin stuff likely isn't happening without selling gear/sacrificing other gear plans .

Thanks in advance for any advice!
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#2
I don't think that the body size and shape matter much, within reasonable limits, if you are always amplifying it, the quality of the pickup and/or preamp is likely to be a lot more important.

For cutting power in a purely acoustic context, dreads are likely the best bet, because of their less-complex tones - I've heard the difference in trad bluegrass settings. But between concert, GC and GA, I would choose GA for volume and cutting power. Although I like dreads, I found that the small size of a Gibson L-00 was better on a small crowded stage.
#3
That was helpful. I do have 1 more question that might help me decide.

Would a concert have trouble being heard in an all acoustic situation if there are other guitarists with dreads or GAs? Assume there are some single note/lead parts which would need to be heard over chords.

Perhaps there are also some smaller dreadnought models I could consider? I hear there tends to be size differences between models and manufacturers, even within the same body type (i.e - One brand's dreadnought might feel noticably different from anothers)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#4
It all depends how you will be playing the acoustic-electric... unplugged (just the guitar itself), plugged into an acoustic guitar amp (like Fishman Loudbox mini, Fender Acoustasonic, Ibanez Tourbadour, Marshall Acoustic amp, Crate Acoustic Amp, Peavey eCoustic, AER), or you are going direct to PA system (Tech21 acoustic DI driver) direct input..

Obviously you know there are a lots of brands and different price points.. If you can, try a Washburn comfort series or Woodline Series.. I like my Comfort series WCG18CE grand auditoriumn, its not the top model but it's has the features I like.. thinner body and contour belly cut as well as bevel cut where my arm goes.. WCG25CE, WCG55CE, WCG66CE have better features or wood. Whatever you decide.. try the guitar in the store to get a feel.. no two guitar are the same.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
Last edited by psp742 at Apr 22, 2017,
#5
I think it might come down to specifics, both the guitar and, importantly, the tonal range. Many dreads are comparatively weak in the high registers, so if you want to play electric-style leads you might well be better off with a (good!) smaller body - unlike 'grassers who are generally playing on the low frets. I would say that the same argument applies to smaller dreads - the advantages or otherwise would depend on the particular guitar and the pitch range you want. Acoustic guitars are so variable, even with the same model of some makes, that it is hard to generalise.

Another couple of things to think about:

In a jam session, being able to hear yourself is an important consideration, and a sound port can help with this. - I've done them on two of my guitars.

Resos can be very loud in the high registers, not so much on the bass strings. My cheap Republic Miniolian would have no trouble being heard in a crowd of dreads if playing electric type lead or slide.
#6
Quote by Tony Done
I don't think that the body size and shape matter much, within reasonable limits, if you are always amplifying it, the quality of the pickup and/or preamp is likely to be a lot more important.

For cutting power in a purely acoustic context, dreads are likely the best bet, because of their less-complex tones - I've heard the difference in trad bluegrass settings. But between concert, GC and GA, I would choose GA for volume and cutting power. Although I like dreads, I found that the small size of a Gibson L-00 was better on a small crowded stage.

Dreads are the best period O.o.

Serious Post: Get a Dread. Looking at your price range, I had real nice Fender Tbucket a few years back that was real nice. It is a dread but they do sound nice. The only down side is they are all laminated but they do sound good. Takamine and Fender has some nice Solid Tops around that price. 
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#7
Nothing against dreadnaught size acoustic electrics.. but the OP noted that the thicker body size makes it a bit to big for my liking (uncomfortable to play), he also note that he did not need big/deep tone.

Best advice try the acoustic electric guitar at the store... big retailers have a bunch of brands and models to choose from.. try the guitars that catch your interest and is within the budget you set.. the preamp is important so Fishman preamp is very nice.

Different brands employ same wood but the bracing and shape differ slightly.. even similar brand model and shape acoustic may sound different.. because no two instrument are alike.. you need to find the one that sounds nice to your ear. Buying online from reputed retailers is also an option but you don't get to test if you like the tone or sound the guitar makes..

Ibanez, Yamaha, Takamine, Seagull, breedlove, Alvarez, Fender, Epiphone, Washburn, (Gibson, Martin, and Taylor are slightly more money but well worth the investment).
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
Last edited by psp742 at Apr 23, 2017,
#9
i have a taylor GA style guitar and i love it. comfortable to play and has a great tone.
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#10
Don't count out the taylor 114ce you might pick one up in the top of your range used.  If you don't have to have the cutaway I am sure you can. You might get a 214ce or 114ce at $650 or less.