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#2
Fender CD60. You don't want to plug into an amp unless you have headphones. Some people will fight me on this, once you become a bit more familiar with the guitar, I'd go with a cheap Fender or Yamaha acoustic. You don't want your mistakes being amplified bro. Plus, the acoustic will develop calluses and finger strength. It hurts like hell bro making power chords and bar chords on an acoustic just starting out. My finger tips used to rip open and I would super glue them shut so I could keep playing.
#3
NewDayHappywell I already have calluses, don't know about finger strength though because my pinkie is almost always unused. Also believe it or not I don't know power chords.
#4
Quote by traie
NewDayHappywell I already have calluses, don't know about finger strength though because my pinkie is almost always unused. Also believe it or not I don't know power chords.



Learn one key at a time, my favorite key is G so I learned E minor, which is the 6th of the key of G. Basically, use the 6th minor of your favorite key and learn that minor pentatonic scale. The 1st and 6th degree can be used interchangeably. Once again, this is all I know, I am no expert but it works for me. There are people here that will blow me away with theory, doesn't matter to me, I sound good.
#5
No such things as a best, just lots of good ones and several not so good ones. Now if you're serious about getting some recommendations, answer the questions in the sticky above for us.
#6
Quote by NewDayHappy
. Some people will fight me on this. 

You're right. IMO electric require a different skill set than acoustics (I have never really learned to play electric), so if that is what you want to play, that is what you should learn on.

There are lots of good cheap electric out there (my favourite cost less than $45) as noted, but it needs experience to find something suitable for your interests. Answer the sticky questions as suggested.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
You're right. IMO electric require a different skill set than acoustics (I have never really learned to play electric), so if that is what you want to play, that is what you should learn on.

There are lots of good cheap electric out there (my favourite cost less than $45) as noted, but it needs experience to find something suitable for your interests. Answer the sticky questions as suggested.

My only comeback is, look it dude, if it sounds good on an acoustic, it is going to sound killer on an electric.
#8
NewDayHappy 

Hmm, we have to agree to differ. I spent about 30 years playing acoustic before I took up electric, and I have never got the feel for electrics in the subsequent 25 years.  Also, I can't think of many players who are good at both, only Mark Knopfler and Ry Cooder come to mind.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
NewDayHappy

Hmm, we have to agree to differ. I spent about 30 years playing acoustic before I took up electric, and I have never got the feel for electrics in the subsequent 25 years.  Also, I can't think of many players who are good at both, only Mark Knopfler and Ry Cooder come to mind.

This post is absolute bullshit, sorry but we must disagree yet again. Eric Clapton ringe a bell? John Lennon?? Paul McCartney?? John Frusciante??? Bob Marley??? Elliott Smith??? Kurt Cobain???? 

Complete utter bullshit advice and I have to call you out on it. (Which I hate making call out posts.)
#11
I'd say a used Washburn would be a good start. 

But, price, pickup needs, personal preferences, etc. are all part of what needs clarified. 

Mitchell seems decent for the price too, but I'd like to wait and see how they do over time. They seem to have a competitive product in their respective price ranges.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#12
Quote by Tony Done
NewDayHappy

The ones I know on that list are not what I would call top-rank acoustic players.

hhahahahhaha,kkkk lol
#13
Quote by dthmtl3
No such things as a best, just lots of good ones and several not so good ones. Now if you're serious about getting some recommendations, answer the questions in the sticky above for us.
BUDGET: $100 is what I'm hoping for

LOCATION / CLOSEST CITY: Philippines

NEW or USED and ARE YOU WILLING TO ORDER ONLINE? Would love for it to be new but I'm not aversed to the idea of buying used. My only issue is I wouldn't be able to gauge if what I'm buying is a good guitar or if it has hidden issues I wouldn't be able to pinpoint.

SPECIFY WHAT YOU WANT
I only want to start playing with others for fun. I am mediocre at best. 0 knowledge about music theory, scales, power chords.

WHAT AMP DO YOU HAVE?
None.

WHAT OTHER GEAR DO YOU HAVE?
I have an acoustic guitar.
#14
NewDayHappy thanks for the video, I'll watch it. Your message makes no sense to me though since I have no knowledge about music theory. I hope to learn this too.
Last edited by traie at Apr 24, 2017,
#16
traie 

It was a Vietnamese (not Chinese!!) made Peavey Raptor Plus Exp from the local hock shop, price to clear at Oz$60. My daughter bought it for my birthday, after a few hints. It only needed a set up, everything else was good, but I have since changed the pickups. That was more compulsive modding than dissatisfaction with the originals.
#17
Quote by Tony Done
traie

It was a Vietnamese (not Chinese!!) made Peavey Raptor Plus Exp from the local hock shop, price to clear at Oz$60. My daughter bought it for my birthday, after a few hints. It only needed a set up, everything else was good, but I have since changed the pickups. That was more compulsive modding than dissatisfaction with the originals.

I can vouch for you here, I have heard really good things about the Raptor. Your daughter is immensely talented. I'd like to score one of them honestly. I need a guitar to practice on as far as repairs, pickups, intonation, that sort of shit.
#18
NewDayHappy 

I've also had a Chinese one which I didn't like as much as the Viet one. It was heavier, the Viet one only being 5 1/4 lb or thereabouts, the Chinese one was more typical strat weight, and the fretboard finish was rougher. Still a good guitar though, after some moddiing (switchable active tones, Lollar Chicago pickup etc) I sold it to a mate, and he really likes it.
#19
traie is it true that playing electric is easier than acoustic?


Yes, it is easer to play electric, I played acoustic for the first 8 years. Had to go electric to play punk rock in 1980.
#22
Get a Squier Bullet or an Affinity. You can get one with a bridge humbucker, they sell a little bit over $100 new and you'll find for less than $100 used as new (typically guitar teens get, quit learning and get rid of). It's good quality, versatile and with some mods later on you'll always find use for it.
'07 Jackson Pro Dinky DK2M (MIJ)
Squier Strat SE
Marshall Valvestate VS15R practice amp
#23
Quote by traie
Also is it true that playing electric is easier than acoustic?

1)  I would argue that electric is actually more difficult than acoustic, due to the fact that playing in tune is a challenge and controlling the various tones through an amp requires a larger range of techniques and precision.  Also, you basically have to become a sound engineer to get good tone.  Acoustic is much more forgiving, though harder on the fingers from a physical standpoint.

2) the best budget guitar is a Squier Strat - buy used. 
#24
Quote by reverb66
Acoustic is much more forgiving, though harder on the fingers from a physical standpoint.


Not necessarily if you get a Spanish-type nylon string acoustic guitar (or classical guitar as we call it around here). It's so comfortable to play, I could play it the entire day with no issue.

I don't think electric is always harder to play than acoustic, I began learning how to play on my electric and only almost an year after I bought an used acoustic guitar. Maybe for chords it'll be easier, but I find a lot of techniques such as hammer ons and pull offs, faster playing and mainly bends a lot easier on electric. It all depends what you want to play, but if one wants to learn electric specifically, holding it back to go first on acoustic might be less appealing to that person (and we all know that, reflects the effort put into practicing).
'07 Jackson Pro Dinky DK2M (MIJ)
Squier Strat SE
Marshall Valvestate VS15R practice amp
#25
The best entry guitar is the Yamaha Pacifica. I played 3 of them a few months ago, all in the 200€ range, and i was blown away. I was considering taking one just for the hell of it. Maybe it was an anomaly, but i never played any other cheap guitars that were as good, and especially not 3 in a row, they are usually more like hidden gems in a bad crowd. 
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#26
+1 for the Yamaha Pacifica if there is a used market in your area you may be able to score one for right around $100 give or take. FYI $100 is not much of a budget to work with even for something used, everyone should be as lucky asTony Doneto score a nice used player for $45!

It would help if yopu could try to save up maybe another $100 towards your budget and then you still will not have an amp to play through, do you also have a budget for or are you planning to purchase an amp as well?
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#27
What is the best, cheap, beginner electric guitar one could buy? 


Aint' no such thing. It's not a brand, not a model. 
It's whatever guitar you can afford coupled with a really good professional setup. If you leave the setup out of the equation, you have to rely on whatever the manufacturer left you, and that ain't necessarily good. I'd suggest budgeting $100 for a really good initial setup (and if it doesn't cost you that much, spend the rest (in good rock and roll fashion) on hookers and blow. Okay, maybe on a milkshake. 

I'm not sure why some posters have dragged the discussion off onto acoustic guitars, but there's no benefit in learning acoustic *before* electric if electric is your goal. It's like requiring you to learn baritone sax before being allowed to play clarinet. It makes no sense whatsoever. Silliness. 

There's no "consensus" on a beginner model electric; you want to buy the very best you can afford. "Cheap beginner" is a recipe for finding a guitar that will have you doing something else with your time. . If you're not ready for guitar financially, do something else. 
#28
i agree that a proper initial set up is worth the money on even the cheapest new electric, if you want it to play better than halfway decent.

playing acoustic can give you more finger strength, so be careful to lightly fret on an electric as it's easier to fret a note sharp on taller fret guitars. that's the first thing I'd say to an acoustic player learning to play an electric.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at Apr 24, 2017,
#29
Another vote for a professional setup when you buy the guitar - that in of itself is crucial on any guitar.  Guitars are not setup properly in stores at all - they're often a mess, so it's very important to have it setup properly. I'd much rather play a $300 well intonated and setup guitar than a $3000 guitar with a poor setup. 
#30
No such thing a "best", just what best suits your playing, which we have no clue.  Who are the guitarist influences you like?  What do they play?

Electric vs acoustic?  Again it just depends on what you want to play and where.  Without an amp or other DMFX device an electric is pretty boring so you will have to figure the whole kit into your budget.  Is an elect. easier to play?  Less finger strength required but a very different set of skills.  I play both and would not say one is "easier to learn" than the other.  Just different instruments for different musical paths.  Which path do you want to go down?
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#31
Cheapest usable electric (stays in tune most of the time sounds decent) guitar? Epiphone LP Special II bought used, usually ~60 to 70$'s

I bought one for the purpose of learning to intonate and adjust things like the truss rod, I feel like that's the same as changing the oil on your car.
Whether you do it yourself or not, you should know how to do it.

Currently I use it in open E tuning for slide.
Last edited by 33db at Apr 24, 2017,
#32
Squier 51. So good Fender made an expensive copy of a cheap guitar.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#33
Quote by NewDayHappy
Fender CD60. You don't want to plug into an amp unless you have headphones. Some people will fight me on this, once you become a bit more familiar with the guitar, I'd go with a cheap Fender or Yamaha acoustic. You don't want your mistakes being amplified bro. Plus, the acoustic will develop calluses and finger strength. It hurts like hell bro making power chords and bar chords on an acoustic just starting out. My finger tips used to rip open and I would super glue them shut so I could keep playing.



He is right from the standpoint that accoustic do take more strength and build finger durability better. I played mainly electric for years and I just got a new accoustic for something different and playing songs on the accoustic helps me play easier when I switch back to electric. It also helps to take the lead and rhythm parts and dissect them with a pure clean tones so you haer the note and not necessarily the distortion which helps build your music knowledge and ear. Also, modifying traditionally electric songs into accoustic can help you loads in exploring music. For instance Kingmaker by Megadeth sounds so much different on electric vs accoustic.


As for good cheap electrics I would say I am quite partial to LTD. It is ESPs cheaper line and you can get a get solid Les Paul style​ guitar around $400 usd that once you get better has enough quality for some nicer pickup like EMGs, Duncan's, or DiMarzio pups. I would avoid cheap Epiphones. I owned a cheap $350 one that was muddy as heck no matter what I did. Even new pups did not work. However, if you go to a $400 traditional pro II for example they are solid guitars especially once you upgrade the pups. Fender or Squire may also be worth looking into although I have never owned either Fenders play well.
#35
Quote by Mainer
My first quality, budget electric was an Epiphone Les Paul Special II. Still, eight or nine years later and it's the most reliable ax I own.

Yep, I was surprised at how good it sounded and once set up very playable.
#36
Quote by Mainer
My first quality, budget electric was an Epiphone Les Paul Special II. Still, eight or nine years later and it's the most reliable ax I own.


I'm pretty sure that says terrible things about your other guitars.  

Weighing in one more time on the "Should I start on an acoustic first?" argument...

While playing an acoustic guitar may build some finger strength, that's not necessarily a good thing. 

Too many guitar players making the switch (including those who've played their electric guitars acoustically since they're without an amp) take time to UNLEARN acoustic characteristics, such as strumming too hard, gorilla gripping the neck, etc.  The electric guitar depends more on the pickups to do the work (unless you're working with a lot of gain), and using the same amount of grip on chords on the acoustic will cause issues with strings being pulled sharp, wear on the frets and string noise (fingers sliding on strings).  

Higher action (usually action is higher on an acoustic than on an electric) will cause players to tend to lift their fingers too high, slowing their fretting hand down, and it will have some adverse effects on hammer-ons and pull-offs. There are also interesting characteristics that occur when bringing players over from ukelele and classical guitar. In fact, there are interesting things that happen when a piano player picks up a guitar for the first time. 
#38
Quote by Evilnine
+1 for the Yamaha Pacifica if there is a used market in your area you may be able to score one for right around $100 give or take. FYI $100 is not much of a budget to work with even for something used, everyone should be as lucky asTony Doneto score a nice used player for $45!

It would help if yopu could try to save up maybe another $100 towards your budget and then you still will not have an amp to play through, do you also have a budget for or are you planning to purchase an amp as well?
How much more expensive are amps? I was thinking of buying the guitar with an amp.
#40
Cajundaddy
Quote by Cajundaddy
No such thing a "best", just what best suits your playing, which we have no clue.  Who are the guitarist influences you like?  What do they play?

Electric vs acoustic?  Again it just depends on what you want to play and where.  Without an amp or other DMFX device an electric is pretty boring so you will have to figure the whole kit into your budget.  Is an elect. easier to play?  Less finger strength required but a very different set of skills.  I play both and would not say one is "easier to learn" than the other.  Just different instruments for different musical paths.  Which path do you want to go down?
I like the acoustic more because I can take an acoustic anywhere and still play complete songs on its own. I want an electric so I can play with other people.

For acoustic I'd love to play Nick Drake songs, that is personally the skill level I want to go for. For electric gonna play The Bends by Radiohead and The White Stripes.
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