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#1
Ok i have been playing for a little bit and thinking about one day playing live as part of a bucket list. Not sure how far i want or will be able to go, but hey you never know till you try. 

I am really into kiss and motley crue i thought about tribute band stuff, but not sure. 

One main thing I want to know is say i just do an 80s early 90s cover band that plays like 20 songs. About how many can you get away with or should you play from teh same group?

Also in a 10 or 20 song set how many ballads or power ballads can you get away with? If a song starts with a clean like say dream warriors by dokken i figure that is not a ballad or black diamond by kiss or even i want you by kiss

It seems that poison was playing like 12 songs at some showws the last few years and played 3 ballods. I was thinking maybe 5 for a 20 song set? 

I am just looking for insight. I know opinions will vary on it. 

I have also been told not to start or end a concert with a ballad. Is that pretty much the case? 
#2
I'd avoid doing too many songs by the same artist in a single set, unless you're doing several as a medley. I play in a professional wedding band and Michael Jackson has more songs in our sets than any other artist, and almost all of those are in a single medley. There might be a couple other MJ song in the other set.

As for ballads, I'd say one per set is plenty. The term Ballad is more about tempo and feel than anything else, no matter how wicked the guitar solos are. Plus ballads tend to be looooong, and in the classic rock genre, the audience gets tired of long songs very quickly. If you're going over like 3 minutes on a slow tune, you're going to lose the audience. Also, only use the ballad after you've had the floor packed for a while. No matter what, ballads send most people to their seats or the bar, so don't play one unless you've already got them hooked and you think it's time they go get another beer.

And succinctness is key, whether it's a ballad or a rocker. It's totally normal to cut out verses/choruses and just play meatiest 3 minutes of the song. There might be a dozen grooves in all of classic rock that you can get away with jamming on for more than 5 minutes, and I'm pretty sure they're all Stevie Wonder songs.

Remember that what the actual band does is not the same as what a cover band can get away with. People pay like $150 to see their favorite bands, and they're going to sit through every minute of the show and love it. When you're playing in bar, you kinda have to accept that you don't have actual fans and nobody is paying to hear you, so you really have to put effort into meeting them halfway. You're accommodating people who may not be fans of every song you play.

My best advice is to go see some of the popular cover bands in your area do and learn from them. Even get their card and reach out to them later. You'll likely find that they keep the songs relatively short, move quickly from song to song, use instrumental solos sparingly, keep their stage volume under control, and use their slow songs strategically.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 26, 2017,
#3
If you're a cover band you shouldn't compare yourself to original bands like Poison. Your job, as a cover band, is to get people dancing, staying in the venue and drinking. Slow songs have little place in doing this.

To answer your basic question, standard covers gig is 3-4 hours. In reality a 4 hour gig is more like 1x1 hour, 3x45min sets (3 X 15min breaks).

1 hour is about 16 songs.
45 mins is about 12 songs.

So if you'd like work as a cover band I'd get 16 + 12 + 12 + 12 songs down then start gigging. So minimum 52 songs. The cover bands in my area that work the most have a repertoire of about 80 songs.
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#4
To make sure i get what ballads are are these ballads

Whitesnake here i go again
whitesnake now your gone
white lion wait ( i am leaning that it is but not sure)
#5
"Here I go Again" isn't a ballad. That's a pretty solid fist pumping rock tune.

"Now You're Gone" is borderline rock song.

The White Lion tune starts out like a ballad, but the rest of song is pretty straight ahead rock.

Stuff like "Sister Christian", "Every Rose Has its Thorn", "November Rain", "Open Arms", "I want to Know What Love Is" ... are typical and very popular ballads. Any of those would have a rock-friendly crowd singing along.

The feel is pretty important to whether a song is a ballad. Compare the drums in "Open Arms" to "Wait"). The Journey song's drums have a very slow pace, while the other is much more upbeat and busy sounding. Counted as 6/8, "Open Arms" is like 35bpm. The same goes for the other instruments, as well. In "Open Arms", the guitar comes in and does almost nothing but whole notes, while "Wait" is driven a melodic riffs in the bass and guitar. 
Last edited by cdgraves at May 3, 2017,
#6
Other ballads:

Extreme: "More Than Words"
Kiss: "Beth"
White Lion: "When the children cry"
Lisa Ford: "Close My Eyes Forever" (borderline)
Motley Crüe: "Home Sweet Home"
Dokken: "Alone Again" (borderline)
Slaughter: "Fly to the Angels"
Queensrÿche: "Silent Lucidity"
Ozzy Osbourne: "Mama, I'm coming Home"
Tesla: "Love Song" (borderline)
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#7
Quote by cdgraves
My best advice is to go see some of the popular cover bands in your area do and learn from them.

This is the best bit of advice here.

From what you say, you're still only really learning so you're a long way off actually getting out there and playing live.  Just go watch as many local bands as you can, see what they do & make mental notes about the types of songs they play and how they structure their set.

A couple of things that have been said I'm going to disagree with though:
  1. Shortening songs.  NO.  If you're playing a song people know, they want to hear it.  You'll get complaints that you cut something short, but I've never known an audience complain that you did a whole song, even if it was one they don't personally like.  People will remember that you half-assed the song they liked more than they remember everything else.

  2. Gig length.  The estimates above seem a bit long to me, but it probably does vary country to country.  In the UK a typical pub gig is 2 sets, the first about 45 minutes, the second about an hour, with maybe a 15 minute encore.  Expect to play between 30 & 40 songs depending on length.

The key thing for now though is to keep learning and use this as a long term goal to aim at.
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#8
Well you wouldn't just cut any song down. The idea is to cut down songs that actually do get tiresome so that you have time for the crowd favorites. There a lot of songs that feature pretty much the same groove all the way through, and which are really cool for like the first two minutes, but then start to pall. "September", "Groove Tonight", "Wanna Be Starting Something", "We Want the Funk", "Sex Machine"... Those kinds of tunes are great for medleys because you get like 4 strong songs without each one losing its dance power halfway through.

Granted those songs don't like what this particular band is going for, but it's totally normal to trim some fat from the longwinded songs.
#9
Medleys are a different case, definitely.  My band does Anniversary Waltz by Status Quo, 10 minutes of old rock n roll classics which always goes down well.
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#10
I agree with the 4 sets for 45 minutes with 15 minutes break. I live in New Jersey (USA) and for my 40 years playing clubs across many parts of the US it has always been that format. Four hours. As for ballads make them the big really popular everyone-knows-them-by-heart songs the kind they can sing along too at least mentally. Do all your friends, your Aunt and Uncle your neighbor down the street know any Dokken, Slaughter or Queensryce songs?? I doubt it. Then they are not universally popular and won't work. In a cover band you have to play very familiar songs which usually are not your favorite songs but it's the songs people want to hear. Listen to cdgraves. I agree with everything he said. 

There are many types of bands. The bands I'm most familiar with are cover bands that play very popular higher energy material that is very familiar to a club or bar type audience.  That's been most of my playing over years. Tribute bands imitate a particular artist in both sound and look down to every note but I would be bored imitating someone note for note playing the same songs over and over. Original bands are great but most only do their own material and are aware of and accept the limited access to regular weekly gigs but I want to play often. In a cover band it's more about the week to week playing, the constant experience of playing live and the money that a good cover band can generate. I play in cover bands because I like to play as often as possible to an audience. I'm not a "jam" type musician and I don't like to rehearse without the motivation of regular gigs.  While I would enjoy being in an originals or tribute band it would limit my ability to play as often as I do. It's just personal choices.

By the way, if you are considering a tribute band, check out the competition. Last year I saw a few excellent ones like Musical Box (early Genesis), Eaglemania (Eagles), Live Wire (AC/DC) and the best tribute band I have ever seen Almost Queen (Queen). These tribute bands are the top of the heap. 
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 4, 2017,
#11
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Other ballads:

Extreme: "More Than Words"
Kiss: "Beth"
White Lion: "When the children cry"
Lisa Ford: "Close My Eyes Forever" (borderline)
Motley Crüe: "Home Sweet Home"
Dokken: "Alone Again" (borderline)
Slaughter: "Fly to the Angels"
Queensrÿche: "Silent Lucidity"
Ozzy Osbourne: "Mama, I'm coming Home"
Tesla: "Love Song" (borderline)


I would argue that Mama, I'm Coming Home and Home, Sweet Home are more borderline since they are obviously ballady, but get more rocking once you get to the choruses. Especially compared to More Than Words, Silent Lucidity, and When the Children Cry from that list as well as others like Every Rose has its Thorns and Is this Love? and To be with You and the like that never really get to really rocking.

Still, too many relatively slow songs is no good in general, ballads or not and regardless of how hard they might rock after they intro.
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#12
theogonia777

I agree with your conclusion 100%. I just saw a band on Tuesday that has several excellent slower songs in their catalog. They performed one. it wastnt the one I'd have chosen, but it still kicked ass.

Then the band returned to the previously scheduled tearing the roof off the place.
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#13
Quote by theogonia777
I would argue that Mama, I'm Coming Home and Home, Sweet Home are more borderline since they are obviously ballady, but get more rocking once you get to the choruses.

They're all ballads, the ones that get heavier are just power ballads. The tempo of the song and (usually) lyrical subject matter are more indicative of whether they're ballads than whether they 'rock'.
#14
I might quibble on the set times. It varies depending on the region and what kind of place it is. If it's a bar with a built in crowd, you're pretty safe taking breaks because the house music comes back on, and customers are coming and going constantly. But if your band is tasked with keeping the audience, it's probably best to do a couple of 75-90 minute sets. Don't give people a chance to stop moving and realize how drunk they are.

Fuck, last weekend I did a wedding and we played for nearly 3 hours straight. Some of that was due to the wedding getting behind its own schedule, but we were only contracted for like 2:15 of music, so we did about 30 minutes of "first dance" songs and then stayed on stage for one really long set. But when you're dedicated to entertaining, that's how it is sometimes, and when there's momentum you just gotta roll with it.
Quote by dannyalcatraz
theogonia777

I agree with your conclusion 100%.  I just saw a band on Tuesday that has several excellent slower songs in their catalog.  They performed one.  it wastnt the one I'd have chosen, but it still kicked ass.
 

Yeah, they're tough to work in. Looking at my set list for this wedding season, there's not a single slow song on it. All high energy. Slow songs are for the daddy/daughter dance stuff. The closest we get is "Stand by Me", and that's only if there's some slack in the set time.
#15
GaryBillington We probably play different parts of the covers scene dude.

The 2 hour set is usually background music in seated areas. They're usually earlier (6-8pm/Sunday Arvo sesh) and it doesn't​ really matter what you play.

3-4 hour sets are for band who maintain the dancefloor. They'll usually play 9pm-12pm, although 10pm-2am is not uncommon, a typical Saturday night graveyard slot.
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#16
AlanHB We play anywhere that will pay us! South West UK, between Bristol & Swindon. We're never just background music, most of the bars we play have dancing areas. Places tend to be licenced for music till midnight, start about 9.15-9.30ish and go through till a little before midnight with a 15-20 minute break.

That's fairly standard for bars in most of the UK that I've been to (never played the big cities though), obviously there are clubs & venues that go a bit later but they tend not to have local covers bands, they're usually bigger names & tribute acts.
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#17
GaryBillington So you  play for 3 hours? I was addressing your point above where you said most bands play 2.
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#18
Not the full 3 hours.
Start 915-930 ish
15-20 minute break.
Finish a little before midnight.
At most thats 2.5 hours, and that's only if you start bang on time & take the minimum break.
Sure, the gig would probably be classes as a 3 hour slot, but you don't play anywhere near the full time. Actual playing time is closer to 2 hours.
That's been the case everywhere I've played and everywhere else I've been to a regular local pub gig.
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#19
GaryBillington Sure - looks like our figures are pretty close to each other, just that my bands start on time lol

For weddings it's usually the opposite though - get booked for 4 hours, time gets eaten up by speeches, play maybe 90 mins at the end (first dance to leaving of bride/groom) and maybe another 45 during dinner, although they're usually quite happy with Spotify covering the dinner set.
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#20
AlanHB I'm too rock n roll to start on time!
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#21
Quote by AlanHB
GaryBillington Sure - looks like our figures are pretty close to each other, just that my bands start on time lol

For weddings it's usually the opposite though - get booked for 4 hours, time gets eaten up by speeches, play maybe 90 mins at the end (first dance to leaving of bride/groom) and maybe another 45 during dinner, although they're usually quite happy with Spotify covering the dinner set.

I've played close to 30 weddings in the last year and only a handful actually got us on stage at the contracted time. We contract start and stop times (helps with noise ordinance/venue compliance), so if the client can't keep their wedding on schedule it's their loss. Not that they mind. What region do you play in, if you don't mind me asking?
#22
cdgraves I live in Canberra, Australia. We have a pretty awesome local music scene.

Yeah I don't mind about the weddings either. Usually a big draw of the band is that they can provide microphones for speeches and canned music from Spotify as well as the band itself.

As for the actual timing, I think most people just get excited/paranoid about the wedding and go overboard. Doesn't really matter either way as you have to set up before the wedding starts and set down after - you'll be there for the same amount of time irrespective of how long you play.
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Last edited by AlanHB at May 5, 2017,
#23
AlanHB oh nice. I'm out of Denver, CO USA. Solid original scene and tons of big acts coming through all the time. Great place to play weddings, too, with rich couples booking the mountain resort towns.

Edit: yes that's my experience, as well. Last weekend our set got cut down by nearly an hour because a late season snow storm forced the ceremony indoors. Our stop times are usually a hard cutoff to avoid any trouble with venues. Bars, however, will go right up til about 2am.
Last edited by cdgraves at May 5, 2017,
#24
cdgraves Cool - I went to Denver years ago for a snowboarding trip. Ended up giving a presentation to a primary school class about Australia.

One of the really interesting thing about this forum, and the Bandleading forum in particular, is that the issues that face bands appear to be universal and not affected by your physical location at all. I guess that part of the whole "everyone is human" thing.
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#25
Thanks guys. Good stuff. 

On cutting parts from songs or "modifying them" a couple friends who play locally have told me that one of the only things really that wont get the crowd bringing out pitchforks and torches are the solo. Example cutting a couple notes, but dont get crazy reducing it will not be noticed by many except other guitar players. Not saying its a good idea., but seems like one thing you can do. Most of the guitarist is talk to says there are song parts to some songs they modify
#26
Here in the skirts of LA we are a cover band that plays mostly special events with a few bars and juke joints sprinkled in here and there.  We have been doing this for quite a while and have a total of about 200 songs in our catalog with 60 well rehearsed and ready to go any time.  For most gigs we need a 50 song set, 120bpm is the magic number for a dance crowd, and we always have a few slow ballads for requests or those who want to slow dance.  We just played a Sr Prom last weekend with a 60s music theme.  Jerry Lee Louis and Little Richard tunes were the big hits of the night.

-Know your audience
-Keep them moving
-Have fun with them
-It's not about you
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#27
I like Cajundaddy's response especially "It's not about you". That's the core premise a good cover band needs to understand. I might add to that line "It's not about you or your circle of friends". Just because you, your bandmates and a few friends like (fill in the band name) does not mean a room full of people at the local club/bar whatever place you are playing will. My band partner and I have been together for 21 years now (unbelievable) so in that time we have amassed a large set of songs to choose from. It's not that we can play every song on the list at any time but we can go into the list every few weeks and rehearse about 10 older songs that we use to do to spice up our current sets. I also agree about the timing on wedding gigs. We are contracted to do four hours of entertainment but you never know when you'll get started, when speeches will be made or any other distractions. The good thing is that the catering hall or wherever you are playing will let you know when it's over because they booked the wedding for a specific time and they are usually turning over the room for the next private affair before you get your equipment out the door.

I like this thread. Sharing thoughts and experiences about playing live gigs from all over the world is very interesting. 
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 9, 2017,
#28
Quote by Rickholly74
I like Cajundaddy's response especially "It's not about you". That's the core premise a good cover band needs to understand. I might add to that line "It's not about you or your circle of friends".

This is very true.  There are some songs in my bands set that I hate, but I'd be reluctant to drop them because they always go down well.
Quote by Rickholly74
I like this thread. Sharing thoughts and experiences about playing live gigs from all over the world is very interesting. 

I've found it interesting.  Obviously most of the replies relating to gig length etc have been US based guys, who have a very different experience to what I've experienced here in the UK.

As for the discussion of what is/isn't a ballad, I may or may not agree with some of the songs discussed but going back to the "It's not about you" thing I suspect most of them would have a limited audience based on my personal experience.  When I started playing in bands in the early 90s, most covers bands stuck primarily to 70s rock.  25 years later, most covers bands still predominantly play 70s rock.  My band gets as far back as the 50s and as recent as about 2005, but those 70s tracks are still the backbone of our set and the most popular through all generations of audience.
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#29
I agree that the "classic rock" 70's stuff for whatever reason just continues to work. You can just mix it in the sets and it usually gets a positive reaction. For me it has the added benefit of being stuff I already played years ago but now being a much more experienced and better player get to relearn them and play the right way.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 10, 2017,
#30
Quote by Rickholly74
I agree that the "classic rock" 70's stuff for whatever reason just continues to work.

It all goes back to the MTV effect.  In the 70s, the music was the important thing.  "Pop Music" just meant anything that was popular.  

Once MTV became the big thing, video truly killed the radio star.  Image became more important and Pop Music became a genre in it's own right.  Rock became more of an alternative choice rather than the mainstream.  Those 70s artists keep coming back because they were the last generation of rock music to get the same airtime as all the other genres of music.  Because of that they became classics, and still get that good level of airtime.

80s rock bands onwards (with a few notable exceptions) never really got that same mainstream airtime, so never became classics except to those who were into it at the time.  As a result, the current airtime is minimal and the younger generations (does that make me old?!!) don't get to hear it so much and those who are strictly mainstream pop fans have probably never heard of most of it.

Generalising a bit perhaps, but I think the overall concept is the truth.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at May 10, 2017,
#31
Very good analogy. I agree though I never looked at it that way. Most 70's bands that got lots of radio airtime did not translate to the MTV crowd. MTV as a new media helped create a whole new generation of artists that were good at not only making music but had to be good at making videos. Look and style became as important  (sometimes more so) than the actual music. That's a very good point. In the 70's you only got to know what a band looked like from their album covers or at a concert. While the mid 60's band's got quit a bit of TV exposure because it was a new phenomenon by the 70's that wasn't happening with bands. By then networks were more interested in "Donny and Marie" and Sonny and Cher". The popular album oriented bands were rarely seen on prime time TV. 
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 10, 2017,
#32
the "golden age" of Rock was really pretty short. If we call Led Zeppelin I the birth of "classic rock", and Disco the death of it, that's like 5 or 6 years. But I'd say classic rock bands were going strong into the 80s, despite MTV.

More than just a paradigm shift in the entertainment industry, I think a lot of the bands that were big in the early 70s were fading out on their own by the time MTV came around. Pink Floyd might be one the longest hangers on, putting out The Wall in like 1978. The disco influence is pretty clear. Jon Bonham had died. Eagles had split. Jefferson Airplane became Jefferson Starship (though "Jane" is a great song).

At the same time, though, there was a bunch of good rock in the 80s that didn't really result in remarkable music videos. Are there any memorable Bryan Adams videos from the 80s? Foreigner? Toto? AC/DC? Bon Jovi? John Mellencamp?

I think MTV came along at the same time that music was become pop oriented, but I don't think it was responsible for the change in popular music styles during the time. The huge early dance/pop artists hit in the late 70s: Michael Jackson, Donna Summer, Rick James, Chic, etc. Pop was big for several years before MTV.

On the other side, I would argue that good videos helped bring a lot of good music to the fore that might not have gotten national exposure otherwise. Think of an act like Green Day who had a couple of cool music videos that helped drive the popularity of their breakout album Dookie. 
#33
Disco didn't kill anything, there were lots of hard rock and metal bands that did well after and outlasted it.
Quote by cdgraves
AC/DC? Bon Jovi?

Bon Jovi were one of the bands that benefited hugely from MTV. Livin' on a Prayer, You Give Love a Bad Name, Wanted Dead or Alive, yes those videos were just slightly popular.
AC/DC, yeah not such an MTV band, Thunderstruck would be their biggest video, just into the 90s.
#34
That and the "Maximum Overdrive" movie video for "Who Made Who?"
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#35
Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying there aren't a lot of exceptions to the theory I posted earlier, the 80s rock bands like Bon Jovi etc benefited from video channels as well which they may not have if it wasn't for MTV.  Bon Jovi is a good example of an exception to the rule of pop killing the rock scene, as they started out pre-MTV but only made it huge in '87 when Livin On A Prayer got major airtime (from a UK perspective at least, can't speak for the US).  They're also the main example of an exception of the next change which happened in the early 90s when Grunge all-but killed off the 80s metal scene seemingly overnight.  Those 80s band though were a big part of the shift towards MTV friendly artists, where their image was just as important as their music.  Kiss are a good example of the opposite being true, where a band's image was a major marketing factor before it became the focus throughout the industry so they could be considered an exception to the rule or one of the bands that started the ball rolling in that direction.

Despite those exceptions, for me the theory stands.  It may have started earlier and the industry is obviously constantly evolving as markets change, but I truly believe that MTV factor (for the want of putting a title to it) is a key reason the 70s rock artists still hold on to that level of universal popularity to this day.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at May 11, 2017,
#36
Quote by GaryBillington
This is the best bit of advice here.

From what you say, you're still only really learning so you're a long way off actually getting out there and playing live.  Just go watch as many local bands as you can, see what they do & make mental notes about the types of songs they play and how they structure their set.

A couple of things that have been said I'm going to disagree with though:
  1. Shortening songs.  NO.  If you're playing a song people know, they want to hear it.  You'll get complaints that you cut something short, but I've never known an audience complain that you did a whole song, even if it was one they don't personally like.  People will remember that you half-assed the song they liked more than they remember everything else.

  2. Gig length.  The estimates above seem a bit long to me, but it probably does vary country to country.  In the UK a typical pub gig is 2 sets, the first about 45 minutes, the second about an hour, with maybe a 15 minute encore.  Expect to play between 30 & 40 songs depending on length.

The key thing for now though is to keep learning and use this as a long term goal to aim at.

Second.

I have played with so many original and cover bands.  Based on everything I have seen:

Odds are, you aren't going to get an entire night's set dedicated to you with a brand new band that has no recognition (even a cover band).  You will be lucky to get 30 to an hour, to start.  Probably going to share the bill with some other acts.  Although, you should have more than that ready.

It sounds like you're really interested in just a couple of specific bands.  A tribute band may be the way to go, for you.  Pick one specific band (or two) and just learn all of their stuff.  It's up to you if you want to try and dress like them.  Unless you pull it off 100%, it's usually best just to go up there as a tight unit and not worry about looking like the original band, just sounding like them - but there are exceptions.

Anyways, this isn't meant to discourage you.  I can tell that you do need more experience gigging, though, based on a lot of your questions.  That is perfectly OK.  It's never too late to get your feet wet.

BUT if you take nothing else away from my comment, take this to heart:

-Don't bite off more than you can chew.  You probably aren't ready for a 3 hour set.
-Don't expect to completely kill it your first time.  Mistakes happen.  Enjoy it and learn from them.
-Learn from the bands that you play with.  See what they do.  Notice how the audience reacts and/or doesn't react to them.

Happy Gigging!
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#37
^^^ If your cover band isn't ready for a 3 hour gig, you aren't ready for a gig.

We explored this above, but the 2 hour set is generally limited to acoustic duos and the like - background music. If you're there to make the dance floor, 3 hour minimum.

Also the ideas about a 30 min gig for a cover band and the concept of a cover band doing an encore are ridiculous.
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#38
^ I'm in a covers band & we get encores at every gig.
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#39
Quote by AlanHB


Also the ideas about a 30 min gig for a cover band and the concept of a cover band doing an encore are ridiculous.

Quote by GaryBillington
^ I'm in a covers band & we get encores at every gig.

1) My band does encore-ish songs. We'll announce last song, say good night, and then play one more if they're chanting for it and the venue manager gives us a thumbs up. But we don't leave the stage and come back. We only leave the stage for our actual break.

2) If you're doing an encore every gig, you should plan for your set to be that length. That or put a encore clause in your contract so you can get some extra pay for that extra stage time. 

Most bars have the band play up until last call, which is 1:45am here. If a cover band does an encore it's because they stopped early or ran out of material. Some places might have them stop earlier for their own reasons, but I don't see much bar music ending before last call.

And different places have different music cultures. I wouldn't be surprised if a cover band in New England planned for encore (or rather hoped to end their set early but had to come back on stage). But the scene here is a bit tighter and the good cover bands just pack their set. 

As for playing 30 minute slot gigs... that's really not the scene a cover band should be working. Unless you're doing it solely for stage experience, or it's a show/venue dedicated to the style you're covering, there's absolutely no reason to deal with slot gig BS. I agree that 3 hours of music is the minimum amount of music you should have ready.
Last edited by cdgraves at May 12, 2017,
#40
cdgravesYeah exactly dude.

Past the fact that you'll get an encore by default from the drunks shouting "one more song" forever, the band is engaged to play a certain amount of time, usually until last drinks or 10 mins after bar closes.

After the bar stops selling drinks, they stop making money and it's in their interests to kick everyone out and close up asap (to limit the pay to their staff). If there is band playing encores, keeping people in and the party going after this time, the band becomes a liability and management would likely step in to stop them (and never book them again).

If you planned an encore into your set for some reason, you're introducing what I refer to as "dead time" to your set. In cover band it is almost mandatory to have almost zero time between songs because people will leave the dance floor if they are confronted with 10 seconds of no music. Dead time kills the dance floor. Why you would actively do it in your set in the hopes that the crowd will chant for you to play more is beyond me.

This is completely different from original bands. People come to see original bands to listen to the music. If they're completely engaged, they ask you to play longer.

In a cover band people don't come to see you, they dance with each other, they aren't "engaged" with the band. You just play music.

It becomes very apparent when you look at crowds at both original and cover bands. For originals they form lines, all facing the band. For cover gigs they form circles, facing eachother.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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Last edited by AlanHB at May 13, 2017,
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