#1
So the distortion pedal I bought the other days has a semi-parametric 3-band EQ. Meaning, I got bass and treble, and a mid control with frequency sweep. I have no idea which frequencies the mid control affects, though, since it is only labelled "mid freq". I've got a pretty nice tone going on, but I'd like to get some more variety out of the little box, but it's pretty easy to mud up the sound, so I thought I'd ask for help.

I heard that some metal bands cut their mids for a supposedly heavier tone, but I've also heard that's BS when on stage because it messes with being heard. I cut the bass a bit, so the Drop C guitar won't interfere with the bass, and boosted treble a bit, but other than that, I have no idea what might sound good or not. I'll keep toying around with the knobs, but I'd be grateful for some tips which to boost or to cut for some nice tones.
#2
Hard to say without knowing the equipment in question. Some amps/pedals are very mid heavy, some are naturally scooped. What gear are we talking?

Generally speaking, I like plenty of upper mids so that I can cut through with lead lines. A lot of modern metal guys like more lower mids. The best way to find out is just to keep tweaking. Use your ears, not your eyes when you are dialing in.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#3
The pedal is a Rocktron Reaction Distortion I.

Having more mids during leads would be like using the neck pickup for leads and bridge for rhythm? I've been told in another thread lots of people like using the neck for solos and the likes.
#4
Again, not necessarily. It really depends on the pickups, though honestly the pickups are going to have nearly the affect on your general EQ that your amp and pedals will.

So looking at your pedal, it looks a bit like the Metal Zone by Boss. I'd hazard a guess it probably is at least similar in sound, which means that it can be quite finicky to dial in. What are you plugging into?
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#6
Okay, gotcha. Are you playing into a guitar cab at all?

EDIT: What I mean to say is there a guitar speaker in the cab or a full-range type?
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
Last edited by dementiacaptain at Apr 26, 2017,
#7
Quote by HashtagMC
I run it into the simplest of amps - a wooden box with a solid state amp circuit and a speaker. No knobs, no nothing.
I'd say get a proper tube amp before doing anything else.
#8
Quote by dementiacaptain
Okay, gotcha.  Are you playing into a guitar cab at all?

EDIT:  What I mean to say is there a guitar speaker in the cab or a full-range type?

Celestion guitar speaker.
#9
Quote by Will Lane
I'd say get a proper tube amp before doing anything else.

You've got to be kidding - I'd have to save up about two years to get a 10W tube combo ^^ Not gonna happen with a highschooler's budget. The "box" combo amp does the amplification and speaker simulation, that's what I want it to do. Less is more and all that stuff is literally all I can afford.
#10
Alright, so at least it is a guitar speaker. Well, I'm sure you know this, but your setup isn't exactly ideal. What sort of sounds in particular are you going for? I would imagine rock/metal, but any bands in particular?
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#11
I know, far from ideal, but with a budget of 15 quid or so a month, there's not so much room for anything ^^ Plus, I recently borrowed some to get tickets to a festival as long as there still were tickets.

Sound... Green Day, Metallica, Bullet for my Valentine & My Chemical Romance. The pedal's definitely not primarily cut out for rock, but I think a -bit-harder-than-rock sound should be doable.

For Green Day I think turning down the gain is one thing to do, but I don't know about EQ. I've heard on older albums, Metallica used to scoop their mids, but other than that, I have no idea.

P.S: I guess with some saving up I could afford a solid state practice amp, but I'd rather skip the "practice amp" stage, wait a bit longer, and get right to the interesting stuff. I'm planning on saving up for a 150W bass combo the entire next year. Because I mainly play bass now, and running a guitar through a bass amp sounds good to me (I tried it).
Last edited by HashtagMC at Apr 26, 2017,
#13
I was going to tell you, mids are your friend in your case. I would definitely limit bass and treble, focus on midrange (this is where the guitar lives naturally).
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#14
Playing around with the mids, I actually got something that is at least resemblant of an upturned overdrive. Pretty good for 90's Green Day or similar sounds. Mids a bit down and gain a bit up got a nice Black Album vibe going on, and leaving mids alone, bass down, treble up and gain up is pretty nice for metalcore.

Now I just gotta learn how to scream. So far, I've only managed some growling, and I run out of air pretty quick, but that's for another thread.

Back to EQ, does it make sense to cut the bass to leave room for the actual bass, or would I rather do that in post (or not at all)? And what about playing live, am I right in assuming that mixing for a live gig is something else entirely than EQing in a homestudio?
#15
You are right in the sense that EQing for live applications is different than what you would do at home generally. As far as cutting out room for bass, this is a good idea generally speaking, but may not even be an issue depending on your gear. For instance, my bass player is plenty powerful enough, and my amp doesn't even come close to approaching his frequency range.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#16
Well, I play lots of songs in Drop D or C or even Drop fucking B (intonation problems, I hate you), so I'd assume there's lots of bass frequencies that could interfere with the bass.
#18
Quote by HashtagMC
Well, I play lots of songs in Drop D or C or even Drop fucking B (intonation problems, I hate you), so I'd assume there's lots of bass frequencies that could interfere with the bass.


Eh maybe but unless your amp has a LOT of power its likely not producing the not producing the fundamentals of those low notes at high volumes.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#19
Quote by HashtagMC
I know, far from ideal, but with a budget of 15 quid or so a month, there's not so much room for anything ^^ Plus, I recently borrowed some to get tickets to a festival as long as there still were tickets.

Sound... Green Day, Metallica, Bullet for my Valentine & My Chemical Romance. The pedal's definitely not primarily cut out for rock, but I think a -bit-harder-than-rock sound should be doable.

For Green Day I think turning down the gain is one thing to do, but I don't know about EQ. I've heard on older albums, Metallica used to scoop their mids, but other than that, I have no idea.

P.S: I guess with some saving up I could afford a solid state practice amp, but I'd rather skip the "practice amp" stage, wait a bit longer, and get right to the interesting stuff. I'm planning on saving up for a 150W bass combo the entire next year. Because I mainly play bass now, and running a guitar through a bass amp sounds good to me (I tried it).

I use MXR DD11 Dime Distortion. I use it for practice at a remote location where I can dump a cheap SS combo or for short gigs where I would be most likely to find a bad SS amp. The DD11 makes the amp sound decent. But with your budget it is quite expensive. I would not recommend this setup as a main setup though. If you can save up some money, look at a Fender Bassman. Sounds amazing with both bass and electric guitar. It is quite expensive but worth every penny.