#1
Hey guys, having some trouble working out how to deal with this. I'll do it in timeline form to keep it brief. 

1. I join a band whose singer just quit, they hire a temporary singer who's not really into it but helps us out just to get us going. 
2. We play a couple of shows, they're ok. Singer then quits. 
3. We find a permanent singer who's infinitely better than the temp. Our musicianship and general quality skyrockets. We play more shows, get loads of good feedback, make serious progress with our marketing etc
4. Our singer gets us a "real" gig, fully paid, two hour show, 1000 capacity etc
5. The guitarist (originally the bandleader but it's become more of a democracy in the last year or so) gets us a charity show at his school. But it's on the same day as the paid gig, only three hours before, and 30 miles away. 
6. We do want to make it work but our singer is a powerhouse and we don't want to kill her vocal cords for the sake of a charity gig at a school when we have a real paid show the same night. 
7. Guitarist suggests bringing the temp back in for the charity show. 

Now, I really don't like this. The temp singer is kind of shit tbh and I'm not happy putting our name to an inferior version of ourselves, and without the singer we're not even the same band. Permanent singer is also not happy about it because she feels pushed out, which I can totally understand. But guitarist doesn't seem to see the problem. 

What would you do?
Quote by Andron17
Go away, I have an erection.


Bassist for Half My Kingdom.
Last edited by TJ1991 at Apr 26, 2017,
#2
Hi dude, I'll just break up and address the issues I see:

Guitarist booked a gig without clearing it with the rest of the band

This is a pretty common issue with those new to bands. One member gets excited with the offer of a gig, and they book it without asking the other guys. Firstly I'd like to point out that it's really great that the guitarist wants to help with booking shows, and you don't want to discourage this.

In the future, when a member of the band gets offered a gig, make sure that every member of the band is available/cool with doing the gig prior to you booking it. This could take a bit of training to ensure that everyone responds quickly, but they'll learn.

But in this case, the band has taken the gig, and cancelling shows is generally a big no-no, as you will likely not be asked by that group of people to play a show for them again. That said, if you're going to be crap and know it, cancel the gig and try to organise a replacement.

The singer wants to save their vocal chords

I think this is fair, and could have been avoided if they were asked about the gig prior to the guitarist locking it in.

In this case I'd talk to the singer and ask if they could not push themselves during the charity gig, treat it like a warmup for the later gig.

Can we use the temp?

I'd be concerned with using them too. If you're going to play badly, it won't look great, and any benefit gained from playing the charity gig will not be worth it.

Charity gig vs "real" gig 

I noticed phrases like this "we don't want to kill her vocal cords for the sake of a charity gig at a school when we have a real paid show the same night". Although I understand that some gigs may seem "bigger" than others, I'd stray away from actively ignoring a gig just because it's a "charity gig at a school". You don't really know who will be there, school gigs can be pretty crazy. It could be better than the other gig - you won't know until you play it.

Timing

Generally speaking the band should be at a venue at least an hour before they begin to play. 

From your post the charity gig is:

- same day as the paid gig
- only three hours before
- 30 miles away 

When does the charity gig end? You may not be able to do it anyway.

If it starts at 3pm, and you play 2 hours (same as the paying gig) until 5pm, and then you have a gig at 6pm (with a 30 mile drive, which will be around 30 minutes), you'll be late to the paying gig (factoring loadout of charity gig, and loadin to paying gig).

Actual plan from the above

1. Figure out if you can actually make it to the paying gig one hour before it starts. If not, cancel the charity gig.
2. If you can, ask singer if they can hold back during the charity gig for a one hour set. Or do a chilled dinnertime set, no need for loud rock music at 3pm in the afternoon.
3. If the singer cannot, cancel the charity and try to find a replacement band for yourself.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
Last edited by AlanHB at Apr 27, 2017,
#3
The conventional approach is to do the first gig you are booked for, even if the second gig is 'better'. Quite apart from the moral issues you really don't want to get a reputation for letting people down. You need to have a way of checking everyone's availability too in future. Get a band diary.

Try not to fall out over it though, just say you are really sorry you can't do the School gig, maybe offer to do it on a different day. I'm assuming the paying gig was booked first?
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Hi dude, I'll just break up and address the issues I see:

Guitarist booked a gig without clearing it with the rest of the band

This is a pretty common issue with those new to bands. One member gets excited with the offer of a gig, and they book it without asking the other guys. Firstly I'd like to point out that it's really great that the guitarist wants to help with booking shows, and you don't want to discourage this.

In the future, when a member of the band gets offered a gig, make sure that every member of the band is available/cool with doing the gig prior to you booking it. This could take a bit of training to ensure that everyone responds quickly, but they'll learn.

But in this case, the band has taken the gig, and cancelling shows is generally a big no-no, as you will likely not be asked by that group of people to play a show for them again. That said, if you're going to be crap and know it, cancel the gig and try to organise a replacement.

The singer wants to save their vocal chords

I think this is fair, and could have been avoided if they were asked about the gig prior to the guitarist locking it in.

In this case I'd talk to the singer and ask if they could not push themselves during the charity gig, treat it like a warmup for the later gig.

Can we use the temp?

I'd be concerned with using them too. If you're going to play badly, it won't look great, and any benefit gained from playing the charity gig will not be worth it.

Charity gig vs "real" gig 

I noticed phrases like this "we don't want to kill her vocal cords for the sake of a charity gig at a school when we have a real paid show the same night". Although I understand that some gigs may seem "bigger" than others, I'd stray away from actively ignoring a gig just because it's a "charity gig at a school". You don't really know who will be there, school gigs can be pretty crazy. It could be better than the other gig - you won't know until you play it.

Timing

Generally speaking the band should be at a venue at least an hour before they begin to play. 

From your post the charity gig is:

- same day as the paid gig
- only three hours before
- 30 miles away 

When does the charity gig end? You may not be able to do it anyway.

If it starts at 3pm, and you play 2 hours (same as the paying gig) until 5pm, and then you have a gig at 6pm (with a 30 mile drive, which will be around 30 minutes), you'll be late to the paying gig (factoring loadout of charity gig, and loadin to paying gig).

Actual plan from the above

1. Figure out if you can actually make it to the paying gig one hour before it starts. If not, cancel the charity gig.
2. If you can, ask singer if they can hold back during the charity gig for a one hour set. Or do a chilled dinnertime set, no need for loud rock music at 3pm in the afternoon.
3. If the singer cannot, cancel the charity and try to find a replacement band for yourself.

This seems like top-notch advice. Thank you. I'll have a chat with the band when we next meet up and take all this into account.

Quote by Phil Starr
The conventional approach is to do the first gig you are booked for, even if the second gig is 'better'. Quite apart from the moral issues you really don't want to get a reputation for letting people down. You need to have a way of checking everyone's availability too in future. Get a band diary.

Try not to fall out over it though, just say you are really sorry you can't do the School gig, maybe offer to do it on a different day. I'm assuming the paying gig was booked first?

That's what I thought too. It's a bit of an odd one because the guitarist had just always kind of assumed we'd do the school gig although we didn't have a set date. After we booked the paid gig we found out it'd be the same day, and then it got moved back from early afternoon to mid afternoon which is causing all kinds of problems as I mentioned. Thank you though, it's good to know I'm not alone in thinking these things!
Quote by Andron17
Go away, I have an erection.


Bassist for Half My Kingdom.
#5
TJ1991 Hi dude, glad you liked my response.

For the charity gig I'd find out ASAP whether your band can do it rather than waiting till next time, as you'll be screwing over the organisers of that gig if you leave it later.

Contact your guitarist and query what time it ends.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Maybe you can do the charity gig with original singer just doing a lighter set, but your commitment should be to your full time singer and the main gig.
If you can't get away from doing the charity gig, do it with a backup singer as a one time thing as a no show you look a lot worse than any other options, apologize to full time singer.