#1
I change tunings alot, usually from standard to half a step down and back up to standard, and strings keep breaking. Its becoming really frustrating. I use an electronic tuner so I know I'm not going too high. it'll work fine for a few weeks and then it happens. It is usually the hi e string but a couple others have broken. I tried slowing down when I tune the high e and that helps it from breaking for longer but eventually it still breaks. Do you guys have this problem? I see people performing live that just rip through different tunings quickly and never break a string. Any idea what I'm doing wrong? I have 2 acoustics and it happens on both. Should I keep one in standard and one half a step down to prevent this? kind of a pain in the ass but I'm about ready to quit over it.
#2
I try to avoid changing tunings too often, and keep two or more guitars in different tunings. I've formed the impression that the core wires of some brands are more prone to breakage than others, so you could try a different brand of string. I use John pearse phos bronze, and rarely have a string break.
#3
where does the string break?  Is it above the nut, below the nut, at the saddle, or just random places?
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#4
It usually breaks closer to the neck. It happens when I'm downing down or on multiple guitars so it's gotta be something I'm doing unless guitars aren't meant to be tuned up and down as much as I do. I can sometimes do it back and forth multiple times a day. is that the problem?
#5
Maybe lube the nut, make sure there's no burrs or anything. 
Considered leaving it tuned down a half step, and then just playing with a capo on the first fret when you want to play in concert pitch?
Or swapping out the high E for a thicker gauge?
I know plenty of folks that go back and forth with drop D, but a low E string is probably going to be much more resilient. 
#6
Quote by Tony Done
I try to avoid changing tunings too often, and keep two or more guitars in different tunings. 

Yes, me too. Two or three guitars kept in the main tunings you use is the way to go. 
#7
Quote by drb1982
unless guitars aren't meant to be tuned up and down as much as I do. I can sometimes do it back and forth multiple times a day. is that the problem?

Yes, this is your problem. Every time you tune and de-tune the strings, you stress the metal.  This eventually causes "metal fatigue", weakening the molecular structure of the string and leading to premature breakage. Have you ever bent a coat hanger back and forth until it breaks? Same principle at work. 

Pedal steel players are very familiar with this phenomenon. On a pedal steel, strings get tuned and de-tuned with pedals and levers.  The strings that get the most "pedal use" are prone to breakage on a fairly regular basis. We all carry spares and try to replace the worst offenders before they break at inconvenient times. (like during a hot solo at a gig). 

Your strings should last a lot longer if you tune them to one pitch and leave them. Since you have 2 acoustics, the best solution (and the one the pros use) is to have a dedicated guitar for each tuning.  If using a separate guitar for each tuning is not the way you want to go, you can tune a half step down, and put a capo on the first fret when you want to be in concert pitch. 
#8
Kind of weird, specially taking in mind that you just go 1 semitone down/up. I can tune my acoustic down to like B and back up without the strings getting damaged in any way.

As Frogstar said, try lubing the nut and checking if nothing is broken.
How does this thing Works ??!?!
#9
Quote by FrogstarWorldA
Maybe lube the nut, make sure there's no burrs or anything. 

I suspect that this will greatly reduce string breakage.
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#10
Are you playing "monkey style"? Know what I mean? That's just pretty much banging your knuckles over the strings, retard-clawhammer I call it. It's fun, sounds better than you might think, and is 100% ridiculous.