#1
After playing for a while I'm in a band for the first time and have started to have to take my gear a little more seriously. Turns out I'm not a big fan of doing a tap dance on my pedal board, especially in a live setting.

Like I said I traditionally haven't been a gear head so I just found out that they make devices that you can run your pedals into and create different combos and asign them a footswitch. The Carl Martin Octaswitcher was one I was looking at for instance.

That one seems a little complicated though. I wondered if someone could recommend one that fits my needs.

I need one that can do 1 clean, 1 dirty, 1 dirty w/effects and a tuner.

Here's my gear:
Engl E650
Engl Z5 footswitch (want to eliminate)
Tuner, OD, delay, reverb, Sonic Maximizer
One Spot daisy chain

Is there one you'd recommend for my set up? One with 3-4 switches instead of 8?

Thanks in advance
#2
Keep It Simple Sherlock

In a live setting resist the temptation to dance all over the pedal board.  Unless you are touring with Sting and making $5k/night just find a setting that works for each song and go with that.  Punch in a boost for solos if needed or just roll on the guitar volume to 10.  One simple switch to activate both delay and reverb might make sense depending on your music.  Sometimes less is more.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
The Octa really isn't complex. You plug in pedals to the back, and then use the dip switches to set which pedals are active for each of the 8 foot switches. Depending on your settings, tapping a single switch could activate/deactivate 0-8 positions.

I believe Voodoo Labs makes a similar but smaller device with 4 switches.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
moksdrunk So you need a 3 channel looper it seems? I would not worry about one just for the tuner, as most tuners will mute the signal. Just place it before the looper. Type in "pedal looper" into the google and see what you find. There are many options. Part of having a great-sounding board, though, is knowing how to change a lot of settings fast- sometimes with the help of the looper, sometimes being smart with your timing. And having good balance.

Cajundaddy I wonder what your advice would be to a shoegaze artist.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 7, 2017,
#5
Quote by Will Lane
moksdrunk So you need a 3 channel looper it seems? I would not worry about one just for the tuner, as most tuners will mute the signal. Just place it before the looper. Type in "pedal looper" into the google and see what you find. There are many options. Part of having a great-sounding board, though, is knowing how to change a lot of settings fast- sometimes with the help of the looper, sometimes being smart with your timing. And having good balance.

Cajundaddy I wonder what your advice would be to a shoegaze artist.

With a dead-simple pedal board like this player has, my advice would be the same.  No need for a looper at all.  If his pedal board looked like The Edge or John Mayer's, a looper makes a lot of sense.  Different tools for different needs and setups.  So many newbies just starting out playing live deeply overthink and overcomplicate this stuff.  A long time ago in a land far away I was one of those overcomplicating newbies too.  

Protip: Focus on the music and keep the gear simple.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at May 7, 2017,
#6
Cajundaddy

Put differently, do the most with the least.*


* not that I live by those words
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
If you start running into tap dancing with your pedal board, the first way to deal with would be with one of the solutions you've already identified. 

The second way would be to look into one of the modelers. If you're going to need to change multiple pedals at a time, the modelers allow you to do all of that with a single stomp. Even with simple things -- say you want to adjust a single effect's parameters from one measure to another, from a lot to a little. That can be nearly impossible to do accurately with a toe. With the modeler, two separate user presets will do the job.  With more complicated changes, the modeler really offers unparalleled simplicity -- two separate user presets will change a bunch of effects with a single stomp. The modeler I'm currently using offers four separate FX loops so that you can change groups of existing pedals. It also offers amp switching, if you're doing that. And, of course, you can change anything in its library of FX internally, including the order in which they appear in your FX chain. All with a single stomp
#8
moksdrunk I won't speak too much on the looper deal.  I've done it before to create "channels" on a clean amp.  It worked well.  Depending on the need of the band, the guitarist, and the style it makes sense.  That said, you have a multi channel amp with cleans and dirt.  You suggest you want to rid yourself of the footswitch, but you also want a loop triggered clean.  Logic would say you're intending on running your amp clean and stacking pedals via loop to reach your tone.  Not sure about that one, especially since it seems your motive is not having to select a channel then select an effect.  

On a note I feel more passionately about: get yourself a volume pedal.  True-Bypss, no tone coloring, volume control (many guitarists adjust on guitar anyway) and many have a Tuner out.  You roll off the volume and the tuner activates automatically.  to me it makes sense for just about every rig.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#9
Quote by dspellman
If you start running into tap dancing with your pedal board, the first way to deal with would be with one of the solutions you've already identified. 

The second way would be to look into one of the modelers. If you're going to need to change multiple pedals at a time, the modelers allow you to do all of that with a single stomp. Even with simple things -- say you want to adjust a single effect's parameters from one measure to another, from a lot to a little. That can be nearly impossible to do accurately with a toe. With the modeler, two separate user presets will do the job.  With more complicated changes, the modeler really offers unparalleled simplicity -- two separate user presets will change a bunch of effects with a single stomp. The modeler I'm currently using offers four separate FX loops so that you can change groups of existing pedals. It also offers amp switching, if you're doing that. And, of course, you can change anything in its library of FX internally, including the order in which they appear in your FX chain. All with a single stomp


Thanks for your response! I think that's a bit more than I need. I really only need 3 tones, clean, dirty and dirty with effects. The problem is I use both my head and an OD pedal for my dirty sound and I don't care to step on 2 pedals to go back and forth between clean and dirty.
#10
For live gigs I typically use 4 different gain levels: "Fender clean", "Blues OD", "Mesa OD", "Modern hi gain".  Each is selected at the beginning of the song and I rarely punch a pedal mid-song.  Maybe a boost pedal or roll on the guitar volume for solos.  Chorus, flange, wah, delay, and Rev, are also usually selected between songs, while occasionally kicking in an effect for a solo.  No pedal dance for the stuff I play.  For new songs I often make setting notes on the set list until I have done it a while and just know where to go.  [ OCD> Del> Rev] 
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
I would look into one of the loopers that gives you control of amp channel switching functions. And while your board seems nice and uncluttered, a nice pedal switching system can really open up a lot of possibilities, such as turning off/on multiple FX at once, midi controlling pedals like a Strymon or Timeline, etc. 

One switcher that can do that is the EFX MKIV, plenty of loops to add more pedals, stereo loops for stereo FX, midi control.

Another option is one of those new Boss loop switching systems, those seem to be pretty good as well, but pricey. 

Another option if you can find it is one of those FreeTheTone switching systems, which are nice. 

And last but not least, if you can find it, it'll probably be cheap: a Loopholic 4 or 5 pedal switching system. They are not as functional as some of the others, but they will get you amp channel switching capabilities, midi switching capabilities, 8 or 10 loops, stereo output, and pre- and post-amp FX. 
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