#1
My Nashville Telecaster I have from my brother sounds kind of tinny and metallic. Do they all sound this way? I do not like it. I think the sound is coming from the bridge.
#2
The bridge single coil on a start or Tele will sound somewhat shrill unless you're running it through a pretty bass heavy amp, like a cranked plexi.

Use the neck pickup - that's where the magic is. 
#3
The neck pickup is terrible. It is too thin. 
#4
Quote by reverb66

Use the neck pickup - that's where the magic is. 


wait what?

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#5
Quote by NostraHistoria
The neck pickup is terrible. It is too thin. 

 It shouldn't sound significantly thinner than a Strat - maybe the pickups are the problem.   What amp are you using?
#6
All the ones in my signature. 
#9
Quote by NostraHistoria
All the ones in my signature. 

With the exception of the AC30 if it's set clean, you shouldn't be getting thin sounds from those amps.  Maybe the pickups are the issue. I'm not a fan of rolling the tone knob back as it just neuters tone more than anything - it'll just dull it.  Have you compared it to your Strats?  


 
#10
I am a little too busy to compare them, but the tones out of it have never satisfied me. 
#12
Telecasters wont sound any 'thinner' than most other single coil guitars so what are you comparing it to? My telecaster is never shrill sounding especially compared to my Strat. Mine is a cruddy affinity too.
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#13
Quote by NostraHistoria
My Nashville Telecaster I have from my brother sounds kind of tinny and metallic. Do they all sound this way? I do not like it. I think the sound is coming from the bridge.

Yep. That's how they sound. If you wan it to sound different change the pickups - but even then they still have a distinct tinny sound.
#15
Quote by flexiblemile
AM I the only one that thinks there is something wrong with his guitar?

No you aren't.
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#16
H4T3BR33D3R

Right? This guy obviously has a bunch of guitars and amps. If it sounds way too shrill, it's likely not a matter of taste. I get that they're brighter even for strats but he's got strats and an AC30. He should be used to bright sounds

Was the guitar bought new?

Can you post samples?
#17
It was new. My brother got it from Guitar Center. 

I cannot post samples. Sorry. I am planning to make a studio soon. Maybe I will have more space when I do it.

When I play the Telecaster without an amp, I get bad, metallic sounds. It does not sound good. 
#19
Really depends on the Tele.  My 07' Affinity does not sound thin or metallic except when clean, and that's just the normal ratio/EQ of the Tele, not something excessively so.

When I bought that guitar I pitted it against a Mexican Tele, a 52' Reissue, and a Custom Shop Tele, I found the warmest sounding one of the lot was the Affinity so that's the one I bought 10 years ago.  The others were better setup but something special about that particular Squier.  I even tried another to see if I was crazy and I was not, the other Affinity did not even come close.  Must have been a happy day at the Yako factory.

Teles do have a bit more treble content, and are a little bit more metallic sounding because of that large bridgeplate the bridge pickup is housed in, but excessively so and you either have weak pickups, or maybe the type of metal used in the bridge is too solid for the guitar to help it's sound.

Another thing that warmed up the pickups was when I wax potted them.  I've noticed Wax Potting takes the edge off your pickups a little bit, because there's less stuff moving around in there which may increase the treble/higher side of the high mids content from my experience.  Usually if I have a tinny sounding guitar I don't like the sound of - that is what I do with it - it's not just for making them not squeal (sometimes that's the real catch 22 like I'm struggling with with my Harmony H-802 pickups).
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Last edited by Mad-Mike_J83 at May 11, 2017,
#20
My new strat just came in the mail today. When it is unplugged, it sounds metallic, since the low E buzzes. I just realized that my guitars have high action. I am not an expert on guitars and guitar tones. I just play them to make music. 
#21
Here is something you might try... 

This is something that may need to be done when a bolt on neck guitar is brand new or has had some service done on it (like a re-fret job) during which the neck was removed. What happens in both cases is there is a time in the process where the neck is bolted firmly to the body before the strings are put on and brought up to tune.
When the neck is bolted to the body without the strings on, there is no pressure between the butt end of the neck and the guitar body in the end of neck pocket... so there can even be a slight gap. This tends to isolate the neck from the body from a vibration conduction perspective.

Here is what you do:

- with the strings on the guitar tuned up...
- very slowly loosen the neck screws turning each one just a tiny bit, moving from screw to screw, so they all gradually loosen together
- there will come a point where the 80lbs or so of string tension overcomes the friction in the neck pocket
- when that happens the neck will shift deeper into the pocket and make a very firm butt end contact with the body
- you will feel it as a fast little movement; if there was much of a gap you may hear it make a "knock" or a "pop" sound
- after this happens, re-tighten the neck screws

Now, the neck is captured in the pocket by the neck screws with about 80lbs or so of pressure applied against the body of the guitar, so maximal mechanical conduction. This pressure is not lost during a string change, but if you happen to remove the neck you'll want to repeat it.

Try it and see how different it sounds... this little neck-pop thing has saved many "off sounding" guitars...
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#22
I use to hate teles when I was in my teens. This guy in a group i played with did not get along with me and i always thought his sound was so 1 dimensional. Every thing he played had a twang whether it was acdc or the beatles it sounded like it belonged in a country band. Now im very fond of teles but that doesnt help you much.
#23
Quote by PlusPaul
Here is something you might try... 

This is something that may need to be done when a bolt on neck guitar is brand new or has had some service done on it (like a re-fret job) during which the neck was removed. What happens in both cases is there is a time in the process where the neck is bolted firmly to the body before the strings are put on and brought up to tune.
When the neck is bolted to the body without the strings on, there is no pressure between the butt end of the neck and the guitar body in the end of neck pocket... so there can even be a slight gap. This tends to isolate the neck from the body from a vibration conduction perspective.

Here is what you do:

- with the strings on the guitar tuned up...
- very slowly loosen the neck screws turning each one just a tiny bit, moving from screw to screw, so they all gradually loosen together
- there will come a point where the 80lbs or so of string tension overcomes the friction in the neck pocket
- when that happens the neck will shift deeper into the pocket and make a very firm butt end contact with the body
- you will feel it as a fast little movement; if there was much of a gap you may hear it make a "knock" or a "pop" sound
- after this happens, re-tighten the neck screws

Now, the neck is captured in the pocket by the neck screws with about 80lbs or so of pressure applied against the body of the guitar, so maximal mechanical conduction. This pressure is not lost during a string change, but if you happen to remove the neck you'll want to repeat it.

Try it and see how different it sounds... this little neck-pop thing has saved many "off sounding" guitars...

Interesting. The neck seems a little tighter and stronger than on my other guitars. I never would have though it was the neck that was causing it. 
#24
A Tele bridge PU has a lot of bite by design.  For chick'n pick'n you can never have too much bite.   

 If you don't need so much bite you can sell the guitar or get darker PUs.  Or do what Robben Ford, Jimmy Page, Joe Bonamassa, Mike Bloomfield, and John 5 often do which is simply roll off the tone knob to taste.  There are a lot of very good tones in that bridge PU if you take the time to explore them.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at May 13, 2017,
#25
Is this the Deluxe Nashville with the Vintage Noiseless pickups? Those definitely shouldn't be super - bright compared to true single coil guitars, with which it sounds like you're familiar. Especially the middle one, which is a Strat pickup.
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#26
The neck has a silver lipstick (?) PU. The middle has a white one. The bridge is black.
#27
Quote by NostraHistoria
The neck has a silver lipstick (?) PU. The middle has a white one. The bridge is black.

K. The middle pickup is a Strat pickup. Presumably you have a good feel for how a middle Strat pickup sounds normally.
Death to Ovation haters!