#3
monwobobbo alright I've noticed that the back of those cabs it has 2 input jacks that confuses me do you know how many ohms that these cabs are?
#5
monwobobbo okay so final run down on half stacks i got a 100w tube head and say i have a 4x12 cab and its rated at say 4 ohms so i would then plug a speaker cable in the 4 ohm jack in the back of the head and run it into the 4 ohm cab and everything will be okay and the equipment will be safe?as long as the ohms coming from the amp match what the cab is rated for?
#7
monwobobbo i got the cable under control! i got those speaker cables on the way now from guitar center thanks for the help! i will say tho im watching a video of a line 6 cab and it has stereo and mono inputs on the cab how do i know what input on the cab do i put my cable in?
#8
Quote by monwobobbo
MarshallTone  yes. you also have to use the proper cord. don't use a guitar cord make sure it's a proper speaker cord. 

+1.

Do not use an instrument cable when connecting speakers. The difference in resistance in the hot and the shield on an instrument cable is too large and the wire itself is nowhere near a heavy enough gauge to handle the wattage that is being put through it. Use a speaker cable. Speaker cables are not shielded like instrument cables are, and are instead simply 2 thick wires soldered onto a standard 1/4" jack.
Quote by MarshallTone
monwobobbo i got the cable under control! i got those speaker cables on the way now from guitar center thanks for the help! i will say tho im watching a video of a line 6 cab and it has stereo and mono inputs on the cab how do i know what input on the cab do i put my cable in?

Use the mono input and ensure the impedance of the amp and the cabinet are the same.

The impedance of the amplifier can actually be higher than that of the cabinet and the amp will still work fine. You'll just get less volume. What you need to be careful of is to ensure that the impedance of the cabinet is not less than the minimum of the amp.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#11
Quote by MarshallTone
monwobobbo i know that but i just have 3 speaker out put jacks on the head  4, 8, and 16ohms so do i need to go just mono? and why?

Guitar amps typically don't run in stereo unless you're running multiple amps.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#12
Quote by MarshallTone
monwobobbo i got the cable under control! i got those speaker cables on the way now from guitar center thanks for the help! i will say tho im watching a video of a line 6 cab and it has stereo and mono inputs on the cab how do i know what input on the cab do i put my cable in?

It will tell you on the cab jack plate how to properly hook it up for mono or stereo use.  Unless you have a stereo head like a Fender Mustang you will only use one of the speaker outs on your amp head and plug it into the jack on the speaker cab marked mono. Just be sure to use the output of the amp with the matching ohms of the cab.  You can also run 2 mono heads on the same cab in stereo you just need to make sure that the wattage of each amp doesn't exceed the one half of the cab.

Edit: Since you just mentioned the cab having a switch just make sure it's set to mono.  It will have it all labeled for you on the cab.
Last edited by Way Cool JR. at May 10, 2017,
#13
T00DEEPBLUE the line 6 cabs have a switch on the jack plate to switch from stereo to mono so if i just plug in any 100w tube head and i use this cab and say i choose the 8ohm output on the head i just go to the cab set the switch to 8ohms mono and plug it in the mono jack? and im good to rock?
#15
I'm curious, what amp is it?
Quote by MarshallTone
T00DEEPBLUE the line 6 cabs have a switch on the jack plate to switch from stereo to mono so if i just plug in any 100w tube head and i use this cab and say i choose the 8ohm output on the head i just go to the cab set the switch to 8ohms mono and plug it in the mono jack? and im good to rock?

Yes.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#17
Way Cool JR. one more question man!  the line 6 cab can do 4 and 8 ohms mono because it has the switch and my head has a 4ohm and a  8 ohm speaker output so which do i use? 4 or 8 ohms? i can match ohms on both 4 and 8 ohms so which one?
#18
Quote by MarshallTone
Way Cool JR. one more question man!  the line 6 cab can do 4 and 8 ohms mono because it has the switch and my head has a 4ohm and a  8 ohm speaker output so which do i use? 4 or 8 ohms? i can match ohms on both 4 and 8 ohms so which one?

Either works. As long as the impedance matches, it doesn't matter.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#20
Quote by MarshallTone
T00DEEPBLUE alright can you tell me why we have the 4 and 8 ohm options? does one run differently than the other? more power? more volume?

if you run 2 cabs off of one head then that changes the ohms 
#21
Quote by MarshallTone
T00DEEPBLUE alright can you tell me why we have the 4 and 8 ohm options? does one run differently than the other? more power? more volume?

Not all cabinets have the same impedance as one another. This depends on the impedance of the speaker(s) and the way they're wired to each other.

Cabinets that have their speakers wired in series have a total impedance that is the sum of the speakers wired together. A 2x12 cabinet that has 8ohm speakers wired in series would result in a 16 ohm cabinet.

Speakers wired in parallel lowers the impedance instead of raising it. If the same 2x12 cabinet with 8 ohm speakers were wired together in parallel, the total impedance of the cabinet would be 4 ohms.

The reason why these configurations exist is to help match the impedance of the cabinet with the amplifier that is driving it. Not all amplifiers ever made give you the option to run a cabinet at different impedances. So some cabinets have impedance selectors that change the way the speakers are wired so that the amplifier and cabinet can still be matched to one another. This also becomes useful when running multiple cabinets off a single amp.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#22
T00DEEPBLUE alright well the amp head and cab lets me chose 4 or 8 so which one do i generally need to lean on since it can do both? the cab im getting is a line 6 4x12 cab used at guitar center
#23
Quote by MarshallTone
T00DEEPBLUE alright well the amp head and cab lets me chose 4 or 8 so which one do i generally need to lean on since it can do both? the cab im getting is a line 6 4x12 cab used at guitar center

As I've already answered, both work. So long as the impedance matches at both ends, it doesn't matter what you choose to use.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#24
T00DEEPBLUE i understand that but since i have the option between the two what do you choose? if you were me and you had to choose 4 or 8 ohms to run the amp and cab which one would you pick and why?
#25
Quote by MarshallTone
T00DEEPBLUE i understand that but since i have the option between the two what do you choose? if you were me and you had to choose 4 or 8 ohms to run the amp and cab which one would you pick and why?



It. Doesn't. Matter.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#26
Quote by MarshallTone
T00DEEPBLUE i understand that but since i have the option between the two what do you choose? if you were me and you had to choose 4 or 8 ohms to run the amp and cab which one would you pick and why?

as long as things match up the amp and cab don't care which you use. won't change the sound
#28
monwobobbo now say i had 2 cabs  and i wanted to run the head thru both to make a full stack as long as the ohms match or it isnt to over powering do i just use the 4 and the 8 ohm outputs on the head to run a full stack?
#29
I just want to add that since this is your first tube head be sure to never turn it on without a speaker cab being connected tube amps need to have a load or dummy load like a power attenuator. Without a load you run the risk of damaging the power transformer the tubes or both.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
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#30
When running 2 cabs, the amp will 'see' them in parallel, so 2 16ohm cabs would be an 8ohm load, 2 8ohm cabs would be a 4ohm load. This is when both are plugged into the back of the amp, not daisy-chained together. That's a whole other can of worms  
My Gear:- A guitar, a guitar lead, a guitar amplifier. Or sometimes just an acoustic guitar!
#31
anguskilminstercan you plug one cab in the 16 ohm jack on the back of the head and the other cab into the 8 ohm slot on the back of the head providing that the impedance matches on both cabs?
#32
MarshallTone That is something I don't know, but I would say that you can only use one cab at a time with your head if you only have the choices you mentioned.
My Gear:- A guitar, a guitar lead, a guitar amplifier. Or sometimes just an acoustic guitar!