#1
Yo guys,

Hopefully there's some keys players on here?

I have this big ass Alesis keyboard that we've been using for a couple years, it's pretty old.

Pros:
It has great effect choices. Hundreds of options.
Full size

Cons:
Sooo clunky
Hate moving this thing, weighs easily 40 pounds, ahah.
Not that it's REALLY a con, but I don't use 95% of the effects
Can't plug into my looper

SO,

I'm looking for something that's
1) got a solid range of effects. If there are just some good string options, a good piano tone or two, and some cool synth stuff, that's enough.
2) needs to be more portable - something I could move on my own would be cool. It's hard to believe that the one I have weighs 40 pounds or so but it's true, ahahah.
3) Plug into an RC-3 with just one input. My Alesis has to be plugged in stereo.

I see a lot of keyboards, but I'm having trouble finding one with a lot of effects + being compact...

Thanks homies!
#3
Will Lane

Thanks for the help. I am not quite sure how keyboard/DAW stuff works that well, but I looked it up a bit. Do I need to have a CPU and interface with me all the time? And the VSTI's are basically "effects" that I can run through any keyboard and get that sound?
#4
Quote by Yorkeson
Will Lane

Thanks for the help. I am not quite sure how keyboard/DAW stuff works that well, but I looked it up a bit. Do I need to have a CPU and interface with me all the time? And the VSTI's are basically "effects" that I can run through any keyboard and get that sound?

You would need a computer yes, not an interface though. Most MIDI controllers can operate just through a USB connection from the controller to your laptop. You could consider the VSTi's as effects, but really they are the sounds entirely. MIDI controllers do not output sound but rather a MIDI signal, which that signal triggers the VSTi to make sound. Ultimately I have found MIDI controllers and VSTi's to be easier to operate than the typical keyboard with its own software in it. And likely MIDI/VSTi will be a lot less expensive as well, there are many freeware VSTi's that sound great.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 12, 2017,
#5
Will Lane

The computer aspect seems unappealing kind of... I am definitely going to look into that and think about it. My laptop isn't great but would probably suffice.

Do you have any suggestions that don't go that route?

Someone recommended my a Roland Juno DS-61 and I think that looks pretty cool if I can get one used?
#6
I have mostly big, clunky keyboards (76 key, 88 key). What will save you some space/weight is a shorter keyboard (61 key). Unless you're doing keyboard concertos, you'll still be able to access all 88 keys, but you'll have to switch octaves to do that. 

Another thought is simply to get a very lightweight keyboard that doesn't have much of anything on it. Something like an M-Audio Keystation doesn't weigh much because there's not much inside (and doesn't have a seriously complex weighted keyboard). It's designed to be used via MIDI with an external  synthagizmo. I have an 88-key version, for example, that I use with a 61-key Korg. The latter has all the goods, but the former has all the space. I can also use it with a rack synth (don't go taking computers out to play live -- it can lead to tears <G>
#7
dspellman

Thanks so much man! This is an interesting set up, sounds kind of cool? I agree that I am thinking 61 key, def don't need 88 - I do have access to a decent Wurlitzer when I want to play. I'll look into this.

And that's exactly what I was thinking about the laptop... I already don't trust me and the band rocking around it, much less the drunken fans ahahah.
Last edited by Yorkeson at May 12, 2017,
#8
At the top of my game playing synth in a metal band I had a couple controllers with rack units.  One was for my synth stuff and the other was for the "natural" sounds.  I also had a Korg Micro just for ass-sounding distorted synth (ran a pedal board with a fuzz, distortion, octave, and reverb pedal).  It worked well though.  One went into a sound module for piano, organ, and orchestral type sounds.  The other went into a moog module.  Then everything went into a rack mixer, and that went into a crossover, and the seperate signals went into either of two amp stacks.  Moral of the story, this is where I landed after I realized how crazy it was I was moving around 5 keyboards and a drum machine on top of the rack unit and amps.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#9
Quote by Badluckpalms
At the top of my game playing synth in a metal band I had a couple controllers with rack units.  One was for my synth stuff and the other was for the "natural" sounds.  I also had a Korg Micro just for ass-sounding distorted synth (ran a pedal board with a fuzz, distortion, octave, and reverb pedal).  It worked well though.  One went into a sound module for piano, organ, and orchestral type sounds.  The other went into a moog module.  Then everything went into a rack mixer, and that went into a crossover, and the seperate signals went into either of two amp stacks.  Moral of the story, this is where I landed after I realized how crazy it was I was moving around 5 keyboards and a drum machine on top of the rack unit and amps.  


The good news is that all of that rack stuff is now hiding in a single keyboard; I think the Korg Kronos I have has nine different sound engines. I do have an 88 key keyboard that goes along, but it's essential function is just to give me another place to put my hands <G>.  

Nothing's lightweight (I have one of the old two-tier AX-90 keyboard stands as well). But that's what lackeys are for. 
More or less this (but with a 76 key on top):

#10
If you think 40 lbs is bad, do not look into the Akai MPK 88 (I have one - a nearly 70 lb, 88-fully weighted key beast)

Ultimately, you will likely have to make some compromises between weight/portability, and features. Higher numbers of keys, fully weighted keys, and additional buttons/knobs are going to make for a more cumbersome keyboard.

One option might be to get an inexpensive, basic controller (Alesis or M-Audio), and use it to control VSTs from a laptop, or possibly a rack unit if you don't mind doing it the old school way (Racks seem to be getting less popular these days, so you can sometimes score quality gear for good prices). Something like a Keystation 61 or 88 is pretty bare bones, but it'd make for a more lightweight option.

If money isn't an issue, another option might be to get a smaller version (61-key) of a higher end keyboard, like a Korg Kronos.

You could also simply look into something like a road case w/wheels to make transporting a large, heavier keyboard/key setup less of a PITA.
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
Last edited by FlightofIcarus at May 13, 2017,