#1
I connect a Sennheiser e906 mic to a Roland V-Studio 100 to record my guitar amp.   

Would using a DI give me better results?  
#2
No and yes. If your amp is not of solid quality, you may get better results using amp and cab sims on just a direct guitar signal. But many, many albums were cut with a mic up to a guitar amp, so "better results" depends on a lot of things. And personally, I would not want to be using a portable studio like that, they are not me. A computer DAW seems much more accessible.

Another variable is if your V-studio converts the raw recording to a compressed file before you can get it off the V-studio, the compression settings may be causing you to loose a lot of signal quality.
#3
Will Lane The V-Studio 100 is the interface I use connected to my laptop running Cakewalk Sonar Professional.  I don't record directly to the VS-100.  
Would a different interface make a difference?  
Thank you for the reply.  
#4
Quote by Gosss
Will Lane The V-Studio 100 is the interface I use connected to my laptop running Cakewalk Sonar Professional.  I don't record directly to the VS-100.  
Would a different interface make a difference?  
Thank you for the reply.  

I am not sure of the quality of the V-Studio compared to something like the Mackie or Focusrite units. I would not think your quality would be so lacking with the V-Studio.

Is there a specific quality issue you are experiencing? Pops, clicks, artifacting, etc? Are you editing the audio in post? What are your purposes for the audio? What amp are you using?
#5
The answer is probably marginal better results. Now, there are some DIs that sound downright godly, have expensive transformer and tube chains, like the UA610 but I doubt that you'd be going in that price bracket.

I have higher end DIs than what my audio interface has and I can say the difference is marginal and not necessarily groundbreaking to want to dump what you have.

Here I did an A/B comparison between a $1600 two channel DI/preamp chain vs my generic clean Presonus XMAX preamps, if you care to listen:
https://soundcloud.com/egregoreband/sets/joe-meek-twinq-vs-presonus-xmax-preamps

Give us the rest of your chain, it is quite possibly something else is making you unhappy about the sound. Most likely it is on the production side for most of us.
#6
I'm not sure if Mackie or Focusrite are better quality either.  I get no pops or clicks.  Don't know what you mean by editing in post?  I intend to upload audio to YouTube.  I record different parts using different amps at times.  Mainly an EVH 5150 III with a Fender 1x12 cab and a Marshall DSL combo amp.  Other times I record a Fender Super Champ X2 combo and once in a while an old Crate GX-30M combo.  
#7
Quote by diabolical
The answer is probably marginal better results. Now, there are some DIs that sound downright godly, have expensive transformer and tube chains, like the UA610 but I doubt that you'd be going in that price bracket.

I have higher end DIs than what my audio interface has and I can say the difference is marginal and not necessarily groundbreaking to want to dump what you have.  

Here I did an A/B comparison between a $1600 two channel DI/preamp chain vs my generic clean Presonus XMAX preamps, if you care to listen:
https://soundcloud.com/egregoreband/sets/joe-meek-twinq-vs-presonus-xmax-preamps

Give us the rest of your chain, it is quite possibly something else is making you unhappy about the sound. Most likely it is on the production side for most of us.

Thanks Diabolical.  I guess I'm ok with my set up.  If the sound quality was a greater difference I would go with adding a DI.  I just thought for some reason adding a DI would improve sound quality having watched a few Glen Fricker from Spectre Studios YouTube videos where he suggests using one.  

As for my sound chain:

One of the amps mentioned above > Sennheiser e906 > Roland V-Studio 100 (no EQ no Compression) > Sonar Professional.  
Last edited by Gosss at May 18, 2017,
#8
Ohhhhh, good old Glen...I watch him sometimes for the entertainment. I don't know what he means about DI boxes, probably he's referring to people with audio cards that clip, the Focusrite low end ones, can't remember model.

You should be fine with what you have. "Post", I meant "post recording" which maybe was misleading...eq, compression, mastering...once you've recorded it, i.e. the final product.

BTW - there are benefits to a good DI box but I think you have one built into your interface that is pretty decent. You can get a Radial passive DI, those are great, if you're needing one and can afford it. The cheaper ones under $100 are really not worth it. You might want to look into coloring DI box, something with analog tubes to impart a bit more grit, etc. or a tube preamp channel for when you're miking. One of my favorite tricks is to actually cook the tube preamp input a bit with hotter signal and you get sweeter harmonics on metal rhythm plus you can lower the gain on the amp for some clarity. Also useful for aggressive vocals, it brings in a nice touch of grit that you don't get otherwise...it all could be faked in mixing though, I just liked to bypass a lot of the second guessing game and track with all these effects applied.
#9
Just so it is clear a D.I. is not a preamp. It is to match impedance. low impedance mic level to high impedance line livel or vise versa. For an example if you plugged the output of a hifi stereo into the input of a guitar amp it will not soung great because the guitar amp wants to see a low impedance guitar siginal and the stereo outputs high impedance to drive a speaker coil. So you would  put a DI in reverse inbetween to match impedance level.
Last edited by electricbunny at Jul 1, 2017,
#10
Quote by electricbunny
Just so it is clear a D.I. is not a preamp. It is to match impedance. low impedance mic level to high impedance line livel or vise versa. For an example if you plugged the output of a hifi stereo into the input of a guitar amp it will not soung great because the guitar amp wants to see a low impedance guitar siginal and the stereo outputs high impedance to drive a speaker coil. So you would  put a DI inbetween to match impedance level.


That example is not right, not unless you use a DI in reverse to convert from line level to guitar level signal. You need to use reamper for that anyway which is better suited, there are active and passive.

DI is used to convert guitar signal level to line level, so the other way around. Some high end DIs can do the reverse well, usually the high end Jensen transformer ones from Radial.
#11
Yea i was talking about using  a passive transformer D.I. in-reverse which i have done for years and years and years to "reamp" tracks. Anyway the example was just an easy to understand explanation on impedance matching. I never really bought into the whole "reamp box" when we started to hear of them in the late 90s. Just using a trasformer in-reverse always works well for me. I edited the post to make it clearer.
Last edited by electricbunny at Jul 1, 2017,
#12
electricbunny the reamp boxes have a few extra filters that minimize noise though. I've also used DIs in reverse as reampers for most of my career and didn't even know they were a thing until the new generation of digital guitarists popped up.