#1
I have a dbz/diamond bird of prey fm which i bought used like new condition, had been played just a few times. When i got it, it had light strings setup for standard tuing and action was way too high to my liking. When in standard the floyd did flutter just fine. Then I went ahead and got a set of .12-.54 d'addario strings (only ones for such gauge they had at local store), lowered action and set up for drop b tuning. After setup the floyd didn't flutter anymore and I did make all action adjustments with strings loose. It does stay in tune perfectly but doesn't flutter. It does it just a bit with the bar at a certain point and when done hardly. Like I have to dive it quite a bit and release it. Any ideas what could be wrong? Maybe string tension? Would it help to add another spring? (Currently has three in there).

Thanks in advance
Last edited by luisg877 at May 13, 2017,
#2
Heavier gauges of strings are not as elastic as lighter gauges, which helps to lend themselves to the fluttering effect.

I would also think that a 54 for drop B would be too light, which aggravates fret buzz and makes it easier to pluck the strings out of tune. I would bump that up to a 60. I also think a 12 for the high C is a bit too heavy and would bump that down to an 11. But that's beside the point.

Adding more springs is not going to make any difference. All that's going to do is force you to re-set up the guitar again.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#3
You've got too much working *against* a flutter at this point. 
Adding a spring will make it worse, I should think. 
#4
Thanks for the replies so far. It's weird because I've seen other people with similar setups and don't have an issue. One thing that came to my mind is that I did loosen the strings when adjusting but springs were still in there. I had a block and everything there but they were still in. I don' know it that would have affected because if it did it should have made the floyd also go out of tune whenever i use it which is not the case. And another thing I noticed is that the bar is starting to come loose a little. Like it does stay in one place when screwed in tight as I like, but it wobbles a little up and down.
#5
Is the bar loose enough that it swings down when you try to flutter? If that's the case, that's why it's not doing it.
Fleet of MiJ Ibanez
Couple of Balls
Peavey & EVH Wolfgangs
Eclipse
Fender HM Strat
Kemper KPA
5150 III 50w & cabs
#6
DarthV no, it's screwed tight all the way in so it stays in one place, it will go down or up, meaning change position over the guitar's body, only if I move it. What I mean is that while it stays in place, it has like a wobble to it. I don't know if I'm explaining it correctly
#7
So you can move the bar up/down a little without changing pitch? If that's the case, possible the trem arm holder is loose?
Fleet of MiJ Ibanez
Couple of Balls
Peavey & EVH Wolfgangs
Eclipse
Fender HM Strat
Kemper KPA
5150 III 50w & cabs
#8
DarthV yes it does that a bit, and also up or down with the guitar in playing position, it stays put, but wobbles a bit in the same place. Didn't use to do that either
#9
Three things cause this

- Loose Parts on Vibrato - the key to getting good Tremolo Flutter out of a Floyd is having EVERYTHING tight where it won't move, at least not luness you want t move it. If the bar is flopping around for example, no tremolo flutter because the bar ABSORBS the vibration of the bridge rather than works in unison with it.

- Bad Knife Edges - The key to tuning stability with any 2 point fulcrum based vibrato is having SHARP knife edges, this low amount of surface area to pivot on means that the surface area of the surface doing the pivoting does not need to compete with an equal or larger surface area that can cause it to hang.

- Misaligned PIvot Posts - These also introduce frcition into the system because it's not sitting square knife edge to pivot post, and this is causing the tremolo to bind and stall rather than flutter.
My Current Mains
- 1996 Fender Jag-Stang with EMG Pickups
- 1998 Fender Jaguar with Cool Rails
- 1982 Hondo Paul Dean II (DiMarzio Super II X2)
- 2010 "Fender" Jazzmaster (Home built)
- 2013 Squier VM Bass VI (stock)
#10
Mad-Mike_J83 Thank you for your info! So basing on that the wobbling is influencing the fluttering effect. Any solution ideas? For the three scenarios if you know how to check/correct them
#11
Quote by luisg877
Mad-Mike_J83 Thank you for your info! So basing on that the wobbling is influencing the fluttering effect. Any solution ideas? For the three scenarios if you know how to check/correct them


Usually the first thing dampening the flutter is your vibrato bar itself. Usually modern Floyds have collared bars, on those, bar tension can be adjusted by taking the bar out, going through the back of the tremolo cavity, and screwing the screw inside back in a little more to raise the bar tension so that it sticks in place. I've fixed this using rubber tire plug bits in the hole as well, or teflon tape.

The old style Floyd Rose bars used a nut through the top and a slotted nut on the bottom that acts as a "Jam Nut" - the top nut and bottom nut are separated from the Floyd Rose frame by a pair of teflon washers. The bar just screws in like a regular Stratocaster. A lot of people don't know but this design was intentional. The idea is that you tighten the nut on the bottom by hand till it "jams" then use a pair of wrenches to tighten it further until you get the desired tension for the bar, then screw the bar into the Floyd, and tighten it with a wrench - and then the whole entire collar assembly is supposed to move with full tension, which allows for all the wiggle/fluttering effects. That's how Brad Gillis of Night Ranger does it I believe as he uses original non-fine-tuner Floyds on his strats.

That's the main problem.

The other problem that causes fluttering not to work are bad or worn knife edges. If the knife edges are a part of the frame of the vibrato, then most likely the vibrato, or at least it's frame, will need replaced. If the guitar has a Floyd Rose II style vibrato, the knife edges are actually steel inserts that slide into the frame and are actually removable and replaceable, that's something not a lot of people don't know about the Floyd Rose II (I own two Floyd Rose II trems - a Jackson branded frankenstein one on my Kramer Striker, and a recent import licensed Pro-Tone unit on my Squier Jagmaster, the Pro Tone flutters amazingly well).
My Current Mains
- 1996 Fender Jag-Stang with EMG Pickups
- 1998 Fender Jaguar with Cool Rails
- 1982 Hondo Paul Dean II (DiMarzio Super II X2)
- 2010 "Fender" Jazzmaster (Home built)
- 2013 Squier VM Bass VI (stock)