#1
I'm a rookie. I changed my strings today and all of them are tune in standard e. I even checked the tunings at the 12th fret and everything checked out good. (The strings are .09s.)

However, my 1st string/high e string is loose and not really playable. I mean it's playable, but it sounds bad. Did I mess something up by taking off all the strings at the same time? Did I ruin something when I broke the string yesterday from a bend? Do I need a new neck/guitar? What gives?

Edit: From the 12th fret, I can lift the high e string 2 centimeters/almost 1 inch.
Last edited by Superdoggy at May 16, 2017,
#2
Have you sufficiently stretched all the strings in?

You need to be more descriptive in how you mean by it sounding 'bad'.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#3
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Have you sufficiently stretched all the strings in?

You need to be more descriptive in how you mean by it sounding 'bad'.


I never stretched them and now I'm afraid to do that. Wouldn't that make it more loose?

It sounds bad- like the notes I play on that string sound warped or like they are drowning in a pool. Almost sounds like I'm doing a curl/mini bend on every note that I fret on that string. When I actually do bend it, it sounds like it's about to die out. And if I play that string without fretting, it sounds dry.
Last edited by Superdoggy at May 15, 2017,
#4
Do you have a tuner that will tell you what octave your high E has been tuned to? 
It's not unusual to find someone has actually tuned the string an octave low under these circumstances. 
#5
Quote by dspellman
Do you have a tuner that will tell you what octave your high E has been tuned to? 
It's not unusual to find someone has actually tuned the string an octave low under these circumstances. 


No, I use a basic snark tuner. The thing is, the string doesn't feel that loose in the headstock area. It's not as tight as the others, but I would think it would be tight enough considering it being so thin and all. But everything between the nut and the bridge is very loose. Is there another way to know what octave its in? Are there any other issues it could be?

Edit: I can easily lift it from the but, so I guess its loose all throughout the string.
Last edited by Superdoggy at May 16, 2017,
#6
You need to stretch all the strings in for them to stay in tune. New strings will always detune when you stretch them, so you re-tune them. Then stretch them again. Keep stretching the strings until they stop detuning.

You're not actually 'stretching' the strings in on an electric guitar because steel strings don't actually stretch very much. What you're actually doing is getting the strings properly kinked and seated around the tuners.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#7
Quote by Superdoggy
No, I use a basic snark tuner. The thing is, the string doesn't feel that loose in the headstock area. It's not as tight as the others, but I would think it would be tight enough considering it being so thin and all. But everything between the nut and the bridge is very loose. Is there another way to know what octave its in? Are there any other issues it could be?

Is it stuck in the nut?
#8
Quote by dspellman
Is it stuck in the nut?

Naw. I just easily lifted it from the nut. I guess its loose all throughout the string.
Last edited by Superdoggy at May 16, 2017,
#10
Does it sound higher in pitch than your b string if it is that loose you may be an octave low. try this method once you know the rest of the strings are in tune:

"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#11
I figured it out. lol.

T00DEEPBLUE Thanks for the feedback. You were the first one to show love and get the thread goin.

dspellman was right from the start. My high e string was an octave low the whole time.

After Evilnine also mentioned the possibility of being in a lower octave this mourning, I decided to search on youtube to see how someone would purposely tune their strings in a lower octave. I found a video showin this.

So I decided to put 2 and 2 together. I decided to be brave and see if it could go another full round of tunin without breakin the string and it worked. And now it feels and sounds proper. Looks like I'm back in full action.

Thanks to all 3 of y'all for the feedback. It kept me hopeful in fixin the situation, instead of doin somethin dumb. Had no one responded today or mentioned the low octave thing again, I most likely would've bought some heavy strings (.11s) or a new guitar against my wishes. Keepin the thread alive with replies is what kept me in motion. I was not gonna ask anyone for help in person.
Last edited by Superdoggy at May 16, 2017,
#12
Quote by Superdoggy


dspellman was right from the start. My high e string was an octave low the whole time. 

Not that I've *ever* done that myself. 

Ever. 

Get a tuner that will tell you what octave you've tuned to. And I promise you, you'll never have that problem again.
 
I've heard. 

They say. 
#13
Good to hear and as always we are glad to help!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge