#1
Hi everyone,

I'm thinking of selling my Gibson ES 330 from 1967 and buying a Gibson ES 335 from 1979 or maybe buying a new Gibson. Would it be a stupid idea when it comes to value and the quality of the guitar?
#2
Quote by Renfield74
Hi everyone,

I'm thinking of selling my Gibson ES 330 from 1967 and buying a Gibson ES 335 from 1979 or maybe buying a new Gibson. Would it be a stupid idea when it comes to value and the quality of the guitar?

Well why are you selling the ES 330? Do you not like P90s and want humbuckers instead? Do you want something that isn't fully hollow? Like there isn't a right or wrong answer for this particular situation but it would help to know your reasoning.
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#3
The p 90s makes a lot of noise and they're a bit sharp for my ears. But I haven't decided yet. But I don't to buy something with less value than aguitar from the 60s.
#4
Well then don't buy a new Gibson because they aren't worth what you pay. 


Also there are a lot of guitars from the 60s that are dirt cheap. A guitar from the 60s doesnt mean its valuable at all. 
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#6
Quote by Renfield74
H4T3BR33D3R Not even the custom shop?

Especially the custom shop. You're severely overpaying for what you get. IMO if you're really that concerned about resale value then buying a brand new CS Gibson is a poor call. 


Try them out yourself if you're really that curious. I don't think they're great personally. 
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#7
Quote by Renfield74
H4T3BR33D3R Not even the custom shop?

Modern Gibson Custom Shop guitars are hideously expensive and you'll lose thousands in depreciation alone when you come to sell it. Modern Gibsons are not seen as being all that valuable in the eyes of collectors unless it's an extremely rare and desirable model that represents a famous artist. The original Slash Snakepit guitar would be one example. But those guitars are an exception, not the rule.

Older guitars from the 60's and 70's don't really depreciate.
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#8
Here's where I'd be with this... 

The '67 330 likely has some significant value at this point. Most are selling in the $3K range.
On the downside, if you're not happy with P90's, you don't want the 330. If you're not happy with feedback in a high-volume amp situation, you don't want the 330. If you're not happy with a guitar with a neck that connects to the body at the 16th fret rather than the 19th fret (IOW, more frets are buried in the body compared to a 335), you don't want the 330.  Some models of the ES-330 (the "L" series) have the same neck heel as the 335, but early versions, lacking the center block of the 335, "folded" the guitar. Oops. 

Selling the 330 makes sense in any of the above scenarios. 

I don't think I'd buy a new Gibson; I'm not particularly confident in Gibson's value for the money or their current construction quality. 
If I were buying a Gibson *similar* to your guitar, I'd probably look for a really good used 345 or 355 rather than a 335 (different neck, better materials). I'm saying this and I own two 335s from '67. 

If I were buying a guitar with the same general shape, but a smaller body, I would seriously consider an Ibanez AM-205 AV. I have to confess that I have an '83 version of this guitar, and it has all the accoutrements of a 355, but a smaller size body (think 339) with ebony fretboard, MOP/abalone inlays, great neck, maple burl body. 
#9
Thanks for answers and advice. Maybe I should get a noise gate and set the tone control a bit under ten instead of selling. 
#10
If the pickups were the only thing I didn't like (see dspellman's list) I would swap them for humbucking P90s of some kind and keep the old ones in a safe place. Even if the guitar was sub-optimal in other ways, I would still think hard about trading it for something more modern, because of mojo and resale considerations, as noted by others.
#11
Tony Done Seems to be the best idea. The bridge pick up sounds amazing, it's the bridge pick up that causes the problem. Maybe I should switch that to a p 90 -sized humbucker.
#12
Renfield74 

That's what I would do. The choice needs some thought though, because my impression is that if you use a stacked P90-sized humbucker, such as a P100 (which I happen to like very much) the big flat coils will still cause rf noise problems. However, since you want a warmer tone, metal covers could fix that without sacrificing the kind of sound you want.
Last edited by Tony Done at May 17, 2017,
#13
Custom winders are your friends. The Creamery, Vintage Vibe, Rio Grande and others should be able to deliver the tone you want in the form you need.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#16
Quote by Renfield74
Does changing pick ups lower the value? 

Anything that causes the guitar to deviate from it's factory original condition will devalue it.

Putting the stock pickups back in the guitar when you come to sell it will keep the loss of value to a minimum though.
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#18
guess i have a somewhat different view. if you're not thrilled with your current guitar then sell it and buy one you are thrilled with. as for the value that may be a catch-22 these days. right now it has a fair bit of value but in a few years that  might change for the worse. keep in mind ans the boomers retire many older guitars will find their way to the used market and prices will likely drop on all but the nicest and most desirable guitars. 
#19
Quote by monwobobbo
guess i have a somewhat different view. if you're not thrilled with your current guitar then sell it and buy one you are thrilled with. as for the value that may be a catch-22 these days. right now it has a fair bit of value but in a few years that  might change for the worse. keep in mind ans the boomers retire many older guitars will find their way to the used market and prices will likely drop on all but the nicest and most desirable guitars. 


I suggested the pickup winder in case the pickups were the only issue, because I have no problem with the idea of selling the vintage Gibson for @$3700+ and buying something else.

I just wouldn't buy a newer Gibson with that money.

Instead, I'd take that and- if an LPclone is what is desired- I'd start looking at Crimson, FGN, Ruokangas, Heritage, Bacorn and other builders.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#20
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I suggested the pickup winder in case the pickups were the only issue, because I have no problem with the idea of selling the vintage Gibson for @$3700+ and buying something else.

I just wouldn't buy a newer Gibson with that money.

Instead, I'd take that and- if an LPclone is what is desired- I'd start looking at Crimson, FGN, Ruokangas, Heritage, Bacorn and other builders.

yeah i got that.  a 67 isn't even all that old Gibson wise and i'm not so sure that that is a very desirable year or guitar model for that matter.  not familiar with most of the brands you mentioned but Heritage is certainly good. 
#22
Renfield74 Yep bad idea.  Keep the classic, take care of it.  Fix it and care for it.  Don't ever let it go.  I gave away antique guitars.  They didn't carry it around like I did.  Felt sad.  I felt like I needed to go take that damn guitar back cause I loved it.  Don't ever let one of your instruments be adopted by someone who doesn't love and respect it like you did.  *peace*
#23
In my mind, that's a big check that you are refusing to cash for sentimental reasons. I'm not one of those people that goes in for the whole "vintage" mojo. If the guitar works for you, great, but otherwise you are just sitting on a pile of money better spent elsewhere.

For what that guitar would sell for, I'd bet you could get a fantastic guitar on the used market that is EXACTLY what you want.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#24
Keep the '67 save up your money and buy another.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
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#25
If the problem with the P90s are that they're shrill, hit it with a Greasebucket mod a-la telecasters and see what you think. Less than a dollar on a resistor could be the trick.
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#26
If it were mine, I would keep the 67 330 as a collector/studio guitar and get an Epi Sheraton as a gig axe.  I am continually impressed with the Sheraton and if it got lost, stolen, or damaged, it is easily replaced.  If you just don't care for the 330, sell it and bank the loot.

I have several guitars from the 50s-60s and none are my favorites these days.  They do still have mojo and are a piece of my history.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#27
Thanks everyone for insightful answers! Then I keep it and will never let it go. So is there any great dog eared humbucker in P 90 format with a warm sound for the bridge that you can recommend? 
#28
Quote by Renfield74
Thanks everyone for insightful answers! Then I keep it and will never let it go. So is there any great dog eared humbucker in P 90 format with a warm sound for the bridge that you can recommend? 

Modifying a vintage 60s guitar ALWAYS makes it less valuable to a collector.  Vintage as-delivered holds the best value.

If you want to warm up the bridge PU, just roll off the tone a bit to taste.  Bridge P90s were designed with a little bite in them but you can tame that bite easily with the bridge tone knob.  Robben Ford, Clapton, Tony Iommi, and Pete Townsend all used the bridge P90 PU a lot but just rolled off the tone to find that sweet spot.  It is there for sure.  I usually have my P90 bridge PU tone between 6-8 depending on what I am going for.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at May 19, 2017,