#1
What can you expect from a lightweight mahogany guitar like a Parker Fly or an Ibanez S series? These are guitars are super light like around 4-7 lbs.

I
#2
Well, the Ibanez, being an Ibanez, will have stock pickups that are complete wank.
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#3
My Ibanez s is a fine guitar. The pickups leave a little to be desired but it's nice to stand with for a long while, and the thinner body is a welcome change sometimes. I've had mine 10ish years and it's been durable and in my opinion long lived for what I paid.

The only real complaint is there are certain notes that at times will make the body and the springs of the zr bridge ring like hell even when packed with foam. I don't know if it is body material, thickness, or poor design, but it will drive you mad sometimes.
#4
Tone is nearly all (some would say entirely) in the pickups, not the timber. My choice is to get the guitar I like for looks, weight, feel etc, and swap the pickups if I don't like them. But in order to do this, you have to be able to define what, if anything, i wrong with the originals.
#6
jedigovnaUG 

Tone wood effects generate a lot of unresolved debate in every forum I've looked at.

I've had the same experience, but the guitars in question have been very different in other ways (semihollow v solid), so I couldn't put it down to a tone wood effect. I would consider tone wood, but it would be well down my list of priorities, as listed, it would more about necks than bodies, and I wouldn't worry at all if I didn't play squeaky clean. The amp would be by far the main consideration, followed by the FX, then the pickups
#7
jedigovnaUG I wouldn't let the woods leading to a different tonal effect be of any serious consideration. The difference it makes is so minimal that other variables that play a far bigger role completely drown it out. That and because the density of wood is inconsistent in nature, any consensus that a certain wood has a particular tone may be totally inaccurate. You may have a piece of mahogany that is extremely dense and tightly grained that may have the tonal acoustic effects more akin to maple than mahogany. So attributing a species of wood to a certain tone grossly oversimplifies the reality of what is actually going on to the point of just being plain wrong a lot of the time.

There is also something else that you need to remember. Electric guitars were originally invented because the guitars that predated them resonated too much when amplified. The bodies of guitars were made to be solid to take the acoustic resonance out of the guitar. Which consequently takes the vast, vast majority of the tonal effect of wood out along with it.

It is far more likely that the tonal differences you heard are down to how the guitar was constructed and the way it was set up. Not the woods.

I own guitars which have identical pickups too and indeed they do sound different. But that's because the two guitars are constructed very differently.
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#8
T00DEEPBLUE More than anything I was curious how a really lightweight guitar would sound in  comparison to a normal sized guitar.  By normal I just mean one that isn't extremely thin or light. I'm not really that interested in the wood type as much as I am about the actual weight..and how lighter guitars effect the tone.

I tried an Ibanez S series guitar a little while back, and I may be wrong, but it sounded extremely thin to my ear, even with the Dimarzio's that were in it. 
#9
Quote by jedigovnaUG
T00DEEPBLUE More than anything I was curious how a really lightweight guitar would sound in  comparison to a normal sized guitar.  By normal I just mean one that isn't extremely thin or light. I'm not really that interested in the wood type as much as I am about the actual weight..and how lighter guitars effect the tone.

I tried an Ibanez S series guitar a little while back, and I may be wrong, but it sounded extremely thin to my ear, even with the Dimarzio's that were in it. 

In terms of the acoustic tone? All things being identical except for the size of the body making the guitar lighter, the smaller guitar will likely be acoustically quieter and have a bit less sustain. But tonally it'll sound almost exactly the same, practically speaking.

Amplified? You might get a bit less sustain, but that's about it.
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#10
Adrian Belew's tone was not negatively affected when he switched from Strats to Parker Flys almost exclusively.
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#11
If you have the exact same pickups in say a light ibanez a and a heavier rg the. The s will be thinner. But you can fix this pretty easily by using different pickups in the s. Not all s guitars are light though. I've played some Paul wagoner sigs that were rocks
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#12
Quote by jedigovnaUG
What can you expect from a lightweight mahogany guitar like a Parker Fly or an Ibanez S series? These are guitars are super light like around 4-7 lbs.

I


It was never so much the mahogany as it was the small, dense body that made the difference in guitars like the LP, the Yamaha SG2000, the Ibanez AR300 of the late '70's, early '80's.  With much lighter bodies, you'll find these guitars have a different sound from heavier, denser guitars natively. Once run through the gamut of electronics, a lot of them will sound very similar. 
#13
My Dean Split Tail is all mohogany both the neck and body it sounds great but that is because it has a hand wound Duncan JB in it and absolutely nothing to do with the mahogany.
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#14
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Adrian Belew's tone was not negatively affected when he switched from Strats to Parker Flys almost exclusively.

I agree. He lost nothing going to his Parkers. I love light guitars too, and they can sound massive. 
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