#1
We have just had a thread that wandered off into bagpipes, lord help us, but it made me appreciate how much pleasure I get from YouTube and the gems I find there while surfing. I'm hoping other will contribute vids that are off-the-beaten track.

Here's a starter. I don't know how well-known Lonnie Donegan is in the US, but he was a skiffle player and a major force behind the 60s Brit pop scene and the British Invasion. His influence cannot be overstated. He is best remembered for songs like "My old man's a dustman" and "Does your chewing gum lose its falvour on the bedpost overnight?" However, his tastes were eclectic, and I recently came across these two, which I think are fantastic, as I am a fan of both Cyril Tawney and negro work songs:





Que mas?
Last edited by Tony Done at May 18, 2017,
#2
Quote by Tony Done
...[ ].....Here's a starter. I don't know how well-known Lonnie Donegan is in the US, but he was a skiffle player and a major force behind the 60s Brit pop scene and the British Invasion. His influence cannot be overstated. He is best remembered for songs like "My old man's a dustman" and "Does your chewing gum lose its falvour on the bedpost overnight?"
"Chewing Gum", was a huge hit here in the US, but I would swear it was a "Homer & Jethro" cover, not Mr. Donnegan's original. (Although, I couldn't find any proof of that at YouTube).

Satire and humor were quite prevalent in the music of the 50's and 60's. So here's the Chad Mitchell Trio, recounting the story of the murderous Elizabeth Borden, from Falls River, Massachusetts .

Here's H & J, with a satirized version of, "How Much is That Doggie in the Window", sung by Patti Page"..


Quote by Tony Done
...[ ]...as I am a fan of both Cyril Tawney and negro work songs:
Negroes worked? Negroes sang? When was that?

"The Strawbs" were a band which perhaps was a part of the "British Invasion", but were sadly underappreciated. Since we're on satire, here they skewer Britain's labor problems of the time:


Here Davids Cousins writes of his woes with heroine addiction, under the guise of Homer's "Iliad & Odyssey". (Give away lyric, "
Enticing Heroine, so calm.....Took Hero firmly by the arm......Told him that she meant no harm"),

With the heavy use of Mellotron, and tons of bombast, you can hear seminal elements of symphonic metal begin to emerge:

Two brothers in Ireland, were separated at birth. One was raised Catholic, the other Protestant. What happened then?


(I think this is old enough to that being Rick Wakeman on the organ. Not sure though).

"The Strawbs" energed from the "Strawberry Hill Gang" in what, I suppose we should call, "British Folk". Here they are with the dearly beloved Sandy Denny, (She later of "Fairport Convention").

Hint: Should anyone enjoy this singer, there is a treasure trove of her material on YouTube.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 18, 2017,
#3
The negroes worked and sang when they were in prison camps.

I don't know much about the Strawbs at all, which is a bit surprising considering when they started. I was more interested back then (still am really) in more traditional Brit folk styles, though I did like Steeleye Span and Pentangle, who came bit later The Irish Troubles were at their height in my musically-formative years, and I still play "The patriot game."
#5
Garthman Like far out dude, pass the joint..

You should bookmark that video, for when the next person whimpering about neck width starts a thread....
#7
From the same time period, the Strawbs again. Here Catholic mass meets the Tibetan, "Book of the Dead". This particular video overlays contemporary issues and photojournalism with the 1970's hymn of tolerance and redemption:



BTW, the "Lead guitar", is a mountain dulcimer pushed through a distortion booster. Bless that too.

Here's the chord chart and lyrics: https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/s/strawbs/benedictus_crd.htm
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 19, 2017,
#9
Quote by Tony Done
Not wild about the song,...[ ]...
Given that the song is quite lavish, melodic,more than one person plays an instrument, and wasn't born on the inner wall of a boxcar, I pretty much accepted that as a given, before I ever hit the post button...
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 19, 2017,
#12
Warning: Symphonic Metal fronted by Opera Singer, Listener Discretion is Advised..!



To make a long story short, Xandria sucks live. They don't have the backing crew the way "Nightwish" does.
Symphonic metal is always on the edge of being overblown, "too bombastic, if you will.

Here, they manage to toe the line, and come up with something truly majestic. This is a tribute to the singer, Manuella Kraller, done by splicing live concert footage, with the studio soundtrack. The sync is virtually dead on, and we get to hear the song and the band live up to its potential, along with this beautiful singer's live presence...

The theme of the song is, "nothing lasts forever", albeit a vastly more intense take on the topic than Mr.Harrison's, "All Things Must Pass". Oh well, enjoy it if you're able.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 20, 2017,
#13
Since we've had some "head music" added to the thread, I thought I'd include the song which brought "acid rock", to the top 40 AM charts. (Along with the Phrygian dominant scale).

Herewith, the "Jefferson Starship", is brought out of mothballs for a PBS special in 2012. A new, way more contemporary communication system is installed, (by the name of Kathy Richardson), and the Starship launches again.

Ms. Richardson's delivery is somewhat unorthodox, (at least by modern standards), but she manages to incorporate some of the flavor of Janis Joplin's drunken stage delivery, along with the more "staid" elements of the "Airplane".

Whether it's attributable to today's much more advanced recording equipment, or a lack of illicit substances in her system, Ms, Richardson delivers this 60's anthem, more powerfully than Grace Slick was ever able to accomplish. (IMHO, of course). Her performance is so refined, (at least as far as these old ears are able to determine), she's even singing on key!



EDIT: Just because Maurice Ravel likely turned over in his grave when this version of his "Bolero" was released, is no reason we the living, can't enjoy it.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 20, 2017,
#16
I know more than likely, everybody here Is sick to death of, "Stairway to Heaven". However, the Kennedy Center, Ann & Nancy Wilson, a Gospel choir, and a guitar player who looks like "Sheldon'", (the character from, "The Big Bang Theory"), all conspire to reinforce and reinvigorate Zeppelin's magnum opus. "Sheldon", hits Jimmy Page's outro solo note for note, with not a hair on his head longer than an inch or so. Even Yo Yo Ma, the classical cellist, grooves in the audience with casual abandon.

Things to look for, the gospel choir, an SG-1275 Gibson double necker, and the reactions of the three living members of "Led Zeppelin" as this massive tribute to their biggest hit, plays out:



(And before I forget, Ann Wilson proves with great ease and aplomb, that even the prodigiously slimming effect of all black clothing, is no match for her current girth....)
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 21, 2017,
#17
Tony Done I have to admit I hadn't heard of him until a couple months ago.  I was searching for Appalachian folk music and came across a documentary about folk music in general that featured a couple of his songs.  He quickly became one of my favorite musicians and I went on a search to purchase some of his music only to find that the last run was in the 90's and used copies of his most recent release sell for around $180.00!!!  So I ripped what I could find from youtube and now I just have to wait for a re-release.

Now for a video in a slightly different direction

Not taking any online orders.
#18
Nobody seems to have heard of this band except me Shame - one of my favourites.

Last edited by Garthman at May 21, 2017,
#19
Who knew she could sing, right? Jennifer Beals of "Flashdance" fame shows us her Hungarian (?) musical side with this track from "Blood and Concrete". (*)



Some fun facts, she graduated from Yale, studies a martial art, and is a triathlete. One could argue that she's that "one girl in a million", of which she sings. It's a dodgy call whether she would be the perfect spouse, or it would be a huge pain in the ass, simply trying to keep up with her.

(*) Here's the lyrics and chord chart: https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/j/jennifer_beals/one_girl_in_a_million_crd.htm
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 21, 2017,
#20
CorduroyEW 

Two left handers, which reminds of a an incident in Colombia, a  display of real Colombian macho (though it also applies to the women). We had a big office party, for which we hired a group, a vocalist and two guitarists singing traditional songs. One of the guitarists was left handed, and during their break I enquired about his guitar. "Would you like to try it senor?" he asked. I declined, because I can't play left handed. "No problema" says he, and proceeds to switch all the strings around to right-handed, in about two minutes. I made a complete hash of playing it, because the little guy in the business suit with the neat moustache had me completely psyched out by this time. He then played the rest of his gig with it right-handed just as well as he had played left-handed - and he managed not to have a smug grin. I swear he just played left-handed to make the trio look neat.
#21
Given to the fact that whiskey and cigarette voiced baritones are not my favorite vocalists, I give you the soothing contralto (*) voice of Susanne Scherer, covering Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah":



Side note, that nasty old all laminated Ibanez AEL-10 sounds pretty damned good when you plug the sucker in, doesn't it?

(*) She's likely better described as a mezzo, she just doesn't push an whole lot of high end into this track.

Plus, the young lady is extremely easy on the eyes.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 22, 2017,
#22
Who is/are MoonSun?

 Anyway the lady reminded of Anoushka, so I found this, a bit unusual, because it is flamenco:



That flicking backwards on the picking fingers is something I'm trying on guitar, and getting there slowly.

You likely know that Ravi Shankar had three children by three different wives, the two girls being Anoushka and Nora Jones. The son was apparently talented but didn't achieve their fame and died fairly young. Good genes.
#23
Quote by Tony Done
Who is/are MoonSun?
...[ ]....Anyway the lady reminded of Anoushka, so I found this, a bit unusual, because it is flamenco:

The video is darn good stuff, but considering her native sense of timing and melody, (not to mention the drones on that gorgeous sitar), come off as being more Byzantine than Spanish.

Quote by Tony Done
That flicking backwards on the picking fingers is something I'm trying on guitar, and getting there slowly.
That move is in flamenco. I think they literally call it, "El Ventilador", ("the fan". Every time I try that, somehow I get tangled up in percussive moves, and it all falls apart. (I make a note to my self, 'you suck at this, you're going to break your guitar"). Although I do use that fanning move once in a while on "White Rabbit", if there isn't a pick handy..

Quote by Tony Done
You likely know that Ravi Shankar had three children by three different wives, the two girls being Anoushka and Nora Jones. The son was apparently talented but didn't achieve their fame and died fairly young. Good genes.
Actually, I didn't. And I certainly would have never guessed that "Snore-a Jones" was his progeny. (I do think I recall seeing Ravi & Anoushka trading licks on time, as it were).

"Moonsun" (AFAIK), are the young lady and the guitarist. Basically they're internet "wannabes", (I honestly don't mean that disrespectfully), trying to sell their music from their own site, as opposed to getting a record deal.

I ran into them doing a search for, "Memory" (from "Cats"). She has a fascination for Tarja Turunen, (*) the former front woman of, "Nightwish". She covers their huge hit, "Nemo". Since Nightwish is symphonic metal, ironically her cover could be called, "acoustic symphonic metal". That's not quite as far fetched as it sounds, as a lot of the symphonic metal kits are putting acoustic and/or instrumental 2nd discs in their releases. I suppose it is an attempt to show the lighter, very melodic side of their material. (It takes the, "our opera front woman is better than your opera front woman, out of the discussion as well).

(*) You've already heard Tarja in the "bagpipe thread", singing "Over the Hills and Far Away".
#24
Tony Done Ponder this for a while, the Celts, "world music" and "melodic metal" all meet:



In about 1970 , I went to Jethro Tull for their tour in support of "Aqualung". Mr Anderson said as he introduced, "Wind Up", "here's an ancient Lancashire folk ballad I just wrote this week".

Here's '"an Ancient Celtic battle hymn" which was written er, 'recently'. I have some good news, and I have some bad news. The good news is, it has a nice bouncy Celtic influence, plus gobs and gobs of triplets. The bad news is, it's metal. Consider yourself forewarned....

Last edited by Captaincranky at May 23, 2017,
#25
Well, I'd rather have them than some other modern genres. That second one is a bit anachronistic and daft, unless it was written by some Scot about Brexit. I had to look up "Ten". They seem to have/have had enough member to make a concert orchestra.

I think of a lot of pop music as folk, and the electric guitar as primarily a folk instrument.

EDIT. I'd rather face "Ten" on the battlefield than this lot.

Last edited by Tony Done at May 26, 2017,
#26
OK first, this is a "daighsoe" : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dg%C4%A7ajsa


"Phonetic Gaelic", is sort of a oddball language to use, since there are so many letters in it which go unused in most of its words

Quote by Tony Done
Well, I'd rather have them than some other modern genres.
Well, "metal" has embraced world and symphonic music to the point where I actually "get it", and enjoy it! This is coming from someone who can't abide "heavy metal". In fact, I bailed altogether on rock with the advent of acts like "Van Halen", "Metallica" "Kiss", and their evil spawn. I headed straight for country. But let's face it, "The Eagles" and Jackson Browne were nothing if not "closet country" anyway

Quote by Tony Done
That second one is a bit anachronistic and daft, unless it was written by some Scot about Brexit. I had to look up "Ten". They seem to have/have had enough member to make a concert orchestra.
Modern metal is made up of "micro genres". "Beauty and the beast" (male singer growls, female is a mezzo), and others embrace world music, (along with B & B). So, if you want a whole lot of world music material, it's coming to you on a wave of Marshalls on "11".


Quote by Tony Done
EDIT. I'd rather face "Ten" on the battlefield than this lot.
Well this thread has come full circle, with the bagpipes in your last post. In all honesty, I never thought I'd hear myself say this, "I sorely missed those pipes one they stopped playing". There's definitely something missing when all you have for instrumentation is 4 looney tunes playing 55 gallon drums with pig skin stretched across the top.

In any event, there is a branch of metal which embraces almost exclusively military themes. For want of something better, I'm going to call it "martial metal".

"Sabaton", is one of the chief practitioners. Again I must warn you "Listen at Your Own Risk":



(And they go on like that, album after album)!

So now I'm sitting here thinking, "how can I make that post up to Tony"? Wait, I've got it! Here's



OK, that's a rare occasion when the let the girls sing. Check out the instrumentation: Some of the comments are comical as well:
"you can't walk through a wooded area these days without coming across a black/folk/viking metal band"

Hapsoro Pramudito1 year ago "hey, what do you guys do? "we're a metal band" "cool. you there in the middle, what do you play? ""bagpipes."


OK, this really is pretty darned "rootsie"

Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2017,
#27
And now you know what a "Daighsoe" is. Cyril Tawney, who wrote the song, was a submariner stationed in Malta before he became a folk singer/songwriter and radio presenter, and AFAIK, all his songs have naval references. His other famous one was the equally-gloomy "Sally free and easy".



There have been a lot of good, really heavy versions of that song, but I chose that one because I hitchhiked about 50 miles and back to see her in my first year at uni. I remember that she sang Tom Paxton's "Ramblin' Boy". Not a care in the world in those days, except how I was going to pay the rent, eat and drink beer all in the same week.

I suppose your choices are a reasonable evolution for Steeleye Span and their ilk, but a bit too much of a good thing for my tastes.



I think that Maddy Prior has just the right voice for that kind of song.
#28
Tony DoneI'm quite familiar with Steeleye. I even have a double CD of their hits, and possibly a concert DVD. For me, "Sir James the Rose", is pretty much my favorite single track. Well that, and "Long Lankin". I must have a recessive death metal gene somewhere in my DNA. I figure it's not really a good old English folk ballad, until at least one person dies...

That notwithstanding, here's a Gregorian chant to brighten your Sunday:



Not quite enough reverb though. It needs set on "kill", er I mean "massive stone walled interior". (And maybe a few monks in the chorus).

Not one to leave well enough alone, here's Xandria "Nightfall", it's even in a church. Dianne Van Geirsbergen has an operatic lilt to her voice too. Although this song, is a about the end of a world which never existed. Paradox,? You betcha!



Comments: Wolfesscythe1171 "Came for the song, stayed for the legs. Don't judge me".

EDIT: in all fairness, Steeleye brutally butchered (*) "Tim Lin". Here's Fairport w/ Sandy Denny with a much preferred reading:



(*) Like I said, "the folk song's not over until someone dies". In the case of Tam Lin, both he and Janet died at the hands of Steeleye
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2017,
#29
Legs, er, yes, song, not so much. She does have a very operatic voice, which reminded me (my mind works like a Markov Chain) of Rhiannon Giddens, a talented multi-instrumental folkie lass who was classically trained. I like this because I'm a Tom Jones fan from way back, and I also play this song as a slide piece:



It's weird that I never got interested in Fairport Convention, as they pre-date Steeleye by a couple of years. Listening to that, I can see where Steeleye got their ideas from.

I think I've put this up before in another thread, but it will stand another airing. A nice combination of primitive instruments and modern sound processing:



We, as a group, go on a lot about fancy guitars, this shows that there are other options.
#32
Garthman I feel obligated to update the old adage  old adage about it, "not being over until the fat lady sings". I'm gonna go with, "it's not over until the chubby blond plays a giant bongo".

I'm utterly astounded how precisely the brunette can roll those R's. No really, I was completely amazed by her. 
#33
Perhaps it's a bit generic but this is the youtube clip that made me fall in love with John Frusciante

Not taking any online orders.
#34
Quote by Captaincranky
Garthman I feel obligated to update the old adage  old adage about it, "not being over until the fat lady sings". I'm gonna go with, "it's not over until the chubby blond plays a giant bongo".

I'm utterly astounded how precisely the brunette can roll those R's. No really, I was completely amazed by her. 

Yep. It's called real music  
#35
Whilst surfing through other symphonic metal bands, I stumbled across this one. 

#37
gerdner
Quote by gerdner
Whilst surfing through other symphonic metal bands, I stumbled across this one. 
I've been meaning to tell you how much I enjoyed the "Ancient Bards" track. I am a sucker for epic sounding ballads in dirge time... Whoo hoo!

Not to mention the fact I want to go to one of their concerts, and see if she'll autograph a Hooters T shirt for me...
#38
Tony Done Tony, is there any chance of you starting a "YouTube Gems 2.0" thread. This thread has so many video links in it, it crashes my browser. I stuffed a video card in the machine last night, but I'm not completely sure the problem is cured. It still takes forever to load the thread..
#40
Tony Done  Well, I my case it's not my ISP. I just downloaded a copy of "Ubuntu" Linux in under 10 minutes. (1.5GB). Since this is a fiber optic connection rated at 50/50 "FIOS"..  There were some data rate fluctuations, I'm going to have to assume their server was limiting the data flow.

In my case, after I get to a point of goofing around watching YouTube videos, the browser simply black screens, and/or locks up. I've tried everything from baqging the limit on RAM (4GB Win 7 32 bit), to an add in video card with an additional 2GB of VRAM, to no avail.

This is an Intel G-41 based PC with a 2.8GBs Pentium dual core CPU. I keep thinking it should be plenty for web browsing, but I could be delusional.

Anyway, temps and PSU voltages seem spot on, so its either the thread, or the browser, or the motherboard, god only knows.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 1, 2017,