#1
https://www.dropbox.com/s/8dw0yeflzjqh9y6/Jack%20in%20the%20Box.mp3?dl=0

Let me know if you have problems with the above link^

I have this issue with every song I mix in my room (actually, ive had this problem in 3 or 4 different rooms) on my JBL LSR308s in many different listening positions.

Song will sound great on my studio monitors,, although not quite as good as a commercial mix, though still sounds good to my ears. Then, in my car, the kick drum is always way louder (in a boomey sort of way) than the rest of the song. I usually use samples for drums, but i have had this issue with many different samples.

I cn't figure out the issue - if it is a bass guitar/kick drum balance issue (they are a struggle to mix, always); or if i am doing something bad with my compression/limiting in the master phase?

I cant figure out what the problem frequencies are, because it sounds fine in my room but noticeable right away in my car.

Any suggestions anybody?
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#2
It seems as though there is no bass in the center channel (making kick and bass guitar especially hard to tell if there is too much or too little bass).  Its not just my mixes- it seems like pro songs too, but they are already mixed so they sound good.
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Watterboy, I love you.

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You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

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#3
Probably just a car sub issue.  Kick drum tone sounds good on my Sony MDR7506.  The mix is pretty good but I would want even more drums.  Compare your mix with something like this one.  The drums don't overpower the guitars but they are right up front in the mix.  It's a ROCK BAND, gotta have big drums!

"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
Probably just a car sub issue.  Kick drum tone sounds good on my Sony MDR7506.  The mix is pretty good but I would want even more drums.  Compare your mix with something like this one.  The drums don't overpower the guitars but they are right up front in the mix.  It's a ROCK BAND, gotta have big drums!



I agree! But i dont know how to make EZdrummer 2 sound any better, and im struggling to hear the low end on my monitors; makes it really hard to judge the balance between the kick and snare, and how much thump i can use - i love a punchy loud kick, but I cant seem to get it right unless i use headphones, which im trying to move away from
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Watterboy, I love you.

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You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

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#5
Just use the tool that works best for your mix and always alway compare your mix with a pro reference mix that you know well.  That is how I get close to what I want... A-B the two mixes until mine sounds right.

The other option is to have another engineer handle your final mix.  Often a fresh set of ears with no attachment to any of the parts can deliver a great final for not much $$.  It just depends on your goals and how far you want these tracks to take you.  The music really sounds pretty good and it was recorded well.  If it were my stuff I would have it professionally mixed and mastered somewhere else and have a first rate product that is the best it can be.  YMMV
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
Just use the tool that works best for your mix and always alway compare your mix with a pro reference mix that you know well.  That is how I get close to what I want... A-B the two mixes until mine sounds right.

The other option is to have another engineer handle your final mix.  Often a fresh set of ears with no attachment to any of the parts can deliver a great final for not much $$.  It just depends on your goals and how far you want these tracks to take you.  The music really sounds pretty good and it was recorded well.  If it were my stuff I would have it professionally mixed and mastered somewhere else and have a first rate product that is the best it can be.  YMMV

Thanks for the tips man - i agree that a professional could make it afuck load better, but i am trying to practice and maybe close the gap between what i can do and what they do!
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Watterboy, I love you.

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You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

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#7
So for getting programmed drums to have more balls (and that's what you need), we want to look at how you're mixing them.

I have very little EZDrummer experience (I use Addictive Drums), bit I would assume that there is a way to do this.

I recommend feeding each drum to it's own audio track (and let the overheads have a stereo track) as if you had real drums. If you can strip all the effects and EQ that EZdrummer have on them, that would be even better.

Once you have those all bussed, actually record them to disk. This way you can also free up some system resource so you don't have that VSTi sitting around like a 3rd nipple.

If you've disabled all the EQs and effects in EZDrummer, you now basically have raw tracks, that unfortunately are still kinda stale. So, we need to thicken these out.

Now mix the drums as if they were real. I'd look at ensuring that your snare and bass close to, but not actually, peaking.

Duplicate your Snare and Bass drum tracks.

Now let's go back to your duplicated snare. Remember the first time you used a compressor on a snare drum and over compressed so much that it so it had no attack, but was super fat and flat? Do that. Cut some of the top end to let the compressor act on the low end. I'd recommend to ensure that your effects path looks like this:

Gate - cut some of the tail off the hits.
EQ - Cut above 5k, scoop out about 400Hz or so (kill the box)
Compressor - Fast attack, fast release, 12:1 or bigger ratio. Threshold where it gets each hit but doesn't work more than a 1/3d reduction NO MAKEUP GAIN.
Another Compressor (1176 style works best here). Moderate fast attack, slow release. If it's an 1176 style, go all buttons in smash mode for ratio, if you can't 20:1. Make up so it's about 75% or so of the main snare track, but you'll want to mix it in slowly. There'll be a point where the snare starts to become massive. Too much and it becomes much weaker.

Once you have this set, put a post-fx aux send on that snare to a plate reverb at 100% wet. You'll want a moderately fast plate sound. Slowly add that in as well until it's just past the noticeable level when soloed with the drums only. Some light compression may be needed, most likely not. Roll off below 180, roll off above 7k.

That second bass track is going to be uncompressed but EQd like a maniac. Take an EQ, roll off below 50, roll off above 15k. SCOOP THE LIVING SHIT out of the 700 range, fairly fat Q and drop it like panties, -12 dB should do it. Once again, bring it up slowly with your main bass. You want it to be just noticeable in a soloed drum buss.

On your main drum buss, you only want some light EQ (slight (1dB and a fairly narrow Q) boosts at 1, 5, and 10k, and a roll off at about 50hz) to keep the rumble at bay and to add some bite to the top end.

Compression is real fun here. If you have an EQ with a wet-dry mix, this works even better.

That compressor, you'll want a moderate attack (3-5ms) and a 1-3ms release. Your ratio should sit around 2:1 to 3:1 ratio. The compressor's mix should be set to 60% dry / 40% wet. Leave your make-up to where it is. Now start dropping your threshold. You should start hearing your drums become punchier. If you take this too far the cymbal swell after the snare and bass hits will become really noticeable. If you hit that stage, go back a bit.. you want to be just on the verge of this effect.

Now make a 2nd drum buss and slap a 100% reverb on this. Determine your best settings here (as it depends on the vibe you want) and compress it. EQ out the bottom end and top end like you did to the main drum buss) and bring it up until it sounds right.

If you find the duplicated drum tracks are too much after doing them, mute them and see how the drums sound without them. This sometimes just won't work.

Some instrument specific thoughts:

Snare. If you have a harmonic enhancer, do this after compression but before EQ :


This will add a tonne of snap and punch to the snare. I use this on real snares as well, as per:

https://soundcloud.com/blockroom-recordings/snare-with-overheads-processed/s-J8uik - Snare and overheads

https://soundcloud.com/blockroom-recordings/processed-snare-in-the-mix/s-WqmHT - Snare in mix

That sound above was mixed to have a snappier, but less bodied, snare. If you need to liven up the snare (as most VSTs are kinda bland), rerecord the unprocessed snare into a new track but when you do, put a mono summed overhead feed into it as well (adjust the level to be more like overhead bleed). This will add some of the livelyness that snare tracks have with cymbal bleed.

Bass drum: Same as above. Add some overhead if you find it's too flat before processing.

Overheads. I like to rerecord these with the bass and snare in them. I'll roll the bass off above 4k and below 150 or so to give it that dull impact. Snare is roughly the same. Experiment with this.

Toms: Process them with just gates and EQs. scoop out the middle of each tom as needed, add a bit of snap at 1k or so, and then gate them as needed.
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#8
I also think your bass guitar is a bit too clean. Should try dirtying it up a bit.
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#9
I think it sounds pretty good, but as others have said it's very lacking in bass. I'd raise the bass level and be a bit less dramatic with the frequency cutting. 
In terms of drums, I'd give the kick and snare a bit of extra compression and boost the overheads a bit. 
On the subject of guitars (I'm running out of ways to start sentences ), I'd reduce the gate a bit so give them a bit more breathing room.

I've sent you a message (which probably won't work being UG), cause I might be able to help with EZdrummering