#1
Recently I just experienced a very noticeable electric shock from my electric guitar,  my rig before was a laptop, presonus audiobox and the electric guitar and I only get unnoticeable electric shocks from the string and the bridge. but when I changed to a desktop (because my laptop got damaged as you can read from my previous thread), the electric shock was much stronger.


1) What are some safety precautions you can recommend to avoid electric shocks (from the rig stated above)?
2) I also noticed a longer latency on my Presonus Audiobox ITwo while using the desktop which I don't understand because, it had higher RAM 8GB compared to my previous laptop which is 4GB?

3) I also noticed a small spark when I plug the AVR to the outlet when using the desktop/laptop, but when I used the laptop It didn't cause electric shocks that much, would the outlet have been the cause that damaged my laptop? I thought AVRs are supposed to prevent those things to happen?
When I plugged the AVR to the another outlet (but the same source), it didn't spark, and I wouldn't experience electric shock (or at least a bearable shock)?

4) Now I plan to buy a Vox Mini3 G2 amp instead? Will switching to an amp specifically the Vox Mini3 G2, avoid the electric shocks, and lower the latency? (i won't be using the Presonus Audiobox ITwo anymore when using the amp)
5) What are some safety measures to avoid the amp from getting damaged and from easily wearing off? 
#2
It varies a lot depending on where you live, what voltage etc.  Electrical issues in the USA are very different than Peru, Australia etc.  A poorly wired wall outlet can damage a laptop, desktop, amp, and even burn your house down.  Get it checked out.

A few basics:

-Make sure your rig has a 3 prong cord in good condition.
-Make sure the wall outlet is grounded and polarity is correct. (there are simple test tools to check this)
-Make sure your rig has a good chassis ground that is connected to the cord. 
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at May 18, 2017,
#3
At no point should your guitar or amp be shocking you, that's a complete safety hazard. It could be a grounding issue with the guitar, but if you are saying that you are having problems with the wall outlet and your laptop it may be time to get an electrician to have a look at the wiring in your house and at that outlet. Possibly there is a disconnected ground connection somewhere and its causing your guitar to pickup excess current, as your guitar is wanting to become the new ground.

Try using another outlet and see if the problem persists by running an extension cable, you should completely stop using the outlet you're using now until it's fixed as it sounds very dangerous.
#7
Consult a professional before you burn your house down or electrocute your self something it seems is not right with your power source.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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Time for primal concrete sledge

#8
1. Do not plug your guitar directly into the wall. 
2. Reread #1.

I try to prevent surges of electricity. That can damage your gear. Plugging everything into a power strip (or the like) and then plugging THAT into the wall while everything is on will produce a surge. While your power strip may have been billed as a "surge protector," about all it will do is burn out a fuse or pop a breaker as (or after) the surge has actually happened. For a long time I've used a Carvin AC120, a power conditioner that will bring everything plugged into it online sequentially, with a programmable delay between each item. 

You're going to want to check the grounding on the various pieces of gear you're plugging into the wall; some of us have had full-bore 60 cycle electrocution going on when we've held the guitar strings and touched a lip to a microphone. Or when we've reached across to our bass player to stop him from noodling in a practice where he needs to pay attention, etc. THAT will get your attention. Having gear that's wired *correctly* and that has grounding plugs/connectors. It's one of the reasons I *really* like wireless. 
#11
dspellman  1. Do not plug your guitar directly into the wall.  

What does that mean? Sorry I'm totally noob. What should the correct set-up be?

This is my set-up: 
Outlet from wall <--- AVR <--- Laptop/Desktop <--- Presonus ITwo <--- Electric Guitar

1) How should the correct set-up look like?


2) When I'll switch to just an Amp (and not use a desktop/laptop and Presonus Itwo), How should my set-up look like?
#12
Quote by iampeterparkerjr
dspellman can you please recommend a good wireless transmitter?

"Good" is the operative word, here. A reasonably professional unit would be something in the Line 6 G30 to G50 range (and the equivalent Shure digital ), etc. 
Lectrasonics are top tier, some Sennheisers are good, the others are variable. 
#13
Quote by iampeterparkerjr
What does that mean? Sorry I'm totally noob. What should the correct set-up be?

This is my set-up: 
Outlet from wall <--- AVR <--- Laptop/Desktop <--- Presonus ITwo <--- Electric Guitar

1) How should the correct set-up look like?


2) When I'll switch to just an Amp (and not use a desktop/laptop and Presonus Itwo), How should my set-up look like?

That was a bit of a joke (do not plug your guitar into the wall). 

Grounding your gear is probably the most important thing -- you want the easiest path for electricity to flow to NOT be through your body. 
#14
dspellman can I ask, doesn't the electric guitar has ground too? like from the audiojack to the tremolo bridge, so why do people still get electric shocks?
#15
Vintage amps with a 2 prong cord can cause shocks if the ground switch is flipped the wrong direction but modern equipment should never shock you.  You are probably experiencing a wiring problem with your house.  If any of the plugs in your house have flipped neutral and hot then that will be causing the shock.  1st thing I'd do is take your rig to a friend or neighbor's house and see if it still shocks you.  If it does then you have faulty equipment but if it doesn't shock you when you move to another location then you need to get your homes wiring looked at before something really bad happens.
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#16
CorduroyEW the outlet next to the one that sparks doesn't spark, and i've tried plugging to it, so far i don't get those shocks from it, but i'm just curious why i don't experience the shock even though both outlets come from the same electrical wire.
#17
The socket that sparks has probably got hot and neutral flipped or there is a broken/loose wire.  If you have a friend or relative that knows how to wire a plug get them over to your house to look at it as soon as you can.  If they can't fix it or you don't know anybody that might be able to do it hire an electrician.  Until then don't use that socket.  Don't use it for a guitar, a toaster, or even a toothbrush.  Don't use it for anything. 
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#18
What is an AVR? Maybe you have your guitar plugged into the speaker output instead of the guitar input. Anyway it sounds like you need professional help with your wiring. Any shock should be a major red flag! Try taking it to a freinds house with good wiring and see if it works there. Also have your friend not have his computer plugged in to the same circuit as yours....i suspect the AVR, because, what is it?
Last edited by geo-rage at May 21, 2017,
#19
Quote by GuitarHawk99
iampeterparkerjr I'm not sure what causes sparks, but that doesn't sound normal
sparks or actually archs are caused by leaving a device that consumes a lot of electricity turned on when plugging it in. Like a laptop battery
#20
geo-rage AVR is a computer component where you plug-n your desktop to instead of directly plugging into the electric outlets. i really don't know what its actual purpose, but they say it's safer to use it. and AVR stands for Automatic Voltage Regulator.
#21
The sensible thing in order discover which item is at fault in the loop.. process of elimination..

better if you have two of each.. different outlet.. surge protector.. guitar.. guitar amp..

Most important.. use a different outlet (other than the one that cause electric spark.. obviously there is a short circuit which is extremely dangerous and may cause electric fire), different surge protector or power conditioner, another guitar if you have one, instead of the computer.. plug guitar to a guitar amp (wall outlet <- surge protector <- guitar amp <- instrument cable <- electric guitar) the guitar pedal are placed in front of guitar amp connect via instrument cable..
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#22
There are a lot of possibilities here. The first thing to do is move you rig to a known good plug. Playing around with this stuff that is shocking you is dangerous. My only thought here is that your house wiring does not have ground-fault protection. Somehow your equipment is alowed to be energised without tripping any kind of safety system. The avr should really be stopping all of that.
#23
Hey guys, so i finally switched to an amp. my follow-up question is, is it normal to hear a crackling sound when you plug-in the wire from your phone to the aux-in of the amp? like, when I plug-it in, I hear a loud crackling sound, and then when i touch the 3.5m audio jack's other end where the phone is connected or just rotate it while it's connected to the phone, i here some loud crackles, is that normal?
#24
Dude. After the description of your previous setup i dont know if it's normal or not but it is normal to hear some crackling through head phones when you first plug them in. After you plug them in it is not normal to hear crackling. Crackling during playing is a sign of dirty connections, loose connections, dc voltage on an ac speaker output( which with usually be acompanied by a huge rise is volume)
Last edited by geo-rage at May 26, 2017,
#25
geo-rage i'm not using headphone at least for now. i only connected my android phone for mp3 accompaniments. it doesn't crackle when i put my android phone down or when kept steady, while connected to the amp. but when i pick it up or touch somewhere near the jack where it's connected to the phone,that's when it produces the loud crackling sounds.
#26
by the way, is what i'm doing (connecting my android phone to the amp) safe? will it not damage the amp?

the amp's manual says i can connect cd player or mp3 player to the aux-in but it doesn't specify android phone.
#28
Quote by iampeterparkerjr
by the way, is what i'm doing (connecting my android phone to the amp) safe? will it not damage the amp?

the amp's manual says i can connect cd player or mp3 player to the aux-in but it doesn't specify android phone.

Yeah, it is safe to connect your phone to the aux on the amp.
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#29
Quote by iampeterparkerjr
Hey guys, so i finally switched to an amp. my follow-up question is, is it normal to hear a crackling sound when you plug-in the wire from your phone to the aux-in of the amp? like, when I plug-it in, I hear a loud crackling sound, and then when i touch the 3.5m audio jack's other end where the phone is connected or just rotate it while it's connected to the phone, i here some loud crackles, is that normal?

That is relatively normal.  Most amps will crackle under these conditions.  If you have your phone plugged in and you hear crackling when you move the phone around then there is a small issue but it's not going to damaging anything.  It could be dirty contacts like someone else already suggested or it could just be a bad cable.
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#30
Just fyi. It is safe to plug an android or a cd player, mp3 player, tape player.... into the aux in. If you plug any of those things into the guitar input, just have the volume at zero volume when you turn the amp on. Volume 1 is usually very loud through the guitar input, but, aux in is designed for devices