#1
So in a couple of weeks at max i will get my Epiphone Les Paul Standard(and maybe i will get more money for the Plus Top Pro) and i thought i had everything from picks to Rocksmith in my casket bot then i saw a few videos where ppl say that i need to have a lot of those fancy oils and a few guitar cloths but i dont wanna oul my guitar and wash it with a dozen of cloths. In short my question is can i do just fine with 1 normal microfiber cloth and nothin else ?

Ty for answers <3
#2
The different products are to keep your instrument at its best playability, physical condition, and looks. You're ok with just a rag to clean off sweat and dirt, but it's easier if you have dedicated products. This works wonders for all that. I highly recommend it as it includes everything you need.

Think of it as a car. If it gets you from Point A to Point B it's ok. But wouldn't you rather have working ac, wipers, sun visors, and windshield that's not cracked? Why spend hundreds of dollars on a guitar only to get its bare minimum?

EDIT: I recommend getting one more extra cloth so you can have one to clean the fingerboard, one to clean the body, and another to wipe/polish it.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
Last edited by evening_crow at May 22, 2017,
#3
I just use a a bottle of GHS guitar polish (I think it's GHS, can't find the bottle - just moved) for the body and some lemon oil for the fretboard. Lemon oil works great for like ebony and rosewood fretboard (for like maple wood or anything with a finish like the body you can use the same stuff you use on the body). You can pick up a bottle of lemon oil at walmart or wherever in the section with the furniture polish. It doesn't take much at all - I bought a big bottle of it like 10 years and it's still almost full. A guitar tech recommended it and said a bottle would last me the rest of my life. Looks like he's right. Just put barely enough to coat the neck. I trickle a little line from one end to the other and use my finger to spread it out so it's coated. Use a soft bristle toothbrush (brush with the grain) to clean the gunk off, then wipe off the excess with a cloth. I recommend doing that before cleaning the body since some will probably end up on the body and you don't want to clean that twice.

Using guitar polish or gloss is mainly just to keep it looking good, but if you have rosewood or ebony fretboard you do need to oil it at least once or twice a year to keep it from drying out and cracking. I usually do it every other time I change strings. I use coated strings, so that's not super often. I just use the guitar polish every once in a while when it's looking gross.

The cloth you use doesn't matter too much as long as it's not super rough. I'd recommend using different cloths for the oil and the polish.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at May 22, 2017,
#4
Find some cheap mineral oil. Or cadge some of your grandma's Olde English "Lemon Oil" furniture polish (there's actually no lemon in it and it's nearly all mineral oil with a tiny amount of cleaning solvent). Put it in a 2 oz flip-top squeeze bottle. Use it a couple of times a year to oil your fretboard. It's mostly cosmetic, by the way. Put it on, wipe it off. Do NOT let it "soak in". It will help keep some of the sweat from penetrating the fretboard. Note that if you have a rosewood or ebony fretboard you don't really need to do this (and you shouldn't at all if you have a maple fretboard) -- they both have enough "essential oils" to last a century or two. They may look a bit dry, but failing to oil the fretboard won't make them crack or "dry out." Won't happen. But your fretboard will look prettier if you give it some attention once in a while.

Virtually all guitar coatings, whether nitrocelluose, polyurethane, acrylic or UV-set polyester, started out life as car paint. You can use something like Meguiar's Cleaner Wax (burgundy bottle, Walmart) to clean and polish it. I've routinely waxed the hardware as well (I use carnauba wax in the one-pound Johnson&Johnson yellow and red tin); it helps prevent corrosion. I use a soft towel or (if you can still find them) a cloth diaper. I've never actually purchased cloth diapers; I've just stolen them here and there (preferably not recently used).

Microfiber cloth applied to both sides of the strings (don't forget the underside) will help clean off sweat and grime. Do NOT leave that cloth in the case, draped over the guitar, and do NOT use the same grungy cloth over and over again. You'll just be accelerating the corrosion of your guitar.

I haven't purchased a commercial Dunlop 65 or Gibson product-in-tiny-bottles in forever. I don't use Doctor Whomever's Fretboard Stuff (which is guaranteed to penetrate deeper, which is something you don't want OR need). I don't use linseed oil on the fretboard (that *can* just leave you with a sticky mess that never actually dries).
#5
You don't need any of it.  I use ghs fast fret on strings because it makes the strings last significantly longer and ultimately saves me money.  I don't use any other oils or special rags.  I also keep most of my guitars stacked on top of each other in piles on the floor so take what I do with a grain of salt.
Not taking any online orders.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at May 22, 2017,
#6
No, you don't need any of them. Your guitar will work perfectly fine if you never use them.
#8
I'd argue that "need" is a relative term. Do you want to have a guitar that lasts as long as possible, and looks good for as long as possible? Then yes, use proper oils/cleaning products and cloths. The junk from your hands corrodes not only your strings but your metal hardware. It also will build up on your frets and pups. 
#9
This is a good article that might explain things since I feel there's quite a bit of misinformation in this thread. Some of the advice given here can actually harm instruments.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#10
Your fretboard doesn't really need any oil on the fretboard at all, all they do is restore a bit of the wood's natural lustre. Rosewood and ebony are already pretty oily woods in their nature, and that's the reason that woods like rosewood and ebony don't require finishes. The oils that occur in those woods naturally keep out dirt and moisture from your fingers. These oils, especially if you play the guitar somewhat regularly, hardly ever dry out. The oil from your fingers does a lot of the oiling anyway.

I do recommend that you keep the fretboard clean though, because it looks disgusting when you don't. And also it's worth buying some ultra fine sandpaper (4000+ grit) to polish the frets with every restring, and that'll remove any tarnish on the frets. It'll make the guitar play better, and it looks a lot better too.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#12
an ever so slightly damp t shirt is all you ever really need.

insert application as desired, but you could clean the epi with it.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#13
Quote by markomaricgameogre
T00DEEPBLUE so just a dry cloth trough the strings and fretboard after every practice just to remove the oils ?

That's what I do. I do love rosewood when it's all shiny and new, so I use some naptha to do a _really_ good cleaning every couple of years then some conditioning oil (Gibson stuff).
Fleet of MiJ Ibanez
Couple of Balls
Peavey & EVH Wolfgangs
Eclipse
Fender HM Strat
Kemper KPA
5150 III 50w & cabs
#14
I buy my microfiber cloths at a auto parts store, they're cheaper there, and much better quality, I usually own one for years and use it till it starts to tear and wear out. I don't really use them that much though because most of my guitars are "relics" and despite looking all shiny, they do have a lot of dents, dings, scratches, and other stuff from years of hard playing and hard use. Occasionally, I'll buff out minor scratches with stuff like 3M finish restorer just to make sure they look cared for even though most of my guitars are pretty "beat up" considering.

I do use "Guitar Honey" on the rosewood boards, and just clean the maple ones every so often with windex.
My Current Mains
- 1996 Fender Jag-Stang with EMG Pickups
- 1998 Fender Jaguar with Cool Rails
- 1982 Hondo Paul Dean II (DiMarzio Super II X2)
- 2010 "Fender" Jazzmaster (Home built)
- 2013 Squier VM Bass VI (stock)
#15
Base on personal experience, it's better to have them than not at all. The purpose of the oil is to prevent your fretboard from drying out and to also clean the fretboard from the dirt accumulated from playing it. 

I'd rather oil my fretboard myself with the natural oil I bought than bringing it to store where they charge you money for something you can easily do at home. You just need to buy a few microfiber cloths. You can reuse the cloth so you won't go through 1 cloth very quickly... Took me about a year to replace 1 cloth.

I recommend you if you're getting to it get the F-one oil as compared to Lemon Oil (Lemon Oil to me is rubbish). Furthermore, you cannot use lemon oil on maple fretboard so if you're not careful, you'll mess it up.

Also another thing that I recommend would be getting a Fret polisher (got mine from Planet Wave). Polished frets will increase your playability as the frets will not give you any resistance when you bend or do vibrato. 
Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod

Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod

1999 Japanese Epiphone Les Paul Standard LP-80 with Peter Green Mod
#17
Yeah, I know a lot of people hate Will, but after starting to see problems with rosewood and ebony fretboards with a collection that started about 10 years ago, I studied everything I could find on the internet on the topic, applied critical thinking and balanced it with my own experiences with various products, this is the best source I've found:  I don't agree with 100% of what he says--I don't think the boards need it as often as he recommends, and one treatment was all it took to bring the most neglected board back to brand-new condition, and it's stayed that way for the last 6 months without further attention.

TL;DR: Clean fretboard with Naptha as required.  Use Howard Feed'n'wax on rosewood/ebony boards once every year or two.  Gibson spray polish works great on glossy body finishes if you ever feel it's getting too dirty or you get tired of smudges.  I don't know what to recommend to clean satin finish since I use the stuff the prototype stuff the Fender factory gave me for that guitar--I guess Naptha would be fine.  Stew Mac fret erasers work great to combat fret tarnishing (I've got 1200, 4000, and 8000 and use all 3 to bring really neglected frets back like new, but 8000 should be alright for annual maintenance).  I also finish the frets with Blue Magic Metal Polish Cream and a 13/16" buffing wheel on a Dremel--but only have had to do that for guitars neglected for 5 years+.

Or you can never clean it, unload it to a pawn shop for $50 when it's unplayable in 7 years, and I'll buy it from them for $100 and have a brand new guitar after 2 hours work.
Last edited by SpeedSterHR at May 26, 2017,
#18
I don't use any of that stuff any more. if you have a guitar with thick layers of grime all over the fingerboard and all that, it does help to take it right off way easier than without. But in my experience, after doing it once I only need to wipe everything down between string changes to keep everything nice. I use a microfiber cloth on the body (sometimes I'll spray a 10:1 water and isopropyl alcohol solution with like a drop of soap if it's grimy) and on the neck I just scrub aggressively with a dry clean washcloth. Does the trick for me if I do it regularly. 

Sometimes though, if you live in a particular dry environment (I don't know the exact numbers, but probably under 40 or 45% humidity) then using fretboard oils can be helpful so the wood doesn't dry out too much and crack.

also, didn't read what anyone else said. I'm sure other people already said a lot of similar stuff. sorry 'bout that, too lazy
#19
no. if you feel like you have to oil your guitar consistently and wipe it down all the time then just hang it up on the wall and don't touch it. i clean my fretboard only after changing strings and everything has been fine. 
#20
Quote by evening_crow
This is a good article that might explain things since I feel there's quite a bit of misinformation in this thread. Some of the advice given here can actually harm instruments.


This is not a "good article" -- it's an ad for an $8 per ounce oil in a small bottle. The author of the article admits that he doesn't know if the furniture products are bad or good for the guitar, and none of the information in this article is first hand in any way. He's simply compiled information from a bunch of other internet articles, and in the end he really doesn't know what's in the bottle of goo he's promoting, either.

A gallon of Premium 100% Pure Food Grade Mineral Oil USP, 1 Gallon, NSF Approved, Butcher Block and Cutting Board Oil on Amazon will run you $22. Eligible for free shipping and all that. That's 128 ounces. The crap the "good article" is selling is $8 an ounce. That's $1024.00 per gallon. Seriously?
#21
Quote by olix95

Sometimes though, if you live in a particular dry environment (I don't know the exact numbers, but probably under 40 or 45% humidity) then using fretboard oils can be helpful so the wood doesn't dry out too much and crack.


NO fretboard oil is helpful so that the wood doesn't dry out too much and crack. That has never been what it's for. Oil is not required to prevent that, and oiling it wouldn't prevent that in any case. Only humidification will prevent wood from drying out.
#22
Quote by CorduroyEW
You don't need any of it.  I use ghs fast fret on strings because it makes the strings last significantly longer and ultimately saves me money.  I don't use any other oils or special rags.  I also keep most of my guitars stacked on top of each other in piles on the floor so take what I do with a grain of salt.


FWIW, Fast Fret is just mineral oil. It takes bright sounding strings and dulls them down. If you're good with that, use away. But if you're going to do that, you could use ordinary mineral oil in a little pump spray bottle for less money.
#23
Quote by dspellman
FWIW, Fast Fret is just mineral oil. It takes bright sounding strings and dulls them down. If you're good with that, use away. But if you're going to do that, you could use ordinary mineral oil in a little pump spray bottle for less money.

I've got acidic skin so if I don't oil my strings each time I play then they rust overnight.  Fast fret may just be mineral oil but I like applicator.  It's convenient.  
Not taking any online orders.