#1
Hello everyone, i have bought a new guitar recently, it is an ESP LTD EX-350 with a floyd rose and emg hz's (h1 and h1a) , however i am having feedback sound issues, and its the bad kind of feedback, so i am getting feedback when i mute the strings and even when there are no strings on, touching the floyd rose or the knobs dont stop it neither
What i have tried is, 
1. I went far away from the amp
 2. turned the amp backside  (those first two have worked for the neck pickup however the feedback continues with the bridge one) 
3. I tried to reduce gain (worked after i halved the gain, but its really really low gain) and treble

What i didnt try is, i didnt try another amp, which i use a kustom kg112fx, and i didnt try to use a noise gate or pedal
I dont have much money so i have to be sure if getting a noise pedal will fix my issue at all
If it will, what do you suggest for a noise pedal?

Thank you
#2
So are you experiencing noise as in buzzing? Or actual feedback like squealing? A noise gate will help with the buzzing. What happens is the noise gate shuts off the signal from your guitar entirely when you are not playing. That will "mask" the noise. But it will not help so much with feedback, as what is happening there is the output signal from the amp is going back into itself through the pickups of the guitar.

Further, if the buzzing is really bad, I would check the grounding on your guitar. Also check your area for strong sources of EMI, like lighting, phones, etc. If you are experiencing squealing even turning down the gain may not be entirely the solution- if the amp is silly loud, even when clean, it can cause feedback.

IIRC if the pups are not mounted properly it can cause squealing as well. Since you say it is worse with the bridge pup, maybe check the housing and also the grounding. Try other guitars, try other amps, try other rooms. Also your amp could possibly be oscillating internally, to which I say- new amp time.
#3
Will Lane Its not buzzing, its like this extremely high pitch sound, and i did try to play at several spots, school, 5 different rooms.
This wasnt happening with my old ec-50 
Last edited by thedrath819 at May 24, 2017,
#4
thedrath819 Something is definitely wrong here.  It shouldn't feedback without any strings on it.  Did you purchase the guitar new or is just new to you?  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#6
You need to narrow the problem down.

Start by running guitar > cable > amp and that's it.

Swap guitars, swap cable, swap power outlets on the amp.

The fact that you get the noise without strings on the guitar is a concern.

What about just the cable into the amp without a guitar?

Change 1 thing at a time.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
If it feeds back even when you're completely dampening the strings with your hands, then your pickups have gone microphonic.  I gigged with a guitar that had a microphonic bridge pickup for years--I just had to switch to the neck pickup between songs or turn down the volume on the guitar.  It was a little cool because you could talk or sing into the pup and hear it thru the amp.  But it also pierced some eardrums at a few venues and I eventually replaced the pup, which made the bad and good aspects both go away.
#9
metalmingee man i tried all of that stuff, today i also tried a different amp and cable and the same thing happened, did not happen with a different guitar so i think @speedsterhr is correct
#10
I forgot to write this, but if its important ill write it: the feedback does temporarily stop when i pick a string, for like 1.5-2 secs
#11
Quote by thedrath819
I forgot to write this, but if its important ill write it: the feedback does temporarily stop when i pick a string, for like 1.5-2 secs

That probably means the signal from playing the guitar is momentarily overpowering the microphonic feedback.  That's what was going on with my old pup.  I also have another guitar with a pickup mounted on a metal plate (almost like a Telecaster) and with a built-in distortion effect--when the distortion is on and the volume is up all the way it's just as microphonic as the other guitar was, but when the on-board distortion is off, then there's no problem.
Quote by thedrath819
Is a microphonic pickup not fixable?

Sometimes they are.  The new Fender Shawbucker pups are pretty microphonic because they aren't potted--potting them would fix that.  I'm familiar with the guts of EMG active pups and those probably would not be fixable (but they probably wouldn't go microphonic either since they're basically potted in epoxy instead of wax).  I don't know what the inside of an EMG HZ looks like (i.e., whether it's essentially solid like the actives or not).  You can almost definitely solve your problem with a new pickup or two.  If you're on a budget, check out GFS (http://www.guitarfetish.com/)  This weekend you can get closeout humbuckers for 42% off.
#12
i dont think i can afford new pickups, its best ill give the guitar to a master so he can fix it somehow, youtube says easiest solution is wax
#14
This does sound like bad gain staging into the input of the amp. Does this happen at any volume level?
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#16
Quote by thedrath819
i dont think i can afford new pickups, its best ill give the guitar to a master so he can fix it somehow, youtube says easiest solution is wax

Did you check the link?  Their pups are like $27 and this weekend you get 42% off.  That's a fraction of the minimum fee every tech/luthier I'm familiar with charges unless they're just changing strings.

Can you please post the link to the video that said wax will fix a HZ?  It's already potted in epoxy.  I just checked what they look like inside (http://www.seymourduncan.com/forum/showthread.php?43135-EMG-without-Cover-Pics!) and maybe there's some space that isn't fully encased where wax would work, but maybe not.  Can you even get the covers off without permanently damaging them?
#17
SpeedSterHR I live in turkey though, so its gonna be expensive because of that anyway even if i wanted to, I will not wax the pickups myself, i will let a guitar master do it instead

Last edited by thedrath819 at May 27, 2017,
#19
Quote by thedrath819
SpeedSterHR I live in turkey...

OK, that changes everything.  Now I understand why you probably can't get inexpensive pickups and how hard it might be to get good ones at any price.

You probably would need the covers off the HZ pickups to pot them.  I'm not sure that can be done without damaging them.

You might be better off living with the problem and just turn down the volume knob when you're not playing until you can afford to get new pickups or even wait until you can afford a guitar that doesn't have issues.

Anyway, the pickups in those videos are very different from your HZ pickups, so what you see in those videos doesn't apply 100% to your situation.  Basically ESP already did that with your pickups but instead of wax they used epoxy.  Epoxy starts as a 2-part liquid and hardens into plastic quickly after the 2 parts are mixed.  So it's kind of like wax, but it won't melt and it's much thicker and tougher.  Also it works like glue and sticks to plastic, so if EMG put the covers on while the epoxy was wet, then they could be bonded together and impossible to separate without causing permanent damage.

If you take your guitar to a master over there there's a good chance you won't be able to play it a again without having to rewire the whole guitar.  I've had issues like that with technicians in the US (including some famous ones in Hollywood), and I have similar experience with construction and electrical work from some of the best Turkish companies.

Good luck.
#21
Quote by thedrath819
SpeedSterHR I mean if i was to practice i already turn down and play low volume because i live in an apartment, but on stage its painful


Yeah, I gigged for about 4 years with a microphonic pickup, so I feel your pain.    It was a little easier for me because only the bridge pickup was microphonic, so I could flip to the neck between songs.  But it was still my #1 gigging guitar even though I had up to 7 other guitars to choose from back then.  And I had a replacement pickup lying around for almost 6 months before bothering to switch it out--by then that guitar had become #2.

 Maybe another trick you can try is to stick an equalizer(EQ) device between the guitar and amp and bring down the frequency that's feeding back.

Also, we didn't discuss your input cable (from the guitar to the amp).  If the shielding is messed up, it can contribute.  If you're using speaker cable instead of instrument cable it can worsen problems like this too.  There are other improper cables that also have the correct plugs, but aren't the right impedence or don't have enough shielding.
#22
By the way, here's something from the Seymore Duncan site about problems you may have trying to pot EMG-type pickups:

"Wax potting epoxied pickups can be rather difficult because the thick epoxy covers the components but is usually too thick to permeate the coil and fine voids. Air pockets can still cause microphonic feedback in epoxied coils and I try to avoid this type of potting especially on passive or non active pickups. Wax potting might help if it can seep into voids left unfilled by the epoxy. Epoxied pickups are difficult to repair or rewind when broken. Earlier epoxy resins would shrink and often caused the pickup to eventually stop working."

http://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/swd-qa/how-to-eliminate-microphonic-feedback-from-your-guitar-and-bass-pickups-using-hot-wax


Looking back on it, the reason I took so long to fix my old guitar is it was kind of fun.  It made it feel like it was always on the edge of being out of control.  Kind of like driving a race car in the rain.  I have to admit, it has lost a little bit of its charm since I fixed it and I don't play it as often anymore.  

Maybe a kill switch is all you really need.  That's a lot cheaper than new pickups and easier than turning the volume down between songs.