#1
Well, I've been procrastinating on restringing my electric guitar. I'm rather experienced with the mechanical aspects of guitars in general. What I would like to know is if anyone has their own set amount of slack they give before bending the string at the tuning post.

I understand there are variables as to which style guitar you're restringing, the guitar head, which restringing technique you're using, and fretboard scale length as well (thanks internet search engine!).

A lot of people say to pinch the string at the guitar nut and slide 2 frets up or 3 inches. But, is 3 inches really enough for the low E? Seems a bit short to me and would encourage breakage with the string bending at such a sharp angle on the tuning post...

Others say to take the width of 4 fingers under the low E string, measuring at the middle of the fretboard in order to determine slack needed to wind around the tuning post properly. I have (on occasion) had great results with this technique. Then, decrease slack to the width of 3 fingers after the G string. This technique can end up highly inaccurate though, seeing as some people have different hand sizes and such.

I went through the trouble once of measuring how much slack I had used, measuring from the middle of the fretboard, decreasing the individual string slack length in constant values. (Ex. 6 inches for Low E, decreased by .5 inches = 5.5 in for A, 5 for D, 4 for G, 4 for B, 3.5 for Low E.)

As you can see, I seem to have the values in reverse as the higher strings would need more slack and the lower strings less. I measured in reverse when I did this by accident. Also, notice the variable length after beginning to string the higher strings.


Basically, I'm attempting to get restringing down to a science. Or at least slack length when restringing. I hope no one thinks I'm crazy for trying to measure something that most people seemingly acquire a knack for, usually adjusting on the fly and by simply eyeballing the amount of slack given, and also something that can have so many variables.

Any input on this matter would be appreciated! If you have done measurements of your own I'd love to hear any input you have.
Please also note your guitar style in terms of parts that would affect measurements on other guitars with different parts.
#4
I go about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2" past the post, then crimp and cut it, in that order. This should give about  2 to 2 1/2 turns on the post when the string is tuned to pitch. All my guitars are hard tail, electric, acoustic and lap steel, and I do them all the same way. The only exception is one with locking tuner. On that one I thread the string loosely into the tuner with just a bit of slack, then tighten the lock. I like to end up with about 1/2 turn on the post.
#5
Terrapin2190 Once you've done it twice, you won't need to ask the question. Never measure extra string length beginning at the nut, because 3+3 headstocks and inline headstocks will be different. If you absolutely need to measure, figure an amount *past* the tuning post for that string. Tony Done , above, figures 1 1/4 - 1 1/2" is good enough. I usually do a bit more, so that I've got at least one full turn above the hole in the post and two or three below. Locking tuners really don't need more than about a half turn on the post, but you're welcome to do more if it makes you feel secure.
#8
I'm not sure why this is even a question. Just need enough for 3-5 wraps. No reason to over think it.

Personally I just cut the string at the next tuning peg on 3+3 guitars out of habit. Haven't played my G&L or Fender lately so can't say specifics on those. Just eyeball it, its not rocket science.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#9
Quote by Terrapin2190

I hope no one thinks I'm crazy for trying to measure something that most people seemingly acquire a knack for, usually adjusting on the fly and by simply eyeballing the amount of slack given, and also something that can have so many variables.

A little bit, but don't let that stop you. Some of your assumptions are strange, and it's an odd thing to fixate on perfecting, but those aren't necessarily bad things and I'm mildly interested in where this goes. 

For Fender type headstocks I add about two posts worth of length - pull the string through the post, then grab the string at the next-to-next post and push/pull that much slack through, then wind) with a bit of slack allowed on the higher strings. Fender posts are a bit shy of an inch apart so this gets you about 1.8 inches.

I think there's just too much going on to standardize this measurement, and little value to it. Different winding techniques like crossing over-to-under, locking the string with one reversed winding, or simply tighter or looser winds, are all going to come into play. Add that to non-standard tuning post thickness and taper, string gauge, etc., and I just don't see how you could reasonably expect to find a definitive answer that applies broadly. Certainly one person with consistent technique, guitars, and strings could get reliable results but that's what we all do with a little practice anyway.
#10
Leave the distance between 1 tuning peg's length worth of string and read this.

http://www.stringthis.com/howtostringu.html

Then stretch in the strings properly.

You're looking for a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#11
I just wrap my strings then pull the extra through the hole. Bottom three I go 1 and a half to 2 wraps, top three I go about 4. Hardest part is getting them in the hole but it's consistent.

My newest guitar has some stubby locking tuners, so I leave just enough to do about a quarter to one wrap on the low and about 1 wrap on the G and B and 3 On the high e since it slips a little at first. Even a quarter wrap on it has a sufficient break angle.
#12
You are thinking way too much about this.. I would go as far as to say there is no science to it at all.. wrap it around the post and tune it up
#13
I'd say as long as you have a couple of wraps around the post for the wound strings and 3 or 4 wraps for the plain strings you'll be fine.  On my Gibsons I allow twice the distance between the string posts for the plain strings and 1 1/2 time the string post spacing for the wound strings and I never have any tuning stability problems.
#14
Quote by dspellman
Once you've done it twice, you won't need to ask the question.


i still have to look up youtube vids for restringing I'm terrible at anything mechanical
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Leave the distance between 1 tuning peg's length worth of string and read this.

http://www.stringthis.com/howtostringu.html

Yep,  2" like described in that article is a good place to start.  Then you can fine tune it based on which string and how many loops seem right to you.  The important thing is to wind it properly as described in the link.
#16
Quote by Dave_Mc
i still have to look up youtube vids for restringing I'm terrible at anything mechanical


I know the feeling. I'm still using porn as instructional video.
#18
On my Teles, I usually go for cutting off the string about halfway between the next tuner along from the one it's going into and the one after that, so maybe a little under one and a half inches past the tuner? I allow a bit more for the top two strings. This gives me a little less than a full wind for the low E and A, a little more for the D and then the plain strings go from about 3 to about 5. It's rock solid and the only trouble I've ever had with it is when I've cut the high E too short. I imagine you'd get a tad more winds (this is a bad sentence grammatically but you get what I mean) with lighter string gauges, and possibly it's a little different with conventional tuners (my Teles have split-shafts), but as far as the principle goes it's about getting the number of winds to the minimum it can be without the string slipping. And while I don't generally approve of people saying their way is best, my way is best I can keep a Bigsby with a Jaguar bridge in tune.

Quote by babysmasher
You are thinking way too much about this.. I would go as far as to say there is no science to it at all.. wrap it around the post and tune it up
There's science to everything. Whether it's worth paying attention to or not? I would say a very basic understanding of the issues involved in tuning stability is useful, at least.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#20
Quote by jayme8494
you just gotta do it up like this




I'm thinking that makes pick slides interesting...
#21
I haven't forgotten about this thread. I strung up my guitar the other night and broke the High E string due to the strange and stupid way I wrapped B and E. What I did created too much tension and a sharp/breaking point. Wasted a pack of strings there unless I can buy singles lol.

The answer does seem a bit generalized, so I think there's still a science to it, albeit a strange science.

I followed a tutorial that said to leave between 1 1/2 and 2 fretboard note spaces from the nut, which ended up pretty nicely. I'm working with a Gibson/Les Paul head so that covers one variable. I'll have to measure the length and figure out specifics on what spacing my fretboard consists of and other things.

I also did 1 over 'x' under for wound strings (Plus G, which I may not do next time) and 2 over 'x' under for the bare strings.

I'll consider this a side project in my off time. The funny thing is, I 'have' a locking nut on the guitar I'm using lol! I just think it'd be neat to get one spot on reference for restringing electric (and possibly acoustic) guitars. Thanks for all the info so far!