#1
I bought a second hand damien elite, intonation was really messed up basically learned how to do a set up for the first time just to fix it, managed to fix it but I set it up to les paul specs (dunno if that's the word?) that I found on some youtube video. I adjusted the truss rod with a capo on the first fret i think I held down 19 (where neck meets body) and used a 0.25mm gauge at the 7th fret, set the bridge height so that it was 1.50mm on the 12th fret high e and 2.50mm on the low e 12th. 

But that action was too high and gross so I tried to lower it and got some dead notes when I was bending around 17 on the high e. Any advice? I've been really lost on what heights to use, I only learned all this recently. Any help appreciated thanks
Last edited by jacksonwhackson at May 25, 2017,
#2
The problem is "second hand." Most Schecters have been set up in Burbank before they leave for the brick and mortars. Once they get into the hands of users, all bets are off. If you're really having problems with the setup, take it to a GOOD tech (you will generally NOT be walking into a guitar center when this happens) and have them set it up for the way you play.

Bear in mind that a good setup starts with a set of LEVEL frets, continues with an accurately cut nut and a correctly adjusted bridge. You can check for level frets easily enough -- start with about an 18" stainless ruler's edge and lay it on the flat fretboard. Worth noting that you'll want to use that same 18" straight edge for setting your relief, as well. The whole business about using a string and capo is for rather gross "rule of thumb" measurements. There are also "fret rockers" that will help you find high and non-level frets in three-fret clusters.

1.5 mm is about 4/64ths or 1/16th", and that's pretty high for me. 4/64ths" might be where you want to set the bass E at the 12th fret, not the high E.
#3
dspellman thanks for the advice I'll look into what you were mentioning but if it ever gets to the point where I have to take it to a tech I'm just going to harvest it for it's emg's and put them on my jackson because it was only an ok deal when I bought it and spending extra on it would be too much for me. What do you have your high at when your low 12th is 4/64ths?
#4
Quote by jacksonwhackson
dspellman thanks for the advice I'll look into what you were mentioning but if it ever gets to the point where I have to take it to a tech I'm just going to harvest it for it's emg's and put them on my jackson because it was only an ok deal when I bought it and spending extra on it would be too much for me. What do you have your high at when your low 12th is 4/64ths?


3/64ths or less. In fact, my low 12th E is usually less than 4/64ths.
#5
Are you sure you needed to mess with the relief?  Schecter uses dual action truss rods on all their guitars that make their necks super stable.  I haven't had to adjust my Damien Special FR's relief since I got it 8 years ago, even after switching string gauge from factory 10s to 9s and moving across the country from an ultra humid climate to an ultra dry climate and about an 8,000 ft increase in altitude.  Your guitar should be able to be setup to be a great player unless the previous owner did something really dumb.  You can probably contact Schecter and get the original setup specs from them.  Those are great quality rock solid guitars for the money.  Don't ditch it because it's not setup properly.   
#6
I had to have the necks slightly adjusted on both of my schecters. just take it to the luthier. 
#7
I would be well worth your time to learn how to setup a guitar. Depending on where you take it, $30-50 a pop. Still an option, but knowing how to do is well-worth your time.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer