#1
Yea I really need a good pod. The wife snores out at 7pm EVERY nite and I sit on the coach staring at my Marshall TSL 100 half stack and pedal board. 
This is not cool anymore. I need something 
... that I can plug my electric directly into and can use my headphones.
... that gives you the options to create good Rock tones
... that has pre installed drum loops.
...that has a USB port so i can  play to backing tracks or my drum loops
Would be nice if it had a record function 

I had to go and sell my my Boss BR1600. It was antiquated but did the job.
Then I picked up the Zoom R24 recorder. Nice for miking cabs and recording but not so user friendly and it seems to need a preamp for decent tones If you plug strait in.
Sure wish I had the BR1600 back. (can't believe I just said that.)

So, What would you do? (No, I can't get rid of her)
Last edited by LordKhufu at May 27, 2017,
#2
I've never beem happy with built-in drums on any MFX.  I'd recommend getting a Beat Buddy for that.  And then a Zoom G5 (or the current model), a Line 6 HD-500, Helix, or Axe FX depending on your budget.  Also a Helix DAW plug-in is coming out this summer for about $400-500, if you're into playing through a DAW, but it won't have all the switches for real-time effects unless you add a MIDI foot controller, which you'd also need for the Axe FX.

Lately I've been using Beat Buddy + G5.  At home it all goes through hi-fi Yamaha 5.1 computer speakers.  For small shows I run the G5 into the Beat Buddy and then that direct into the house PA and I just run my IEMs through the Beat Buddy headphone jack.  For practice in hotel rooms I just plug a cheap blue tooth speaker's aux input right into the Beat Buddy headphone jack. 

It's been almost 3 years since my JVM 410H/4x12 has even been taken out to a gig and a lot longer than that since I've used it at home other than for recording.  I could run the JVM in silent mode into a board at home, but there's no need to go through the hassle because the MFX have been just as good long enough now.
#3
Quote by SpeedSterHR
I've never beem happy with built-in drums on any MFX.  I'd recommend getting a Beat Buddy for that.  And then a Zoom G5 (or the current model), a Line 6 HD-500, Helix, or Axe FX depending on your budget.  Also a Helix DAW plug-in is coming out this summer for about $400-500, if you're into playing through a DAW, but it won't have all the switches for real-time effects unless you add a MIDI foot controller, which you'd also need for the Axe FX.

+1
Probably your best bet, LordKhufu.

When I started playing electric guitar, I didn't have an amp, I used a Korg Px4, got another when I broke it, then one more. Got a Px5, Tascam GT-R1, and a Digitech iPB-10 after that. Like your Boss, all do those things, but are old and discontinued.

Since then, I've gotten a couple of amps, and dozens of pedals. I still use my old devices., but am considering getting a newer device that will work with those pedals.

I'm going to be buying a Quilter Mach 2, but it doesn't have a headphone jack. The Quilter 45 and 101 heads, however, do, so they're also on my radar. If you're a pedal guy like me, you might want to give them a look.
http://www.quilterlabs.com/index.php/productpage/microblock-45
http://www.quilterlabs.com/index.php/productpage/101-series
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
Quote by LordKhufu
(No, I can't get rid of her)

Well, you can. But its cool if you don't want to.

What's the budget really? I can tell you from experience that option 1 is very expensive typically.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#6
Come to think of it, if you really want to use the pedal board and half-stack you already have, maybe this is a better solution:

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TorpedoLive

There are cheaper attenuators available, but they don't seem to produce the owner satisfaction that this one does.  A quick review of it's features makes it pretty obvious why it's worth the extra $.

You'd still need a separate drum machine and an interface to record, but at least you'd be able to keep using all your pedals and amp.
#7
Step one: obtain audio interface
Step two: obtain good pair of over-ear headphones (I use senheiser HD558s)
Step three: download free VSTs such as lepou to your computer
Step four: Use in a $60 copy of reaper
Step five (optional): If your current PC setup isn't convenient, buy a cheap laptop. Single track guitar recording and playing can easily be handled by any computer sold today
#8
Zoom G3.  I run the headphone out into a microcube aux in for low volume playing.  Sounds pretty freak'n awesome.  You can even run your whole rig on batteries.
#9
Quote by fly135
Zoom G3.  I run the headphone out into a microcube aux in for low volume playing.  Sounds pretty freak'n awesome.  You can even run your whole rig on batteries.

With this approach you can just use the G3 as an amp/cab sim and run your regular pedals through it.  Maybe use it as drum machine, too, while you're at it, but it will be very limited.  If you run it thru the aux, then you don't even need the microcube (or any guitar amp).  Any good bluetooth speaker with an aux jack will give you the same result, but you could also use good powered computer speakers or a studio monitor.

If you want the most bang for the buck, you could get that same functionality (maybe a few less amp/cab sims) with a G1X for 1/3 of the price, but you'd lose the USB recording feature.

If you're trying to replace your pedalboard, then the G5 is going to be more satisfying than the G3.
#10
In addition to the above suggestions, check out some of the newer lunchbox or studio amps.  I use a Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio - 15/1 W 3 channel amp with a loop AND it's a USB interface AND you don't need a speaker load hooked up AND it has a headphone out (the built in speaker emulation isn't the best tbh).  

For my quiet use I use this IRT-Studio into my laptop with Peavey ReValver for the speaker impulse (love some Mesa V30 sounds in their Flathill) and Reaper as a DAW.  Just turn on monitoring and it's your entire rig - guitar, real amp, all your pedals, etc. but with the sound coming out of your computer.  

Or just go 100% software on your laptop.  I used Peavey ReValver for years this way and had G.A.S. so bought the Laney to use my pedals too.  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#12
Quote by gregs1020
Well, you can.  But its cool if you don't want to.

What's the budget really?  I can tell you from experience that option 1 is very expensive typically.

Yea would love to keep it under $400.Gonna sell my 1960A Cab. Sill gotta jcm2000 TSL combo around incase she pisses me off...or takes off for the day. Kinda lookin at the Line 6 HD500. Looks like I can line in some tracks to play with and then line out some decent tones into the Zoom R24 recorder.  This would be a lot easier if I could get some decent tones plugging straight into the Zoom. But No....seems to need an audio interface that is unless you want to play John Denver songs. Actually John put out some great music (never would of said that 20 years ago ) I have always been kinda partial to Blackmore and Schenker myself. Yea...I know I am old ...So What.  Thanks for the input guys :-0 mmm I get the feeling I don't need a floor model like the 500 to get what I am looking for. I call it couch recording and it is quite relaxing. I think that 500 might look a little akward sitting on the coffee table...
#13
You could look for a POD HD (Desktop, its the classic bean shape) on the used, which is essentially the same thing just without the footswitches and the expression pedal.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#14
LordKhufu if you can stretch that to $500, you could grab an Atomic Amplifire on the used market. there's one on the bay with 2 days left but nothing on reverb.com at the moment.

if i were in your shoes, and didn't want to spend $500, i'd buy another pod bean 2.0 and call it a day at $50-75. but that's me, your budget and ears guide only you padawan khufu.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at Jun 7, 2017,
#15
LordKhufu Like metalmingee, I took own a Laney IRT Studio and can vouch for how good their drive channels are. Only downside for me is the clean channel. It's got nothing on Fender. However, for crunchy cleans upwards, the IRT does a good job. Rolling the volume off on the guitar is also effective for getting a good sound.

With the above in mind and your current equipment, something like this might suffice:

https://www.amazon.com/Laney-IRTPULSE-Irt-Pulse-Preamp-USB/dp/B00U6BXCX0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1497007789&sr=8-1&keywords=laney+irt-pulse

At $200, you'd have cash spare to get a decent drum machine, you can use your existing pedals and it has USB output for recording if going through your Zoom isn't an option.
Guitars:
EVH Wolfgang Special LH
Gibson Les Paul Studio 2013
Ibanez EW20LASE-NT LH

Effects:
BOSS GT-100

Amps:
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 410
Laney IRT Studio + 112 cab