#1
I play the guitar for almost 8 years already and I always just play the same licks in solos all over again I literally don't know how to improve them and get self confidence I absolutely freeze on stage not really freeze but I just can't play the fast solos because I don't have self confidence what If I fail they'll think I suck you know and if anybody has some licks that I could learn and then mix them in the solos that I create ? Thanks people... 
#2
Build your knowledge of how music works ... how chords and melodies (from scales) work together.  This more than anything else will help you make better solos, as you'll then be able to understand others' music and try your own variations.  If you have a poor chord vocabulary, develop that.  Licks only go so far, but a lot of great players are aware of the chords, and target chord tones to bring out the sounds, when they are not playing mega-fast (and also when they are playing mega-fast with say sweep picking).

Challenge yourslef on the technique front.  Get yourself something that can slow down tunes (like transcribe from seventhstring) and choose a solo that is out of reach currently, but not too far out of reach.  Slow it down and play small sections of it accurately at say 40% speed, and observe yourself very closely for inaccuracies in your playing along... like missing a string with the pick, or hitting the wrong string or wrong fret with your fretting hand.  Watch out for tension in your body (gritted teeth, tight hands ...).  As you find problems, note them down, and concentrate on fixing them, using a metronome for timing.

Develop your ear.

Learn how to dress up a lick as well (getting into the first note, finishing off the last) with slides, harmonics, whammy-bar ...

Work on these aspects, and you'll find confidence comes with it.  It's a bit like being to speak in public ... if youj know your subject and can project it, nerves disappear.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at May 28, 2017,
#3
Quote by benifable
I play the guitar for almost 8 years already and I always just play the same licks in solos all over again I literally don't know how to improve them and get self confidence I absolutely freeze on stage not really freeze but I just can't play the fast solos because I don't have self confidence what If I fail they'll think I suck you know and if anybody has some licks that I could learn and then mix them in the solos that I create ? Thanks people... 


Play your solos using the notes in the chords, large intervals, hybrid picking.
#4
Quote by benifable
...because I don't have self confidence what If I fail they'll think I suck you know...

Soloing is the band suggesting to the audience they shift attention focus on a particular musician for a little while... you need to be confident in what you play. Momentary confidence varies with what you might play in what song and situation, so in order to hold a solid level of confidence you need to "know your limitations"... and recognize when they change.

A strategy of staying within your bounds needs to have some flexibility to meet different circumstances; one simple way is to have "levels" or "gears" or "phases"... however you want to think about it. I'll use gears as an example.

First Gear - this includes everything you can play perfectly every time without concern or effort under all circumstances, including you not feeling your best, your gear acting up, other band members having a bad night, etc. First gear is your baseline of perfection, what you can do no matter what. This is the solid foundation for your confidence - because you can always downshift into first gear.

Second Gear - this is generally where you stay for most stage performance. It is a little beyond your "perfect" ability and slightly risky, but if everything else is going fine and you are feeling good then this is really your normal choice. You can comfortably push yourself for the sake of the performance and your audience... but if anything comes up you can always shift down into first with full confidence until the thing is resolved or past.
The key to effective second gear performance is recognizing when to down shift into first before "lugging the engine" - before it becomes painfully obvious that one is in too high a gear for the load. You need to anticipate and respond to things quickly and smoothly so it doesn't just sound like you tried playing something too hard and bailed out of it to play something easier.

Third Gear - this is when everything (the audience, the band, the gear, the evening, the music...) are all just right and your confidence expands. This is real expanded confidence, not inflated false confidence... it is very important to learn to recognize real usable confidence expansion. This might be the occasional moments, or a part of or a whole song, or if you are really lucky perhaps a whole set. These are the periods where it feels like you can do no wrong and the music just zooms out of you; and when over you just shift back down into second, whose red line has now become more extended!.  These are profound moments that actually move you forward in the process of becoming a musician (you can feel the shifting of the boundaries further out).
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#5
Only two ways to improve:

1) practice - playing when nervous will cut your performance ability by like 40%, so the more you practice, the less impact that has on you.

2) Practice playing live - it's the only way to conquer nerves. Ge5 as many gigs in as you can.
#6
Quote by reverb66
Only two ways to improve:

1) practice - playing when nervous will cut your performance ability by like 40%, so the more you practice, the less impact that has on you.

2) Practice playing live - it's the only way to conquer nerves. Ge5 as many gigs in as you can.

Do you think busking would count as a "gig"?
#8
Quote by reverb66
Only two ways to improve:

1) practice - playing when nervous will cut your performance ability by like 40%, so the more you practice, the less impact that has on you.

2) Practice playing live - it's the only way to conquer nerves. Ge5 as many gigs in as you can.


To add to this, playing live is very different from playing in your practice space since many things besides having an audience are different. There are many of variables like temperature, lighting, sound (acoustics, differences in volume, etc), physical proximity (both distance and positioning in the area relative to your band and equipment) that change from venue to venue. They will almost always be different from your practice space and unlike your practice space, where you have consistency and control, these factors will be outside of your control.

The more you get used to playing in different circumstances, the less they will affect you when performing.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.