#1
So, today, the high e string on my guitar broke, after I replaced it just two weeks ago. I don't know why, but I guess two to four hours practice every day, with lots of bending and also quite aggressive strumming takes a toll on a string. So, I thought since it's only the high e, the obvious solution would be to get an e string in a thicker gauge like .011 (currently use .010). I don't think it'll make much of a difference in tone (not that I care about tone that much anyway), and I hope it'd be a bit less likely to snap.

So, can I mess anything up that way? Dunno, intonation or whatever. I somehow doubt that it'd make a difference for the setup (neck), and I think an adjustment to the corresponding bridge saddle, if anything, should be enough. Any mistakes there, or can I go ahead and try?
#2
Just do it, will be fine. But, prvided there is no techy reason for top string failure (e.g. sharp bridge) you would be better off learning to play without breaking the string - it's a real pain when you are gigging.
#3
You might want to reduce the "aggressive strumming." My teacher always said, "let the pickups do the work." Turns out it also allows you to move more quickly and it reduces fretwear, etc. If you're concerned about losing dynamics, change to a thick acrylic pick (I'm using a Gravity Picks Razer 2).

You might also want to make sure that your sweat is NOT staying on the strings; it could easily be that you've just corroded the strings quickly and that the skinny rusted string snapped because of the corrosion.
#4
Just setup intonation, otherwise you are ok. Also sometimes strings just break. I fit doesnt happen reguraly, then its not a big deal i think. I broke about 4 strings in my life, and most of them were just a few days old, while normaly, my strings last for a few months before i change them.
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#5
Quote by dspellman
 You might want to reduce the "aggressive strumming."  My teacher always said, "let the pickups do the work." Turns out it also allows you to move more quickly and it reduces fretwear, etc.  If you're concerned about losing dynamics, change to a thick acrylic pick (I'm using a Gravity Picks Razer 2).

 You might also want to make sure that your sweat is NOT staying on the strings; it could easily be that you've just corroded the strings quickly and that the skinny rusted string snapped because of the corrosion.

Every couple years my son asks me to teach him some stuff on guitar and his 1st observation is always that it looks like I'm hardly touching the strings with either hand.  New players work too hard.  Getting volume and good tone isn't how hard you pick or how tightly you grip your chords, it's about technique.

Good point about the sweat too.  Some people never have to worry about it, they either don't sweat much or they are lucky enough to have sweat that doesn't seem to harm strings.  Other people, myself included, have to use coated strings (which I don't like on electrics) or they have to clean the strings every time they play.
Quote by HashtagMCI thought since it's only the high e, the obvious solution would be to get an e string in a thicker gauge like .011 (currently use .010). I don't think it'll make much of a difference in tone (not that I care about tone that much anyway), and I hope it'd be a bit less likely to snap.

Moving to a heavier string means you have to tune to a greater tension which makes the string more likely to snap.  If you want to break fewer strings use a lighter string.  Mismatching string sets is generally safe as long as you don't go overboard.  If you use extra lights for your top 3 strings and extra heavy on the bottom then it can make the neck twist but if you use lights for 5 strings and 1 extra light that won't cause a problem.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at May 31, 2017,
#6
Is the string breaking at the same spot every time? You could have a sharp spot on the bridge saddle or the nut causing the string to break.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#7
Quote by ibanezguitars44
Is the string breaking at the same spot every time? You could have a sharp spot on the bridge saddle or the nut causing the string to break.

Very true.  Or if you don't string the guitar properly that can cause them to break too. 
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#8
I would not recommend to change the string gauge. The problem is not with the sting thickness, but either the technique or the guitar itself. 

Also, you do not put a fresh sting and start bending practice exercises. If you do not break in the sting gently, it will go out of tune. you have to overbend to compensate. Since bending is not just a skill from your hand, but the co-ordination of your ear and hand, you are actually not improving your technique but confusing yourself more. 
#9
So, got a string in the same gauge to see how long it works this time. So far (1 week in or so), it's still there and not torn yet ^^ I'm pretty sure my guitar hates me, because I never wasted a thought on cleaning or anything, perhaps I should start giving it some love and care xD Gonna keep that about strumming less hard in mind.
#10
I still think there might be something catching the string and breaking it. You should be able to ht the strings pretty dang hard without breaking any.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


╠═══════╬═══════╣
τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
╠═══════╬═══════╣
#11
Can I go wrong with different gauges on the same guitar.


Yes, but it's difficult threading two strings through those little tuner holes.
#12
Quote by HashtagMC
So, today, the high e string on my guitar broke, after I replaced it just two weeks ago. I don't know why, but I guess two to four hours practice every day, with lots of bending and also quite aggressive strumming takes a toll on a string. So, I thought since it's only the high e, the obvious solution would be to get an e string in a thicker gauge like .011 (currently use .010). I don't think it'll make much of a difference in tone (not that I care about tone that much anyway), and I hope it'd be a bit less likely to snap.

So, can I mess anything up that way? Dunno, intonation or whatever. I somehow doubt that it'd make a difference for the setup (neck), and I think an adjustment to the corresponding bridge saddle, if anything, should be enough. Any mistakes there, or can I go ahead and try?

It will mess with the intonation, but I would seriously not recommend changing gauges for string breaks, it won't necessarily help-  if you're playing 2 to 4 hours of intensively per day you should be changing your strings every week or two regardless. 

There are adjustments that can be made to minimize string breaks, but  based on what you're saying, the amount and type of playing, I don't think you have an issue. 
#13
Third string just tore at the same spot... I'm starting to think the high e bridge saddle has a sharp edge or something, because I just found they always tear at there. Übermorgen (what's the day after tomorrow called in English?), I'll have the guitar store guy take a look at it... he sold the guitar to me this February, if the bridge is faulty, it's his goddamn job to fix his.