#1
Nah, this isn't one of those threads. I just saw an old one pop up that started in, I believe, 2006. Necro'd once in 2010 and again sometime today.

What's interesting is that now Agile actually has sort of "vintage," discontinued models that people keep an eye out for. The Agile AL 3000 has pretty much disappeared (I just snagged one that dates to 2004/5 a couple of weeks ago in a pawn shop). Mine actually has a full-thickness figured maple cap and P90's (both of which were in the minority in those days). AL-3100s (swapped the abalone inlays for real MOP inlays) are also a bit difficult to find, but they're out there. The AL 2000 is gone, with the AL-1900 bolt neck and the AL-2500 set neck models replacing it. The AL2000 Floyd versions were near impossible to find back when and even tougher to locate now, and the AL3100 Floyds, which came in both a 24-fret and a 22-fret version, are rare on the ground. AL3200s, which were arguably the best Agile LP-style guitar, still show up on the Rondo site occasionally, but have never appeared with a Floyd (unless they were a B-stock return of a custom order).

I think we've moved past the question of whether they were "as good as" or "better than" a Gibson. All of mine, even the cheapest (er..."least expensive") are high-quality, professional-capable instruments, and the ones I own have (some of them) withstood the test of time and hard use as well as any guitar I've owned. They've provided great tone, great platforms for pickup and wiring swaps (where needed) and have been great players when properly set up. I've got more Gibsons than Agiles, but some of the Gibbies have become rather "precious," so the Agiles are often chosen to go to war instead.

In a lot of ways, some Agiles can't be compared to Gibsons. The neck-through AL3200 doesn't have a peer in the Gibson hierarchy. If you want a solid body guitar with an Axcess-style neck and tummy cut and a Floyd and neck-through construction, you can't find anything in the Gibson product line. I have an LP-like guitar with seven strings, 24 frets and a 27" scale. No Gibsons even close to that arena. There are eight-strings with the same specs, and Gibson hasn't gotten there yet. There's even a six-string AL with a multiscale (fan fret) neck. It looks weird, plays fine, and is probably unlikely to be a big seller, but there's no Gibson analogue there, either.

The pricing differences between Gibson and Agile mean that you're not likely to take a chance on a Gibson with a strange configuration just to see if you like it. And it means that Gibson is unlikely to build that strange configuration and put a few out there just to see if customers might take to it. The stakes are too high.

Which brings us to one last observation. A small, agile (had to do it) marketing model has some advantages over a big, clunky one that lives and breathes tradition. The latter is like the big oil or container ships that take a half a day to make a turn. It's a course not easily changed. Rondo, however, can move with customer interest with far less effort and risk.

But lately, my realization that some of my favorite Agiles are no longer being made has caused me to do a bit of casual hunting for backups. There aren't any original Gibson '59's out there for cheap money, as there were once. I may have to snag some of the original Agiles for cheap money while I can.
#2
I'm sure agile will be doing custom shop reissues to bring back the glory days soon .

Good points though. At some point brands come into their own and players seek them out on their own merits. Look at the early Ibanez models and how they become desirable collectors items
#3
Good points. I have owned a couple Agiles over the years and I remember an old P90 gold top that was just stellar to play. Occasionally you see the older ones pop up from time to time. Another thing to note and something I have seen is how well they hold there value. I assume the mark-up on the guitar is not too hefty as there is not a third party to go through but some are selling for right around what they cost new.  I haven't ventured to try any of the newer Agiles in a while but I do frequent the Rondo site weekly, so really its just a matter of time.
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#4
Quote by bobafettacheese
Good points. I have owned a couple Agiles over the years and I remember an old P90 gold top that was just stellar to play. Occasionally you see the older ones pop up from time to time. Another thing to note and something I have seen is how well they hold there value. I assume the mark-up on the guitar is not too hefty as there is not a third party to go through but some are selling for right around what they cost new.  I haven't ventured to try any of the newer Agiles in a while but I do frequent the Rondo site weekly, so really its just a matter of time.


Yeah, I've noticed that too, much to my dismay. Craigs, eBay and GC's Used Stuff all seem to mark them the same, dings and all. Rats!
#5
I was contemplating getting an Agile over the Epi, very satisfied with the Epi but wonder if the outcome would have been different had the Agile been as available. Still looking to get one, looking on ebay, used AL 2000's are going for more than some of the new AL 3010's


Also, got an email saying AL-3200's will be in stock towards the end of June, reserving one.
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Last edited by SanDune65 at Jun 1, 2017,
#6
Quote by SanDune65


Also, got an email saying AL-3200's will be in stock towards the end of June, reserving one.


If they've got one with a Floyd....*sigh*
Worse if they've got one with 24 frets and a 25.5" scale.
Three times in the last year, now, I've told myself I have ALL the Agiles I really need.
#7
You are right. I just looked on EBay and the current Agile AL-2000's on EBay are going for as much or more than the original price. As I remember I paid $225 for my AL-2000 about 3 years ago and I see two with an asking price over $300. 
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#8
Quote by dspellman
If they've got one with a Floyd....*sigh*
Worse if they've got one with 24 frets and a 25.5" scale.
Three times in the last year, now, I've told myself I have ALL the Agiles I really need.

but were you listening... 
#9
Amusingly, the fretless is still selling cheap.
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#10
dspellman what is the lightest agile you own? i know weight isn't important to you as much as it is to others, but it's a factor many people consider.
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#11
Quote by gregs1020
dspellman what is the lightest agile you own? i know weight isn't important to you as much as it is to others, but it's a factor many people consider.


The AD-2300. Looks like this (without the plastic on the P90's, of course):



It's an LP Special-alike, and it's just over 7 lbs.

I honestly haven't weighed all of the AL (LP-alike) series yet, and I should do that. The AL727 (seven-string, 27" scale), however, is the beast of the bunch. It's all cement and lead. At a guess, I'd put the lightest at the oldest, the 2004/5 AL-3000 with the solid maple cap and P90's. Everything else has a Floyd.
#12
dspellman i only ask as I have limited experience with used or new agiles, i've only found 3 hanging in shops by me, all were used guitars. all of which were on the heavier than usual side, which may explain why those 3 guitars were back in the shops.

so i have this perception based on the those three guitars. a 7 lb special-esque LP/SC would kick ass. an 8.5 lbs lester would be great. (all but one of the gibbys i had were over 8.5 lbs) i'd probably buy and keep those too if i found them. i guess for me just knowing that they aren't all boat anchors would help change that perception.

the qc on those three heavies was great though, i'd put the qc on par with the SE prs guitars.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#13
Quote by gregs1020
i guess for me just knowing that they aren't all boat anchors would help change that perception.

the qc on those three heavies was great though, i'd put the qc on par with the SE prs guitars.


The early models were, I believe, all built at World in Korea, which is the home base for most of the PRS SE guitars as well. Recent models have (some of them) expanded to Indonesia and VietNam. World's quality is among the best of the Asian sources, which is probably why some of the older Agiles are being cherry-picked.

Agile AL-series have a fairly well-deserved reputation for being heavy; they're SOLID bodied guitars and full thickness, and they're not going to feel like a weight-relieved or chambered LP. I think there ARE a few models (the 2800?) and some customs that have chambered bodies and that are definitely lighter. Some of the newer models have slightly thinner bodies, and that's shaved some weight.