#1
Im trying to write a song, but Im a little confused on something. Lets just say if I write a guitar riff intro and then a verse, a lot of songs have the intro be able to play with the verse, or the verse with the chorus.. So like the guitar riff of the verse can play with the chorus, or the intro riff can play with the verse, not all bands have those riffs play simultaneously but they can. Is this just coincidence, do i have to write songs like that, or will it be all over the place, also if this is a thing whats it called
#2
So you are talking about songs that use the same riff (or same chords) in many different sections (like Smells Like Teen Spirit - the intro is the same riff as the chorus and the verse has the same chords as the intro/chorus)?

You don't need to write songs like that, but you can write songs like that. It's really all up to you. Some songs have completely different sounding verses and choruses, others just have the same riff repeating over and over again and just use different melodies for different sections. Repeating the same riff/chords over and over again will make the song automatically sound coherent, and you don't need to worry about making the transitions between different sections work. But it requires you to be able to use contrasts really well. Using different chords/riffs for all of the different sections on the other hand requires you to come up with more different sounding ideas, but you don't need to worry that much about contrasts because just using different chords/riffs usually makes the different sections sound contrasting enough, so it's easier to keep interesting.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
MaggaraMarine Not quite, the verse riff or intro riff isnt exactly played over the chorus, it just CAN be played, like it would work IF you played it that way, I was just wondering if I wrote a song that had a verse riff not work over a chorus riff and still have it sound organized and well good
#4
Devonstation
Do you have any examples of songs where the verse/intro riff can be played over the chorus?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Well, you could play the intro riff over the verse if you wanted to, but that's simply because they are the same length and the verse is basically just a tonic pedal point (what I mean is that the song is in the key of C minor and in the verse there are no changes in harmony - everything is centered around C, i.e. the tonic) and they are in the same key. They aren't that different rhythmically either (both have constant 8ths going on). If the chords in the verse changed or if there was a modulation to another key, or if the verse riff was longer/shorter than the intro riff, they wouldn't work on top of each other. In this case it seems like it's just a coincidence. But because they share some similarities, they also work in the same song without sounding too out of place. This doesn't mean you have to write a verse that would work over the chorus. There are plenty of examples where this doesn't happen and those songs work just fine too.

There are also plenty of examples of songs that have the same chords repeating throughout the song, and there's nothing wrong with that either. But as I said, that requires a more creative use of contrasts, because repeating the same thing over and over again can get boring pretty easily.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115