#1
So I got some questions that I could not really find on the internet so Imma ask over here.

As everyone know (I assume), all of the vintage Les Paul were all initially Cherry Sunburst. Over the years, the colour fades to the variety of burst and finishes we seen today like Lemon Drop (Take 'The Beast' for an example) and Desert Burst .

As Epiphone Les Paul Plustop Pro also have the sunburst & honeyburst. Do the colour fade over time when they're not kept in the case and under the bed and are in regular use?

It'll be interesting to see my Les Paul just fade colour 1 to 2 decade down the road (esp if it's Epiphone LOL). 

From what I know, the difference between Gibby and Epipy is that one uses Nitro while the other uses Poly respectively. The different type of finish only affect the feel of the guitar in general where Nitro tend to wear down faster than Poly due to Poly being a thicker finish.

However, I do believe that the burst sprayed onto the guitar underneath will still fade despite the different finish,

What are you guys opinion? It'll be interesting to hear out.
Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod

Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod

1999 Japanese Epiphone Les Paul Standard LP-80 with Peter Green Mod
#2
No it wont and modern Gibson finishes dont either. The amount of plastisizers in the finish and change of dyes over the years made sure of it for the most part.


So yeah, dont expect much if any fade from a new Epiphone or even a Gibson really. Heck only up until 4 years ago did they start reusing aniline dyes on the CS RIs so the backs would fade and I think they still dont use them for the tops.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#3
H4T3BR33D3R So the R9 series will still fade?

How about Heritage Guitars?
Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod

Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod

1999 Japanese Epiphone Les Paul Standard LP-80 with Peter Green Mod
#4
Quote by noobyXD
H4T3BR33D3R So the R9 series will still fade?

How about Heritage Guitars?


Only the back of the guitar and I cant speak for heritage because I dont know what they use to apply finishes and color. My guess is no or not without a ton of sunlight because UV resistant dyes and paints are still a thing becauss most people dont want their guitars to fade.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#5
H4T3BR33D3R From my knowledge, they're still making the guitars the same way they did for the legendary 59 Les Paul.... If assuming they do 100% the same way they did 60 years ago.
Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod

Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod

1999 Japanese Epiphone Les Paul Standard LP-80 with Peter Green Mod
#6
Quote by noobyXD
H4T3BR33D3R From my knowledge, they're still making the guitars the same way they did for the legendary 59 Les Paul.... If assuming they do 100% the same way they did 60 years ago.


They really dont. Theyre nice though and made in the old Gibson factory.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#8
Quote by noobyXD
So I got some questions that I could not really find on the internet so Imma ask over here.

As everyone know (I assume), all of the vintage Les Paul were all initially Cherry Sunburst. Over the years, the colour fades to the variety of burst and finishes we seen today like Lemon Drop (Take 'The Beast' for an example) and Desert Burst .

As Epiphone Les Paul Plustop Pro also have the sunburst & honeyburst. Do the colour fade over time when they're not kept in the case and under the bed and are in regular use?

It'll be interesting to see my Les Paul just fade colour 1 to 2 decade down the road (esp if it's Epiphone LOL). 

From what I know, the difference between Gibby and Epipy is that one uses Nitro while the other uses Poly respectively. The different type of finish only affect the feel of the guitar in general where Nitro tend to wear down faster than Poly due to Poly being a thicker finish.

However, I do believe that the burst sprayed onto the guitar underneath will still fade despite the different finish,

What are you guys opinion? It'll be interesting to hear out.


Uh...no.
First, not all vintage guitars were made the same. At some point in 1960 the dye was changed to reduce the UV fading that occurs with the '58's and '59s. It's a different color than the original as well -- a bit more "tomato" in color. It's not unusual to find a 1960 relatively unchanged -- Norm had one for several years. In fact, some of the '59's didn't change significantly, either (I have photos).

The nitrocellulose lacquer used over the bursts is a clear coat. It yellows, embrittles, cracks, checks, chalks. There are additives to current nitrocellulose designed to help reduce all of that, but they're only marginally effective.

You need to know that nitrocellulose is not a thinner coating than polyurethane or polyester. This is a myth perpetuated by guitarists who saw print-through of grain on the surface of the lacquer and assumed thinness. This same lacquer when used on old cars has been a source of hair-pulling for hot-rodders; every imperfection in the surface of the car, even under 40 coats of hand-rubbed lacquer, will eventually show on the surface of the lacquer. At that point the lacquer needs to be sanded and polished again. It's only a lack of understanding on the part of guitarists that has them thinking nitrocellulose is a thin finish. Gibson finishes are often quite thick. I've got a photo of the finish removed from the back of an R7 around here somewhere, and it's a LOT of lacquer.



Other manufacturers using coatings such as UV-catalyzed polyester can actually produce a thinner, more even finish with fewer coats. Taylor uses one such system with a robotic fixture and spray arm that is capable of a more even coat than any human with a spray gun. Polyester can *look* like it's thicker because it doesn't do grain print-through, but is self-leveling (which also reduces sanding/polishing time). This can be scientifically proved these days using the film thickness detectors used routinely by car painters, etc. See here: http://www.elcometer.com/en/coating-thickness-gauge.html

The burst on an Epiphone isn't going to fade the way the old Gibsons did (nor do the current Gibsons fade the way the old ones did). None of it is the same material. Further, the polywhatever on an Epiphone is a better UV protectant than nitrocellulose ever was, and it was largely UV that faded the original Gibson bursts.