#1
Hi guys,

Months ago I had a classical guitar just to learn the basics, my idiot ass thought it was a good idea to change the classical chords to acoustic chords because I thought it sounded better, as a result, I couldn't do most chords because the strings were too tight, would hurt my fingers. Anyways now I bought a real acoustic guitar, and I thought it would make a drastic change, there is but the D chord still seems a tiny bit tight, and hard on my fingers, and chords like AM, or E chord are sometimes difficult, so whenever I play a song there's always a string that sounds off key. You know that buzzing sound a string does when it's too tight or when you haven't pressed your finger hard enough, but how hard can I go? Honestly it always hurts after a while especially with the first fret, so I feel like I'm back to the beginning and I feel bummed cause it feels like I'm not getting any better with this instrument (Learned to play it couple months ago).
What is the problem?

Thanks for your answers 
#2
I wasn't aware there were different chords for classical and accoustic music? WTF?

If your strings are were tight it has nothing to do with this anyway. Get the guitar(s) set up right, preferably by a professional.
Nylon strung guitars should be more gentle on your fingers than metal ones with the same action.

You should not need to press any of the strings hard anyway.
If the first fret is an issue it is usually that the nut is not set up right making the strings too high.
Last edited by PSimonR at Jun 5, 2017,
#3
What do you mean by "classical chords" and "acoustic chords"? As far as I can tell, chords are chords. There might be different inversions but they contain the same notes...
#4
By chords she means strings.  I think she put steel on a classical, recipe for disaster.  She may be tuning above standard concert.  Play before you buy.  Now that you're stuck with it, assuming you can't get a trade/refund you'll have to get it setup at a store or luthier.  In the interim a capo should help.  If you want to play in standard concert tune 1/2 step down and use the capo on the first fret.
#6
I bought an acoustic guitar with normal acoustic strings, I just talked about my mistake with my classic guitar but I don't have it anymore. My question was why I cannot seem to sound good on guitar, chords like D major, Am, or E sound like shit sometimes
#7
There's tons of possible reasons.  Maybe your fingernails are preventing you from pressing the string down completely.  Maybe the action's too high, either at the bridge, nut, or both.  Maybe the intonation is off - the distance of each string from the nut to the saddle that gives it the best relationship with the other strings' tuning.  In rare cases the slots in the nut are not angled evenly.
I'm leaning toward intonation problems.
Take it to the store shop and see if the tech can find a mechanical problem.
#8
Quote by sarahinesb1994
I bought an acoustic guitar with normal acoustic strings, I just talked about my mistake with my classic guitar but I don't have it anymore. My question was why I cannot seem to sound good on guitar, chords like D major, Am, or E sound like shit sometimes
Well, because you're not pushing down hard enough, plain and simple.

Anybody can get notes to sound with a nylon string guitar, or for that matter,an electric guitar with very light strings. When you get to the steel string flat top, that's an entirely different matter.

Now, assuming your steel string acoustic is set up properly, (which it likely isn't), you still need to develop callouses on your fingers, and strength in your forearm to play it.

So, take the guitar to a tech, (if you're not capable of setting it up yourself), and have the action brought into spec.

After which unfortunately, you won't have any excuses for not making notes sound correctly other than: I'm too natively weak to ever play the steel string, or, I don't, or won't, put in the time and effort in practice to get strong enough, (to play the steel string).

Now, if the strings on the guitar are too high, when you fret a note, it will pull sharp. That's what's called, "an intonation error". I seriously doubt that's the problem you're having, but I just wanted to touch on it. Intonation error will cause a guitar to, "sound like shit", but properly more so to a trained ear, rather than to someone who's busy making mutes and buzzes from not being able to fret notes correctly.

In summation: Put the right strings on the right guitar. Get the guitar "set up" properly. Practice, practice, practice. (And before I forget, consult a teacher or a reliable online source such as: https://www.justinguitar.com/ to get the fundamentals of hand position down correctly). Since, if you learn and practice incorrect hand technique from the beginning, it's likely you'll struggle with it for as long as you play.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 7, 2017,
#9
Quote by sarahinesb1994
I bought an acoustic guitar with normal acoustic strings, I just talked about my mistake with my classic guitar but I don't have it anymore. My question was why I cannot seem to sound good on guitar, chords like D major, Am, or E sound like shit sometimes

Well first (as already mentioned), you need to make sure your guitar is set up with nice low action or it will be much harder to fret chords. Second, you don't become great on guitar after a few months unless you're a natural and that is rare. I've been playing 3 years and I still get sloppy on basic chords. You just have to keep practicing and it will come. I'm sure everyone here has experienced frustration for not progressing as quickly as we hoped. It may seem like you're not getting anywhere but trust me, you are. It's just a long process of training your hands and fingers and the pace of progression is different for everyone.