#1
I have a looper pedal, two small combo amps and an ABY box.

With this equipment (or something similar) is there any way I could do the following without unplugging/replugging guitar cables:

Create a loop using one of the amps, then while it plays back through that amp play over the top of it through the other amp?

Thanks for any help.
#2
If it's going to be a permanent setup, it's as easy as plugging the looper in between the ABY and one of the amps. This is (basically) what I do. It's simple, predictable and intuitive, since the only alteration to the standard mono setup is an extra amp and the signal routing, which you've already got figured out. I don't even use an ABY, I just have a splitter so both amps are going all the time. I just set the looper amp clean and a little lower in the mix, with the loop volume turned up, so loops come through at whatever volume I need but the original sound remains exactly as it was. It cuts down on messing around with two or three foot taps or volume adjustments, which I need because I am clumsy and it's all I can manage just to hit the loop on the downbeat. 

If you want to switch off between amps, or at some point have the loop going through both amps, it's going to be more complicated. You'd probably use a stereo looper and a panning pedal to control what the looper "hears." I would not suggest it, there's a whole lot more signal routing involved and it's probably going to be unpleasant to set up live. 
#4
I am curious as to why you would do this rather than using just 1 amp. 
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#5
Assuming you are wanting to utilize one amp / signal for a loop and the second amp / signal for playthrough

Guitar -> ABY -> (signal 1) -> looper -> amp (signal 2) -> amp.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#6
Quote by Mincer
I am curious as to why you would do this rather than using just 1 amp. 

If you want to loop into a dirty amp, then you need to play through another amp while playing over the loop.  Basically he would be limited to a loop with a single guitar line if the looped amp has much crunch.
#7
Thanks for the replies. My reason for wanting to use two amps with the loop pedal is due to what fly135 has mentioned.
#8
Ahh..just put a distortion pedal in front of the looper and go into a clean amp. It is cheaper (and lighter) than an additional amp. Or stick the looper in the effects loop. 
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#9
He's already running a two amp rig, it doesn't sound like there's an "additional amp" problem here. Even so there are some good reasons to use two amps if the option is available. 

Wet/dry looping gives you a lot of flexibility you can't fake just by using a distortion pedal. You cannot, for example, get wet/dry separation, or double an effected live tone clean into a loop.  

For example, what if you want to record the loop clean and then alternate playing it clean and dirty, without altering your live tone? Same with adding reverb (or any other effect) to just the loop, or dubbing a loud, distorted solo which then is recorded lower in the mix for the next loop. Or playing an overdub with heavy effects through the live amp that comes through clean on replay. These are all difficult or impossible with a single amp, and trivial with two. 
#10
Quote by Roc8995
He's already running a two amp rig, it doesn't sound like there's an "additional amp" problem here. Even so there are some good reasons to use two amps if the option is available. 

Wet/dry looping gives you a lot of flexibility you can't fake just by using a distortion pedal. You cannot, for example, get wet/dry separation, or double an effected live tone clean into a loop.  

For example, what if you want to record the loop clean and then alternate playing it clean and dirty, without altering your live tone? Same with adding reverb (or any other effect) to just the loop, or dubbing a loud, distorted solo which then is recorded lower in the mix for the next loop. Or playing an overdub with heavy effects through the live amp that comes through clean on replay. These are all difficult or impossible with a single amp, and trivial with two. 

I always put the looper last in the chain, so producing clean overdubs over distorted loops isn't a problem. It is very easy with a single amp. 
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#11
I know it's very easy, which is why I didn't say anything about it. I'm not sure where your disagreement lies but nobody is making the claims you seem to be arguing against. 
#12
Yeah, you did..you said it was difficult or impossible. Those are literally the opposite of 'easy'. If someone wants to bring out 2 amps everywhere, that's cool. There certainly is an easier way, though. 
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#13
You've misunderstood what I was talking about, then. Perhaps I didn't explain well. If you put the looper last in the chain, and you play something distorted, when the looper plays it back it's going to be distorted, permanently, and there's nothing you can do about that. You can play clean over it, obviously. What I meant to convey was that (with your specific setup) you would always get that distortion on playback; with a different setup, you could easily get the playback to be either clean or distorted, or switch between the two at will, without effecting the ongoing live sound, and completely independent of whether it was clean or distorted. You can approximate some of that function with distortion pedals before and after the looper, but in order to leave the live tone untouched you'd need a different rig, and two amps accomplishes that easily. Same goes for effects besides distortion, which is especially relevant with things like pitch shifting where it is useful to alter the looped part independent of the live/dry. 

This is completely different from a clean overdub over a dirty part, which again is trivial, and I don't know why you insist that I'm talking about that when I'm perfectly happy to agree that it's something you can do with your setup. All I'm saying is that there are some things that are difficult or impossible with a single amp setup that are trivial with two. The thing you're talking about isn't one of them and you shouldn't interpret anything I wrote as suggesting that it was. If some of my examples were confusing to you, I apologize, but surely you can admit that even if I didn't explain them well, there are some benefits to using two amps. 

There are definitely easier ways, as you say, if you don't want some of the functions I was talking about. It should also be obvious that there are some benefits to using two amps, though, and I'm not sure it's productive to continue to keep telling people to do it your way, when they asked specifically about exploring different options.