#1
Hey guys!

So recently I got my brand new Yamaha Pacifica 112V a setup at my local guitar tech. I mainly did the setup since I thought the guitar was having some fret buzz, especially on the thicker strings. But now when I got it back, it still buzzes quite much, especially when I'm doing power chords (if I don't do them with a very very light touch). The tech said that it's normal for a guitar to buzz to a certain degree, and that I shouldn't worry about it at all. Even his guitars did the same he told me. And he has been playing guitar for a long time and has done setups for 20+ years I believe. 

But is this really normal? He told me that my playstyle may contribute to the buzzing aswell (I'm a newbie so yea, maybe it is), but I'm not sure really. 

Here are some vids when I'm playing with and without an amp (might wanna turn up the volume on the non-amp one): 

(Without amp)
(With amp) - Can't hear the buzzing through the amp right?

Also, here is a picture showing the string height at the 3rd and 5th fret. Maybe it doesn't tell too much, but at least it's something :P
http://imgur.com/a/5nGCI

I just wanna be sure that it's nothing wrong with my guitar  
Last edited by oskiii at Jun 8, 2017,
#2
That's more buzz than I have on any of my guitars even when doing heavy down picking chug, chug, chug stuff.  If you can hear it through the amp then it's too much.  

How to fix it?  Depends on how you like your action but if it were mine I'd start with setup all over again - nut slots for the action across frets 1-3, neck relief/bow, and then action by adjusting the bridge.  I'd also use a Fret Rocker to check for any offending high frets.  

The Pacifica is an entry level guitar however they have a good reputation for being quality, especially at the price point.  I wouldn't expect it to be perfect but you should be able to get it better than that.  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#3
Quote by metalmingee
That's more buzz than I have on any of my guitars even when doing heavy down picking chug, chug, chug stuff.  If you can hear it through the amp then it's too much.  

How to fix it?  Depends on how you like your action but if it were mine I'd start with setup all over again - nut slots for the action across frets 1-3, neck relief/bow, and then action by adjusting the bridge.  I'd also use a Fret Rocker to check for any offending high frets.  

The Pacifica is an entry level guitar however they have a good reputation for being quality, especially at the price point.  I wouldn't expect it to be perfect but you should be able to get it better than that.  

Yeah I really expected no buzzing at all :/ But I don't know... Do you think something is wrong with the guitar or is it just the setup? I thought the guitar tech would get rid of everything but apparently not...
#4
Just about every guitar buzzes at some point, especially in this price range.  The key for me is to not hear it through the amp or affect sustain as I like my action pretty low.  

Guitar techs in shops are really hit or miss to be frank.   I'm guessing it's the setup more than anything but if you want to be sure or want to learn how to properly setup your own guitar, I'm a huge fan of buying the proper tools.  

Most online shops will have a kit you can purchase.  I'd suggest an 18" straight edge, feeler guage set, fret rocker, radius gauges, and the proper truss rod tool for your guitar(s).  You're looking around $100, maybe a bit more in materials that will last you a lifetime.   Stew-Mac is the go to and I've been really happy with Philadelphia Luthier.  There are probably countless others.  

With the correct tools you can take measurements and figure out what you like and put the guitar back to where you like it as things change over time.  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#5
Quote by metalmingee
Just about every guitar buzzes at some point, especially in this price range.  The key for me is to not hear it through the amp or affect sustain as I like my action pretty low.  

Guitar techs in shops are really hit or miss to be frank.   I'm guessing it's the setup more than anything but if you want to be sure or want to learn how to properly setup your own guitar, I'm a huge fan of buying the proper tools.  

Most online shops will have a kit you can purchase.  I'd suggest an 18" straight edge, feeler guage set, fret rocker, radius gauges, and the proper truss rod tool for your guitar(s).  You're looking around $100, maybe a bit more in materials that will last you a lifetime.   Stew-Mac is the go to and I've been really happy with Philadelphia Luthier.  There are probably countless others.  

With the correct tools you can take measurements and figure out what you like and put the guitar back to where you like it as things change over time.  

I've just started playing and learning about the guitar so it feels so hard for me to do everything by myself haha. I feel so lost, and I just want to start playing and enjoying my new guitar :/ But I guess the time will come to learn to adjust the settings by yourself anyways. 

But if it ain't the setup that is wrong with my guitar - shouldn't I be able to refund it or something if it actually is defect in some way? As I've said, I'm completely new to the guitar so I have no idea. Or if I'm better off telling the guitar tech that set it up for me that I'm unhappy and want another setup for the money that I've already spent.
#6
Quote by oskiii
I've just started playing and learning about the guitar so it feels so hard for me to do everything by myself haha. I feel so lost, and I just want to start playing and enjoying my new guitar :/ But I guess the time will come to learn to adjust the settings by yourself anyways. 

But if it ain't the setup that is wrong with my guitar - shouldn't I be able to refund it or something if it actually is defect in some way? As I've said, I'm completely new to the guitar so I have no idea. Or if I'm better off telling the guitar tech that set it up for me that I'm unhappy and want another setup for the money that I've already spent.

Honestly, I would maybe just take it to a tech and get it set up if you're really lost and have no idea how to approach it. Working on your own guitars is nice but if you don't even know what you like or how to achieve what you're looking for via the adjustments then you might end up doing a bit more harm than good. 

So my advice would be take it to a tech to get the guitar set up and see if anything else is wrong with it. Once you do that and the guitar is all good maybe then you can ask the tech what he did and start learning to do it yourself that way. 
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#7
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Honestly, I would maybe just take it to a tech and get it set up if you're really lost and have no idea how to approach it. Working on your own guitars is nice but if you don't even know what you like or how to achieve what you're looking for via the adjustments then you might end up doing a bit more harm than good. 

So my advice would be take it to a tech to get the guitar set up and see if anything else is wrong with it. Once you do that and the guitar is all good maybe then you can ask the tech what he did and start learning to do it yourself that way. 

Yea that feels like the best option in my case too. Even if I'm very willing to learn myself aswell, but I don't think it's for the better in this case - even if I read a ton about it in the next few days haha. 

Anyways, should I go to my guitar tech that did the recent setup? Feels like I either want my money back or that he does it "properly" without the buzzing. Guess I need to talk to him either case and tell him my thoughts. 

Damned guitars... If I don't solve this shit I'll just screw it and buy a Fender Stratocaster as my first guitar instead...
#8
Quote by oskiii
Yea that feels like the best option in my case too. Even if I'm very willing to learn myself aswell, but I don't think it's for the better in this case - even if I read a ton about it in the next few days haha. 

Anyways, should I go to my guitar tech that did the recent setup? Feels like I either want my money back or that he does it "properly" without the buzzing. Guess I need to talk to him either case and tell him my thoughts. 

Damned guitars... If I don't solve this shit I'll just screw it and buy a Fender Stratocaster as my first guitar instead...

I mean, if I was in your shoes I probably wouldn't want to go to the same guy since it seems like he didn't bother to set the thing up properly in the first place. I don't think you'll get money back on a setup but I'm sure the initial shop would be willing to set it up again until it's good for you if you want to go that route. Either way, you can give that shop a call and see what they would be willing to work out.


Also I hate to be that guy, but a new, more expensive guitar isn't a guarantee that you're gonna have a guitar thats amazingly set up right out of the box. You might find yourself going through the same thing but now with more expensive gear. That's why its beneficial to learn how to work on them because eventually you get to the point that you know what you like out of your guitars and you can save yourself 60 bucks or so by doing it yourself.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#9
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I mean, if I was in your shoes I probably wouldn't want to go to the same guy since it seems like he didn't bother to set the thing up properly in the first place. I don't think you'll get money back on a setup but I'm sure the initial shop would be willing to set it up again until it's good for you if you want to go that route. Either way, you can give that shop a call and see what they would be willing to work out.


Also I hate to be that guy, but a new, more expensive guitar isn't a guarantee that you're gonna have a guitar thats amazingly set up right out of the box. You might find yourself going through the same thing but now with more expensive gear. That's why its beneficial to learn how to work on them because eventually you get to the point that you know what you like out of your guitars and you can save yourself 60 bucks or so by doing it yourself.

Yea thing is that I live in a damned small town and county too for that matter, so going to another (and possibly better) tech guy is not the easiest. Also the guy I got my setup by has a quite good reputation around here, so I really thought it would be fine by just letting him do a quick setup. Took an hour btw if that's worth mentioning. He said he usually has the guitars over for a few days to see for any changes, but he did an exception on mine. 

I guess that's true. But I feel so angry and sad that I just can't get playing. Always something wrong with stuff I buy it seems... And to just have wasted over 300 bucks would really suck.
#10
Well, then you know your options so take it to the guy again and don't accept it until its playing to a level you're satisfied to and maybe next time don't get a 'quick set up' done if you can't work on the guitar yourself. You might have to wait a little longer initially but maybe you wouldn't have to deal with as much hassle. 
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#11
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Well, then you know your options so take it to the guy again and don't accept it until its playing to a level you're satisfied to and maybe next time don't get a 'quick set up' done if you can't work on the guitar yourself. You might have to wait a little longer initially but maybe you wouldn't have to deal with as much hassle. 

Very true - might been a stupid move by me to just ask for such a quick setup. Maybe a bit too eager to play... But anyways. Thanks a lot for your time and informative answers! Will call the guy again asap.
#12
Quote by oskiii
Very true - might been a stupid move by me to just ask for such a quick setup. Maybe a bit too eager to play... But anyways. Thanks a lot for your time and informative answers! Will call the guy again asap.


Good luck and I hope you can get this all sorted. It's frustrating when all you want to do is play but stuff like this pops up.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#13
No doubt here.  Call the shop and bring the guitar back to them.  Play it for them and they should cringe when they hear what I heard on the video.  

Ask for another setup and also pick up another one off the rack and see how it plays.  Maybe you got a bad example, maybe the next one will be a gem.  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .