#1
EVERYONE talks about how to find the chords from the melody but no one talks about how to find the actual melody for the song to play with the right hand, im trying to do it for this one song but i just cant get it, i think i need more ear training. any tips? I DO NOT want (how to get chords out of melody) i want (how to get MELODY for the singing in the song) 
#2
Yeah, just ear training, practice, that's all. I work out vocal melodies on my guitar the same as working out guitar riffs or melodies, it's only a matter of identifying single notes. A little theory can help too, so if you know what key a song is in you'll know what notes are likely to be sung.
#3
They're interellated - if you can figure out the chords, the melody line (be it guitar or voice) will usually use one or more notes in the chord (with other notes inbetween to link them).

But yeah, trial and error. Knowledge of scales will make the trial/error process shorter.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
Learn to sing the melody first because that way you can make sure that you have the sound of the pitches you are looking for in your ear. And that way you can also slow the melody down as much as you want (and you can do it in your head - you don't even need to listen to the recording). So memorize the melody first. You need to know the sounds before you start looking for them on your instrument. You can't find the notes if you don't know exactly what sounds you are looking for. Also, figuring out the key of the song helps because it gives you some kind of a reference point. So you may want to start with finding the key. Find the note that sounds like home and figure out whether it sounds like major or minor.

Start with simple things. Listen to the melody and figure out the direction of it first - does it go up or down, are there big leaps or is it stepwise motion? Is there some kind of a motif that repeats? Figuring out simple things like this will help you a lot with finding the exact notes because you already know the big picture. When it comes to finding the exact notes, if it's in a major key, most of the notes will be in the major scale and if it's in a minor key, most of the notes will be in the minor scale. And if the notes are not in the key scale, they are always a half step away from a note in the key scale. Learning to recognize intervals by ear will also help.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
As stated above, first find the key. That gives you a starting point. If the music is strictly diatonic (no accidentals, aka outside notes), that cuts you down from 12 notes to 7.

Then find the chords. Melodies often use chord tones (regardless of whether the composer wrote the melody and then fit chords based on chord tones or wrote the progression and then put a melody to it). Just using the chord tones will get a good chunk of most melodies. From there, it's just connecting chord tones with passing notes in between. As long as you can tell if the note is higher or lower than the previous note and the next note.

Just using that should get you a good deal of mileage.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#6
Im thinking about learning theory but there are no good guitar teachers in my area, any suggestions for guitar teachers on youtube that teach the theory that i would need?
#7
Can you sing melodies?
Can you fit each separate note to something different on an instrument?
Do you know the note names?
#8
NeoMvsEu Yes i know the note names, im not trying to sing melodies, i want to play it like fingerstyle only BECAUSE i cant sing... thats why i want to find melodies 
#9
Quote by ccch74
NeoMvsEu Yes i know the note names, im not trying to sing melodies, i want to play it like fingerstyle only BECAUSE i cant sing... thats why i want to find melodies 

Singing them helps. You don't need to sound great, you just want to be able to sing the pitches so that you can be sure of the exact sounds that you are looking for. If you can't sing the right pitches, then it will be pretty difficult to find them on your instrument. So first learn to sing the melody that you want to figure out. If you can sing the melody, it will be really easy to figure out on your instrument because you can just find the notes that you sing one at the time.

As I said, you need to know what you are looking for before you start looking for it. You need to know the sound of the pitches first. You need to internalize the sound of the melody.



(The step 4 talked about in the video is optional - it mostly applies to learning licks that you could use in your own solos. And yes, I know the video talks about transcribing solos, but the same things apply to transcribing any melody.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jun 10, 2017,
#10
Don't worry if you can't sing (I can't). All you need to be able to do is to hear the pitch of the note clearly in your mind. And maybe try to focus on every individual note, one by one, as well as looking at "is the next note higher or lower?". Possibly start with the longer held notes which are easier to hear and then fill in the gaps.
#11
NSpen1 I've been on my piano all day (probably annoying my neighbors) trying to get the first phrase of the 1st verse and its so frustrating, i know the chords for the song, does the melody come from the chords? 
#12
ccch74
It can do, as some of the other guys have said it can come from the chord tones with passing tones in between. Often vocal melodies are quite linear, i.e. they go up and down the scale with not too many big jumps. If you link the song you're trying to work out we may be able to help you more.
#14
ccch74
ok, some of the vocal phrasing is a little faster so that's going to be trickier, but start with the note on "bad", can you hear what pitch that is? (I'll give you a couple to get you started - that's F#). Then do you hear that the first two syllables of reputation are the same note again, and the last two syllables drop down in pitch a fair amount?
Next line, find the first note - B on "She". Then hear how the next two notes go directly up the scale. After that try to find what the note on "long" is, a bit higher, right?
Notice that the 3rd line is the same melody as the 1st line, and the 4th the same as the 2nd. The following lines are similar but with a bit of variation.
#15
NSpen1  When he sings she takes the long way home  , i think its B E F# G F# E F# that all i figured out 
Last edited by ccch74 at Jun 10, 2017,