Page 2 of 2
#41
Rickholly74

And for people that think "silent mode" is okay, think again. When I say cell phone running it I mean the phone itself. It's like how in labs you see signs saying to turn your phone off because the signal messes with their equipment. Just having your phone in your pocket near your guitar (especially single coil) can potentially cause track ruining interference.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#42
Of course, the "vibrate" mode could come in handy for a solo...

Hmmm...I wonder if your phone's ringette could also do the Steve Stevens "ray gun" effect?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#43
If you are hired to be a session musician, chances are it's for some kind of a commercial project.  This means, leave your ego at the door, understand it's not about you, it's about the song, and they are expecting you to understand the difference.  

You are not being paid to solo to a backing track.   You are being paid to enhance a song, to the point that they can then take the song and accomplish the production goals (commercially intact).

Best,

Sean
#44
Sean is 100% right. I spent several years recording jingles for radio and video commercials. I was also the full time engineer in an advertising companys in-house studio. The bulk of our work was voice over and editing industrial interviews mostly for two large pharmaceutical firms who produced monthly audio newsletters to their sales staff describing new drugs and how to sell them to doctors. (Boring hours editing out "uhs", "errs" and long silent pauses etc. in the pre-digtal era when you cut and spliced tape.). About 30% of the advertising firms business was jingles, background music for instructional or educational videos. Like Sean said, most of the real day to day session work is boring commercial recording projects. My point is that no matter what the project is, the client, artist or producer usually has a very definite idea of what they want from any studio musicians they hire. The person who is in charge of the project is not hiring you to come in and be the star of a project. They are working on a specific budget and will ask for something that you are expected to deliver within just a few takes. It's about time, money and fast results. Any talk of your artistic vision is usually not well received. In my experience that's the role you accept as a studio musician. It's not for everyone. If you are looking for artistic satisfaction this isn't a job for you.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 16, 2017,
#45
"C.J., I have this...vision..."

"Yeah?"

"I'm going to compose the 'Kashmir' of jingles for your product!"

"Uh-huh. Tell ya what- you get me that blues progression I want, and we're golden. AWRIGHT, everybody: '"Colon Cleanser Constipation Station Blues' from the top in 5, 4, 3..."
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#46
Quote by dannyalcatraz
"C.J., I have this...vision..."

"Yeah?"

"I'm going to compose the 'Kashmir' of jingles for your product!"

"Uh-huh.  Tell ya what- you get me that blues progression I want, and we're golden.  AWRIGHT, everybody: '"Colon Cleanser Constipation Station Blues' from the top in 5, 4, 3..."

Excellent. Thanks for the that. It made my morning.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#47
Quote by Rickholly74
I was also the full time engineer in an advertising companys in-house studio. The bulk of our work was voice over and editing industrial interviews mostly for two large pharmaceutical firms who produced monthly audio newsletters to their sales staff describing new drugs and how to sell them to doctors. (Boring hours editing out "uhs", "errs" and long silent pauses etc. in the pre-digtal era when you cut and spliced tape.).


I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#48
What is everyone's thoughts on putting things on the back of business cards? I need to get new ones and I like the idea of putting a sketch of my name that I did on the back of it. I'd have to keep it faded for writing stuff on the back but yay or nay for the general idea?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#49
here is mine. i read through most of the way:

it takes a lifetime to build a reputation, and only a second to wreck it.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#51
Quote by theogonia777
What is everyone's thoughts on putting things on the back of business cards? I need to get new ones and I like the idea of putting a sketch of my name that I did on the back of it. I'd have to keep it faded for writing stuff on the back but yay or nay for the general idea?


If you are using business cards that are of the right material and color to write upon, don't put anything on the back. Keep it blank. That way, it can be written upon in case you need to, because:

1) you've changed info on the front and haven't gotten new cards
2) you're giving a referral (you really want EVERYONE involved to know who is giving that contact)
3) you need to give out personal contact info to a business contact
4) impromptu note pad- e.g. to remember a chord progression you just thought of; to give directions to someplace

....and so forth.

There are exceptions, of course- having multiple businesses or a lot of business related contact info, for instance. Too much stuff on one side would be cluttered and hard to read, so spreading it out over both sides makes sense.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#52
Quote by theogonia777
trashedlostfdup

Don't worry. We already got that one covered.


WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#53
Quote by dannyalcatraz
If you are using business cards that are of the right material and color to write upon, don't put anything on the back. Keep it blank. That way, it can be written upon in case you need to, because:


I covered that in my post. It would be a very light print, almost like a watermark. Like think notepads that have a subtle pattern or design on them but it writing is still very clear. Like whether or not you can write on it isn't my concern since I know it works on that front. My main concern is whether or not people think it is lame or tacky.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#54
I understood every syllable.

I've designed my fair share of professional logos, actually, at least 2 of which are still in use- one for @5 years, another approaching 25. Most were for use primarily on business cards. IME, a watermark, if it works at all- will usually look best on the card's face. If it looks bad under the face, it will also look bad under anything subsequently written on the backside.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#55
dannyalcatraz

It wouldn't work on the front anyway because there is a small graphic I made that I use as somewhat of a personal logo on music websites (other than here), flyers, etc that I would put on. The other difference between the back and front is that the front by default has "writing" on it whereas with the back there may be something written but most likely there won't be. I'm thinking of it as being more analogous to the back of a playing card. It adds some interest to the cards but unlike playing card backs it would be a fairly lightly marked design.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#56
Some really great tips. If I had to boil it down to one that I can expand upon it would be this:

Do what you do in a way that makes it easier for everyone else to do what they need to do.

That means having a range of tones together, having a trick bag of multiple styles and feels, the versatility to try it another way if the producer asks you to, and the humility to remember that it's very rarely about you.

Don't forget to dress like a pro and treat your business like you are running a million dollar empire.
#57
Quote by realchrisbrooks
That means having a range of tones together


As a session musician you probably have little-to-no say (closer to the "no" end) in the tone on the recording. They use the amp they have in the studio that the producer and engineer like, record that amp and the dry signal (or just the dry signal), and then probably reamp the dry signal with a real amp or amp sim long after you've left the session.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#58
theogonia777

There's no such thing as a standard way of doing things. I'm not talking about having a say. I'm saying if the producer wants a country tone, know how to get a country tone (with your fingers as much as what comes out at the end).

In 25 years of doing this I have been called upon to for all kinds of requirements. Even on reamping gigs the client wants to hear a good representation of the tone you are getting, so that means anything from tweaking a simulator to using various kinds of attack and tone on the guitar itself.
#59
I'm thinking every band and producer has their own recording proclivities, and knowing them going in Day 1 would be a big help. Similar knowledge about recording venues would only add to your air of professionalism.

So while there may not be a true "standard way of recording __________", there MIGHT be a "standard way Mr. Mike Czech records _______", especially at XYZ Studio or The Downtown Jazz Club.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#60
A session gig I'm going to be doing in the near future reminds me of an important point: you will at times be hired by bands or artists to play on tracks that are absolute trash. If the money is right, just grin and bear it. Just remember that it's a chance to get paid and a chance to get out there. They might show it to a friend and that friend might hear your playing and want to hire you.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#61
100%. If you are a professional studio player you should never turn down anything that you feel you can do. Get the experience, utilize the network possibilities and take the money. What you think of the material is not relevant to a pro session player. 



Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Oct 31, 2017,
#62
Jimmy Page sounds amazingly like a stereotype of a little old Englishman.

Adam Levy speaks many words of wisdom re: punctuality, preparedness, politeness, knowledge and standing on the shoulders of others...
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#63
Doing session work is like playing charades sometimes. People have no idea what they want. People want something like they heard on another song even though it's not at all compatible with their song. People sort of know what they want but don't know how to express it in understandable words. And how many times do you hear "you're the expert so just play what you think fits" only to be told that they don't really like it?

I don't know if it's worse when you're scoring video because you're working with people that know nothing about music or when you're playing on a track because you're working with people that should know about music but somehow don't.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#64
Quote by theogonia777
Doing session work is like playing charades sometimes.  People have no idea what they want.  People want something like they heard on another song even though it's not at all compatible with their song.  People sort of know what they want but don't know how to express it in understandable words.  And how many times do you hear "you're the expert so just play what you think fits" only to be told that they don't really like it?  



This is so true. They will say they don't know what they are looking for but they surely will be quick to tell you what they don't want. The fact that a producer is calling in an outside studio musician is often a sign their artist(s) didn't come up with goods and they are hoping you can. One of the greatest assets any studio musician has to develop is a thick skin and a diplomatic disposition. Sometimes no matter what you offer up it just won't be what they want.  

One tip I can offer is always have an acoustic guitar and a capo ready to go. Nothing fills holes and adds punch like big fat acoustic rhythm guitar. I has saved the day for me more than once.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 10, 2017,
#65
Sometimes people also will want to hire you to play something that really is not appropriate to their song... but they heard it somewhere and decided that they just have to have if on their song, too. Regular Veruca Salts, the lot of them.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#66
Quote by Rickholly74
They will say they don't know what they are looking for but they surely will be quick to tell you what they don't want.


That's very annoying. To be fair, though, knowing what you want and knowing what you don't aren't necessarily the same thing. I need new glasses, and I'm struggling to find a new pair of frames that I like. I can sure as heck tell pairs which I don't like, though.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#67
Just remember the human brain is a funny ole thang. It will play tricks on you. As long as you keep that in mind, your patience will not be as tested.

Years ago, I went into a record shop* looking for a particular CD** from a band whose song I had heard a portion of on the radio*** while driving in my car. I could quote some of the lyrics, and found one of the salesmen I had worked with numerous times before. I described the song’s overall sound as something like the Brand New Heavies...but it wasn’t the Brand New Heavies, I was sure.

We searched through offerings by similar sounding bands for a while, but with no luck.

After about a month, I heard a portion of the song, again, while driving. This time, the announcer told us what it was. I immediately drove back to the shop and found my sales guy, and apologetically bought the CD- it was by the Brand New Heavies.


* a store that sold music on formats that people used to listen to music on pre-MP3s and streaming services, Millennials!
** abbreviation for “compact disc”- one of the formats
***more ancient tech, but roughly analogous to a streaming service...but FREE! You did have to listen to ads and announcers, though.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#68
I was told to play with more energy and finesse. I asked for clarification and got like a page explanation and I still don't know what to do differently.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#69
Quote by theogonia777
I was told to play with more energy and finesse. I asked for clarification and got like a page explanation and I still don't know what to do differently.


Energy & Finesse were a R&B-lite duo from the late 1980s. They clearly wanted you to lay down a smooth groove. Awwwww yeahhhh.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Page 2 of 2