#1
I have decided that I am not suited/doesn't fit me playing lead guitar. Rhythm guitar is a great fit for me and really makes me want to pick up and play guitar. What should I practice to get better at rhythm playing? How should I practice it? Are there any books/videos/etc. that would teach me rhythm guitar theory and technique?
#2
Well, the obvious place to start is 

https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-136-RhythmBasics1.php

and  look at the rest of his site too.

But when I was wanting to learn rythym I went here

https://guitarjamz.com/premium/

and signed up for a month (I was on holiday for part of it) and learnt load of rythym stuff from Marty who taught it really well - and less formally than Justin 
#4
Quote by pillchill871
I have decided that I am not suited/doesn't fit me playing lead guitar. Rhythm guitar is a great fit for me and really makes me want to pick up and play guitar. What should I practice to get better at rhythm playing? How should I practice it? Are there any books/videos/etc. that would teach me rhythm guitar theory and technique?

Everything you need to learn about it is interactive:

- what tones to develop (to blend appropriately with the others for various styles of music)
- what riffs and rhythms to play (to properly assume your role in the song, in the band)
- how loud and when to change it (to support soloists, vocalists, and song parts like bridges and turnarounds)

You need to play with others to get experience with navigating and managing these interactions.
Being "better at rhythm playing" is important but not enough. Music is all about judgement; you
need to discover that almost all of that judgement centers around how to interact with the other players.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#5
pillchill871 A very useful skill is awareness of how time can be sliced up, for example dividing one 1/4 note into two 1/8 notes or into three 1/8th note triplets.  So, it's good to be able to conscioulsy pick out, in a bar of 4/4 say, any one of these points, to play a note or a chord, and then hold ut for a duration of your choice.  Also to leave silences consciously.

Unfortunately, there is a great deal of infatuation with note choice, as opposed to note placement and duration, and rhythm is definitely where there's a great deal of fun and variety to be discovered.

Grab yourself some rhythm books, such as "the rhythm bible" by Dan Fox.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jun 17, 2017,